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The Critic's Resource on AntiEvolution

NCSE Evolution Education Update for 2010/05/07

(by NCSE Deputy Director Glenn Branch)

Dear Friends of NCSE,

NCSE's Eugenie C. Scott is to receive her seventh honorary degree, and
NCSE Supporter Tim White is named one of Time's 100 most influential
people. Plus a free preview of Evolution: How We and All Living Things
Came to Be.


NCSE's executive director Eugenie C. Scott is to receive an honorary
degree from the University of Missouri, Columbia, on May 15, 2010, in
recognition of her achievements in defending the teaching of evolution
in the public schools. According to a May 4, 2010, press release from
the university:


Scott has served as the executive director of the National Center for
Science Education (NCSE) since 1987. Under her leadership, NCSE has
become the most influential organization in the battle over how
evolution is taught in the United States. ... Over the course of her
career, Scott has become the leading critic of creationism and
intelligent design in the United States and a relentless advocate for
the preservation of teaching evolution in schools.


The honorary degree will be her seventh; she received honorary Doctor
of Science degrees from McGill University in 2003, the Ohio State
University in 2005, Mount Holyoke College and the University of
Wisconsin, Milwaukee, in 2006; Rutgers University in 2007; and the
University of New Mexico in 2008.

The honor is especially meaningful for Scott, since she is a graduate
of the University of Missouri, Columbia, where she earned her Ph.D. in
physical anthropology with a dissertation on dental evolution in
pre-Columbian Peru. She previously received the university's
distinguished alumni award in 1993.

For the press release, visit: 


NCSE congratulates Tim White on his inclusion in Time magazine's list
of "the people who most affect our world" for 2010. White was honored
for his work in paleoanthropology, particularly the recently described
"Ardi" -- Ardipithecus ramidus. Sean B. Carroll wrote, "'Ardi,' a
4-ft. female, transforms our picture of our early ancestors. Ardi was
at home in trees, but she also walked upright. A woodland dweller, she
refutes the belief that modern posture was an adaptation to living on
the savanna. Gaps in human history remain, but White has filled a big
one." A Supporter of NCSE, White is Professor of Integrative Biology
at the University of California, Berkeley.

For Time's story, visit:,28804,1984685_1984745_1985500,00.html 


NCSE is pleased to offer a free preview of Daniel Loxton's Evolution:
How We and All Living Things Came to Be (Kids Can Press, 2010), aimed
at kids 8 to 13. Included are pages about the fossil record, Darwin,
mutations, evolution in action, and the evolution of the eye. "I am
just so delighted with this book!" NCSE's executive director Eugenie
C. Scott writes. "Loxton hits the key concepts perfectly, and without
being stuffy about it. A wonderful book to donate to your local
library." And Donald Prothero adds, "A wonderfully clear, up-to-date,
and well-illustrated account of how evolution works. The scientific
content is first-rate."

For the preview (PDF), visit: 

For information about the book from its publisher, visit: 

Thanks for reading! And don't forget to visit NCSE's website -- -- where you can always find the latest news on 
evolution education and threats to it.


Glenn Branch
Deputy Director
National Center for Science Education, Inc.
420 40th Street, Suite 2
Oakland, CA 94609-2509
510-601-7203 x310
fax: 510-601-7204

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