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  Topic: West Virginia Science Standards, IDNet, Raelians push ID changes< Next Oldest | Next Newest >  
Wesley R. Elsberry



Posts: 4932
Joined: May 2002

(Permalink) Posted: Jan. 14 2003,12:46   

'Intelligent design' believers, sect seek curriculum change

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People who believe in “intelligent design” are trying to change the way science is taught in West Virginia’s public schools. This time, they have an unlikely ally: the Raelian sect espoused by baby-cloner Brigitte Boisselier. On Friday, the public comment period ended for four statewide education standards. The standards for reading, math and social studies slipped through fairly quietly — but not science. More than 100 people spoke out about the new science standards, the state Department of Education estimates.


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"You can't teach an old dogma new tricks." - Dorothy Parker

    
Wesley R. Elsberry



Posts: 4932
Joined: May 2002

(Permalink) Posted: Feb. 21 2003,10:08   

NCSE Announces Adoption of West Virginia Science Standards

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Friends,

On February 20, 2003 the West Virginia Board of Education voted to adopt
new science standards developed over the past year. The vote to approve
the draft standards without any of the changes proposed by supporters of
"intelligent design theory" was unanimous. Evolution features
importantly in the new guidelines, which are based on frameworks
suggested by the National Academy of Sciences and the American
Association for the Advancement of Science.

Opponents of evolution education, including local creation science
organizations, the West Virginia American Family Association, and
Intelligent Design Network (IDnet, based in Kansas) had objected to the
proposed standards and attempted to convince the Board to make
significant changes. IDnet in particular sent several very long letters
to the Board. Two IDnet leaders presented an "Intelligent Design
symposium" and met or spoke several times with Board members and staff
of the Department of Education. In the end, the Board decided not to
make any changes in the draft standards.

Jody Cunningham, president of the West Virginia Science Teachers
Association, commented after the decision: "In a courageous move the
Board voted to reject all attempts by Intelligent Design Network to
weaken our Content Standards. It was exciting to hear the Board give
full support to the standards.  They were not changed in any way. We
were able to reject any attempt to weaken or even to insert a phrase
that was not placed in the standards by the teachers of West Virginia."


Eric

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
W. Eric Meikle, Ph.D.
Outreach Coordinator
National Center for Science Education
420 40th St., Suite 2
Oakland, CA 94609-2509
510 601-7203 x307
510 601-7204 (fax)
800 290-6006
meikle@ncseweb.org
www.ncseweb.org


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"You can't teach an old dogma new tricks." - Dorothy Parker

    
Wesley R. Elsberry



Posts: 4932
Joined: May 2002

(Permalink) Posted: Feb. 21 2003,10:11   

West Virginia Science Standards

The above page shows the various proposals by IDNet of Kansas which were rejected in their entirety by West Virginia.

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"You can't teach an old dogma new tricks." - Dorothy Parker

    
Wesley R. Elsberry



Posts: 4932
Joined: May 2002

(Permalink) Posted: Feb. 21 2003,14:42   

West Virginia science standards won't include evolution alternatives

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The standards had been opposed by the Intelligent Design Network in Shawnee Mission, Kan. Representatives of the group had spoken to the board several times.

"I don't see how you can tell kids they are not created," John Calvert, managing director of the Intelligent Design Network, said Feb. 19. "Essentially when West Virginia teaches students that living systems are not designed, that's really teaching anti-religious theory. The court has said the state has to be neutral."

Other evolution opponents said yesterday they objected to students being "indoctrinated" to believe Darwin's theory, which they said cannot be scientifically proven.

"Let's let them hear the facts and decide for themselves. That's good pedagogy," said Karl Priest, an educator for 30 years. "Let's let the kids see the debate. It's an honest debate. It will be good for students and society."

Other speakers derided evolution opponents.

"They have the same station as people who say the world is flat," said Charles Pique, a retired physicist and electrical engineer who lives in Mink Shoals.

"The scientific community believes that evolution is as certain a fact as the world is round."


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"You can't teach an old dogma new tricks." - Dorothy Parker

    
charlie d



Posts: 56
Joined: Oct. 2002

(Permalink) Posted: Feb. 21 2003,16:41   

Quote
"I don't see how you can tell kids they are not created," John Calvert, managing director of the Intelligent Design Network, said Feb. 19. "Essentially when West Virginia teaches students that living systems are not designed, that's really teaching anti-religious theory."
Well, now, isn't it nice to see that Calvert agrees that there is a perfect correspondence between design theory and specific religious beliefs that require "special creation", and that the main purpose of teaching ID is effectively to teach a religious viewpoint during science classes!  

This quote should be saved for any future occasion Calvert addresses a BoE.

  
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