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  Topic: A Separate Thread for Gary Gaulin, As big as the poop that does not look< Next Oldest | Next Newest >  
GaryGaulin



Posts: 5355
Joined: Oct. 2012

(Permalink) Posted: Feb. 07 2018,02:52   

A new (and very invasive) species of crayfish has been reported:

Quote
Just 25 years ago, the marbled crayfish did not exist at all. Now, they can be found in the wild by the millions in Germany, the Czech Republic, Hungary, Croatia, the Ukraine, Japan, and Madagascar.

www.atlasobscura.com/articles/marbled-crayfish-mutant-clone

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The theory of intelligent design holds that certain features of the universe and of living things are best explained by an intelligent cause, not an undirected process such as natural selection.

   
GaryGaulin



Posts: 5355
Joined: Oct. 2012

(Permalink) Posted: Feb. 07 2018,18:30   

From:
www.antievolution.org/cgi-bin/ikonboard/ikonboard.cgi?act=ST;f=14;t=7640;st=9540#entry260589
Quote (Lethean @ Feb. 07 2018,16:56)
Looks like Barry is once again being stifled from discussing cutting edge ID science by the A-Mats.

Won't someone save him from having to quote television?

ZZ-Top - El Loco - Ten Foot Pole
www.youtube.com/watch?v=HDgXDTZl3xU

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The theory of intelligent design holds that certain features of the universe and of living things are best explained by an intelligent cause, not an undirected process such as natural selection.

   
GaryGaulin



Posts: 5355
Joined: Oct. 2012

(Permalink) Posted: Feb. 09 2018,17:52   

A couple of days ago I found this fascinating RNA related information in the Reddit neuroscience forums. It's in a long article where most readers may have missed the best part, but I none the less waited for indication of being total garbage before mentioning it in this forum and at Sandwalk. If even only half of it is true then this will be a scientific breakthrough for the theory I'm still developing.

 
Quote
When the researchers caused amnesia with a drug, that newly formed synaptic muscle went away. “We wiped out the LTP, completely wiped it out,” says neuroscientist Tomás Ryan, who conducted the study in Tonegawa’s lab and reported the results with Tonegawa and colleagues in 2015 in Science.

And yet the memory wasn’t lost. With laser light, the researchers could still activate the engram cells — and the memory they somehow still held. That means that the memory was stored in something that isn’t related to the strength of the synapses.

The surprising results suggest that researchers may have been sidetracked, focusing too hard on synaptic strength as a memory storage system, says Ryan, now at Trinity College Dublin. “That approach has produced about 12,000 or so papers on the topic, but it hasn’t been very successful in explaining how memory works.”

~~

Back in the 1950s, McConnell suspected that RNA, cellular material that can help carry out genetic instructions but can also carry information itself, might somehow store memories.

This unorthodox idea, that RNA is involved in memory storage, has at least one modern-day supporter in Glanzman, who plans to present preliminary data at a meeting in April that suggest injections of RNA can transfer memory between sea slugs.

Glanzman thinks that RNA is a temporary storage vessel for memories, though. The real engram, he suggests, is the folding pattern of DNA in cells’ nuclei. Changes to how tightly DNA is packed can govern how genes are deployed. Those changes, part of what’s known as the epigenetic code, can be made — and even transferred — by roving RNA molecules, Glanzman argues. He is quick to point out that his idea, memory transfer by RNA, is radical. “I don’t think you could find another card-carrying Ph.D. neuroscientist who believes that.”

Other researchers, including neurobiologist David Sweatt of Vanderbilt University in Nashville, also suspect that long-lasting epigenetic changes to DNA hold memories, an idea Sweatt has been pursuing for 20 years. Because epigenetic changes can be stable, “they possess the unique attribute necessary to contribute to the engram,” he says.

And still more engram ideas abound. Some results suggest that a protein called PKM-zeta, which helps keep synapses strong, preserves memories. Other evidence suggests a role for structures called perineuronal nets, rigid sheaths that wrap around neurons. Holes in these nets allow synapses to peek through, solidifying memories, the reasoning goes (SN: 11/14/15, p. 8). A different line of research focuses on proteins that incite others to misfold and aggregate around synapses, strengthening memories. Levin, at Tufts, has his own take. He thinks that bioelectrical signals, detected by voltage-sensing proteins on the outside of cells, can store memories, though he has no evidence yet.

www.sciencenews.org/article/memory-brain-engram-neuroscience

And Larry may have stumbled over something:

sandwalk.blogspot.com/2018/02/are-splice-variants-functional-or-noise.html?showComment=1518219639226#c2528492896682186156

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The theory of intelligent design holds that certain features of the universe and of living things are best explained by an intelligent cause, not an undirected process such as natural selection.

   
Lethean



Posts: 196
Joined: Jan. 2014

(Permalink) Posted: Feb. 09 2018,22:07   

Gary, what's going on here?

Is UD pulling ahead in the ID game?

Moron memristors in action — including, crossbar networks and solving linear equation arrays

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"So I'm a pretty unusual guy and it's not stupidity that has gotten me where I am. It's brilliance."

"My brain is one of the very few independent thinking brains that you've ever met. And that's a thing of wonder to you and since you don't understand it you criticize it."


~Dave Hawkins~

  
ChemiCat



Posts: 521
Joined: Nov. 2013

(Permalink) Posted: Feb. 11 2018,04:05   

Quote
If even only half of it is true then this will be a scientific breakthrough for the theory I'm still developing.


Only in your religion-addled thinking.

  
GaryGaulin



Posts: 5355
Joined: Oct. 2012

(Permalink) Posted: Feb. 12 2018,00:55   

Quote (Lethean @ Feb. 09 2018,22:07)
Gary, what's going on here?

Is UD pulling ahead in the ID game?

Moron memristors in action — including, crossbar networks and solving linear equation arrays

I was surprised by how well it stayed topical. Years ago it would have fit into what was at the Kurzweil AI forum about the new device. But there are hundreds of ways to make or simulate networks of programmable current or voltage sources, so it's not like they were not around. To hold memory after turning off the computer system they just needed a battery added to the circuit. Electronic circuits are so much faster than living neurons that in a real-time model speed is not an issue.

From what I now know the future of "intelligent cause" related theory remains dependant upon the (still alive and doing well) RNA World, going on inside cells. Larry apparently still maintains his opinion that it should be considered "junk" but we're only two months into 2018 and there are already over 1000 new papers regarding lncRNA function:

scholar.google.com/scholar?hl=en&as_sdt=0%2C22&as_ylo=2018&q=lncRNA+function&btnG=

The evidence suggests that lncRNA expression causes cells to become mobile and independent, as are white blood cells and cancer cells. For someone like myself who has to include that ability in their model it's a genuine breakthrough I need to know more about, but of course not all are happy about it I guess (and see comments):

sandwalk.blogspot.ca/2018/02/how-many-lncrnas-are-functional.html

Personally I think Larry and others are necessarily making a whole lot of enemies by belittling ENCODE and other resources that I'm very thankful exist, and have a positive attitude that includes not bushing off many thousands of molecular RNA components as "junk" before even checking to see whether they have a function or not. These are mostly inside the nucleus, where its molecular level intelligent behavior comes from. Its moment to moment cellular level behavior for the whole cell is wired up with using metabolic connections that transmit signals from sensory network "patches" and sensilla/antennae to memory to control a variety of motor systems.

500 new papers a month seems to speak for itself. And from what I saw so far DNA is being many times looped by RNA into networks that most resemble our cerebral cortex, what I modeled into the latest ID Labs to provide two frame place avoidance navigational spatial reasoning. It's reasonable that having one there too would be handy to have for working on the morphologically related spatial problems. The theory of ID that I have does not require all that be found, but makes it more reasonable that the rather simple but powerful wave interaction can be at work there too. Worth keeping an eye out for, just in case.

It's too early to know how the loops and other things work, so at this point it's just my best guess. In either case our understanding of how genetic system work is now being transformed by better understanding what all the "junk" is for. It's adding a staggering amount of complexity to the picture that from I sense is reducing down to more simple repetitive components that can theoretically have a very fast ionic place to place wave signaling rate, not waiting for things to slowly diffuse through a string ball filled soup inside a membrane with proteins squirting out through its holes.

I have a model that stands on its own merit that makes the ID theory possible, not the other way around. As a result I do not often mention it, don't normally need to that's primarily for where the "ID controversy" has already reared its menacing head. Someone who relies on "looks designed to me" logic and old tech-news is only a distraction to those who not interested in a religious discussion and have serious work to do or want to instead discuss, share ideas. In Larry's case it did not seem he wanted to help explain what the papers are describing. But after several replies indicating that I at least understood why the lncRNA research is important I left a link to the page that right away shows the diagram real big, so that lncRNA researchers who by the end of that article want to see him get walloped will after seeing me do my best to start a discussion on the matter have a link to the ID theory that puts "the diagram" of what their area of science exists to piece together up on their screen. Chances are that they will only need that. Where they read on: it's mostly what they already know. Half may know little or nothing about the DI or the sentence the Introduction starts off with so to them it's basic biology that includes memory systems and instinctual behaviors with a way to qualify systems by machine learning standards as intelligent, should be no big deal.

I ended up alone in the comments, sharing their pain. But at least I had found a whole other world that does not like Larry much anyway and where my actions were more likely somewhat heroic. It is not necessary to have lab funding at stake to be personally inconvenienced by slowdowns in emerging scientific fields. Otherwise "where's your evidence?" sounds like a good argument even though when none yet exists either way (or worse does exist but the questioner ignores it) the tactic is just a brutal science-stopper.

It eventually seemed like a good time to end my string of responses with a link to the ID theory blog. In my case it's something that comes last, not before, all else it relies upon. In this case that's especially true for the need of a functional understanding the RNA mediated molecular dynamics of genetic systems. So I made a stand for that, not the "Theory of Intelligent Design" that added some indication of how culture changing their future research might become, without their ever even having to read a word of the ID theory. They are already on the right path, with me right behind visibly taking a beating to help them widen it for those following right behind me.

In a scientific arena what most matters is how helpful a theory is, for explaining how something works. Or in this case where it's mostly a "Why get upset over that?" sort of thing that maybe in the future makes their efforts culturally heroic then they would want me to make sure to not be shy and add that in too, for good measure. Helps show why by Discovery Institute and UD standards their work deserves to be considered sacred. Especially after their claiming that their theory predicts more function than Larry believes but with that mostly taken on faith did not have a testable model/theory to explain why essentially true, but I did, with a circuit that can easily exist at the molecular level that cannot be ruled in our out. There's a knowledge void making it impossible to test things that I should be able to test, to find out either way. Thousands of new RNA's with the reported functions does not complicate things, it simplifies them.

Tonight I am in no envy of fishing reel analogies and all the rest being posted at websites that serious researchers don't have time or need to bother with. What interests them though is what professors are blogging about their work and how that went in comments. So with all considered: I'm all set with just that, thank you.

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The theory of intelligent design holds that certain features of the universe and of living things are best explained by an intelligent cause, not an undirected process such as natural selection.

   
coldfirephoenix



Posts: 60
Joined: Sep. 2017

(Permalink) Posted: Feb. 13 2018,18:38   

Quote
From what I now know the future of "intelligent cause" related theory remains dependant upon the (still alive and doing well) RNA World, going on inside cells. Larry apparently still maintains his opinion that it should be considered "junk" but we're only two months into 2018 and there are already over 1000 new papers regarding lncRNA function:


Okay, so Gary heard the term "RNA World", and decided to mix it into his word salad without understanding it.
RNA World decribes the (hypothetical) conditions on earth that were a precursor to the first DNA molecules. The term has nothing to do with what's going on in Cells right now. It has also nothing to do with the link you are apparantly referring to....

But that is rather irrelevant, because your "intelligent cause theory" - just like any intelligent design hypothesis - remains dependant on you being able to show any connection to observable reality and to being able to show scientific methodology. Neither of which you or any creationist has ever done. So don't worry, RNA World (whatever you may think that is) is the least of your concerns.

  
ChemiCat



Posts: 521
Joined: Nov. 2013

(Permalink) Posted: Feb. 14 2018,04:04   

Coldfire,

Gaulin is a typical creationist. Anything discovered by genuine scientific researchers automatically becomes part of his 'theory'.
Usually with a sneering "I told you so, read my "scientific theory", I predicted this there".

Gaulin is so steeped in myth and magic he cannot understand why the scientific community reject his crazy ideas.

  
ChemiCat



Posts: 521
Joined: Nov. 2013

(Permalink) Posted: Feb. 14 2018,04:07   

I somehow missed this one;

 
Quote
A new (and very invasive) species of crayfish has been reported:


These crayfish will be added to the salmon and alligators in his theory in 3...2...

Then his Pacman variant will gain two claws.

  
GaryGaulin



Posts: 5355
Joined: Oct. 2012

(Permalink) Posted: Feb. 14 2018,06:52   

At Sandwalk I had to reply back to someone who did not seem to know why I was curious about brain development and reproduction related RNA, and developments in neuroscience regarding possible memory function for what can also be called "splice variants". Now I most likely have only one more comment left, after that Larry's kicking me out:

sandwalk.blogspot.com/2018/02/are-splice-variants-functional-or-noise.html?showComment=1518533832272#c3212428335794271141

--------------
The theory of intelligent design holds that certain features of the universe and of living things are best explained by an intelligent cause, not an undirected process such as natural selection.

   
coldfirephoenix



Posts: 60
Joined: Sep. 2017

(Permalink) Posted: Feb. 14 2018,11:33   

Quote (GaryGaulin @ Feb. 14 2018,06:52)
At Sandwalk I had to reply back to someone who did not seem to know why I was curious about brain development and reproduction related RNA, and developments in neuroscience regarding possible memory function for what can also be called "splice variants". Now I most likely have only one more comment left, after that Larry's kicking me out:

sandwalk.blogspot.com/2018/02/are-splice-variants-functional-or-noise.html?showComment=1518533832272#c3212428335794271141

Why would you announce this here? This is not a good thing for you, this actively makes you look bad! You are basically loudly proclaiming:

"Look, another scientist told me that I am just talking gibberish and don't understand science! I think I should share this with the forum that has told me countless times that I am just talking gibberish and don't understand science!"


Do you seriously not get how conversation works? Or did you understand all of that and decided to do it anyway?

And only 3 posts after I told you that you were completely misusing terminology, which you have obviously just heard somewhere and didn't comprehend. Did you post that just to prove me right? Was that your way of giving me a gift?

  
ChemiCat



Posts: 521
Joined: Nov. 2013

(Permalink) Posted: Feb. 14 2018,16:40   

Which part of this didn't you understand, Gaulin.

Quote
@Gary Gaulin

You have already been warned once about spamming my blog with your kooky ideas. This is your second warning.


"Kooky" doesn't mean biscuits. It means stupid, stupid.

  
GaryGaulin



Posts: 5355
Joined: Oct. 2012

(Permalink) Posted: Feb. 14 2018,23:44   

Quote (coldfirephoenix @ Feb. 14 2018,11:33)
     
Quote (GaryGaulin @ Feb. 14 2018,06:52)
At Sandwalk I had to reply back to someone who did not seem to know why I was curious about brain development and reproduction related RNA, and developments in neuroscience regarding possible memory function for what can also be called "splice variants". Now I most likely have only one more comment left, after that Larry's kicking me out:

sandwalk.blogspot.com/2018/02/are-splice-variants-functional-or-noise.html?showComment=1518533832272#c3212428335794271141

Why would you announce this here? This is not a good thing for you, this actively makes you look bad!
...............
Did you post that just to prove me right? Was that your way of giving me a gift?


My example helped show who the leaders in science discovery now are. Larry and others are now retired. It's not surprising to find the younger generations carrying on the tradition of searching for what past leaders might have missed. Teach your children well.

Now that you mentioned my giving you a gift, even though it's last minute: Happy Valentine's Day! You too ChemiCat!

Your smooch of a surprise is that the second part of this (actually lovely for a change) article goes into brain development:

evolutionnews.org/2018/02/more-secret-codes-in-junk-dna/

That sure beats another spat with Larry that makes all "scientists" look bad. So big improvement eh?

With this being a special occasion that has had the following song looping in my mind all day (and it's the thought that counts) I have one more gift to add:

Natasha Bedingfield - Unwritten
www.youtube.com/watch?v=b7k0a5hYnSI

Once in a great while the Discovery Institute does something worth singing about. I think they/we deserved that song. Larry please lighten up.

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The theory of intelligent design holds that certain features of the universe and of living things are best explained by an intelligent cause, not an undirected process such as natural selection.

   
coldfirephoenix



Posts: 60
Joined: Sep. 2017

(Permalink) Posted: Feb. 15 2018,18:53   

Quote
My example helped show who the leaders in science discovery now are. Larry and others are now retired. It's not surprising to find the younger generations carrying on the tradition of searching for what past leaders might have missed.


This might be the most delusional self-aggrandizing I have ever heard.

And no, it does not "show who the leaders in science discovery now are".
The mental gymnastics to arrive at such a conclusion are breathtaking!

How do you get from
"scientist tells internet-troll that his ideas are stupid"

to

"proof that internet troll is now leading authority in science discovery" ???

Did you seriously just start out with the assumption that your nonsense is correct > therefore if someone calls it stupid, they are obviously wrong > therefore such a person would not be a good scientist > therefore you are a better scientist (> therefore your nonsense is correct)?

Is this the "logic" behind this? Because of the life of me, I can't see anything else how your mind could somehow turn someone calling you a dumbass into vindication of your dumbass ideas?



(As a side note: "The younger generation"? For some reason, I thought you were like 60, which would put you in the same generation as laurence moran... This has absolutely nothing to do with anything, your argument is stupid even if you are 20. Just curious.)

  
fnxtr



Posts: 2904
Joined: June 2006

(Permalink) Posted: Feb. 15 2018,20:04   

Well he's said before that he's been tweaking his Roomba for FORTY YEARS...

--------------
"[A] book said there were 5 trillion witnesses. Who am I supposed to believe, 5 trillion witnesses or you? That shit's, like, ironclad. " -- stevestory

"Wow, you must be retarded. I said that CO2 does not trap heat. If it did then it would not cool down at night."  Joe G

  
ChemiCat



Posts: 521
Joined: Nov. 2013

(Permalink) Posted: Feb. 17 2018,04:01   

Quote
My example helped show who the leaders in science discovery now are.


You, KF, Barry Arrogant, Chubs and Klinkleklopper are leaders of scientific discovery?... let me stop laughing first...

That's better now I've wiped the tears off the keyboard.

I'm surprised that you can even work out how to get out of your basement let alone be a leader in science discovery... sorry started laughing uncontrollably again... and again.

  
ChemiCat



Posts: 521
Joined: Nov. 2013

(Permalink) Posted: Feb. 17 2018,04:04   

Quote
Well he's said before that he's been tweaking his Roomba for FORTY YEARS...


That explains why he's blind but where does the stupidity come from?

Oh, I get it now...

  
GaryGaulin



Posts: 5355
Joined: Oct. 2012

(Permalink) Posted: Feb. 17 2018,10:26   

Quote (ChemiCat @ Feb. 17 2018,04:01)
Quote
My example helped show who the leaders in science discovery now are.


You, KF, Barry Arrogant, Chubs and Klinkleklopper are leaders of scientific discovery?...

Modern leaders:

matticklab.com/index.php?title=Research

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The theory of intelligent design holds that certain features of the universe and of living things are best explained by an intelligent cause, not an undirected process such as natural selection.

   
ChemiCat



Posts: 521
Joined: Nov. 2013

(Permalink) Posted: Feb. 18 2018,04:52   

Quote
The Mattick lab currently has availabilities for prospective Honour's, Master's or PhD projects through UNSW. If you are interested in such undertakings, please send your CV, academic transcripts as well as a summary of your research interests to one of the following lab members:


Here's your big chance, Gaulin.

Go for it!

ps this has nothing at all to do with your pseudoscience.

  
N.Wells



Posts: 1828
Joined: Oct. 2005

(Permalink) Posted: Feb. 18 2018,06:48   

Quote
I have a model that stands on its own merit that makes the ID theory possible, not the other way around.


BS, Gary.  Your model does not "stand on its own", because it sits on a pile of hogwash and errors.  You don't show design, you don't invoke intelligence in a way that anyone but you understands, and you don't understand what a theory is.  Therefore, linking your ideas unnecessarily to a pile of religious garbage is an unwise strategy for gaining success in science.  

It is true that inspiration can come from anywhere in science, even from religion, but thinking up an idea does not immediately bring the idea into science.  Even if the idea is completely convincing to the person who makes it correct, that does not make it reasonable for anyone else.

Your definitions are crap (you misuse existing terms and fail to supply valid alternative definitions).  You don't supply valid arguments or data supporting your ideas.  You have no ground-truthing, you make irrelevant claims that are factually wrong, and you don't understand scientific methods and terminology.  This does not give you credibility, or inspire anyone to give you the benefit of the doubt, or persuade anyone in your desired audience to search for whatever gold may be hidden in all your dross.

  
GaryGaulin



Posts: 5355
Joined: Oct. 2012

(Permalink) Posted: Feb. 18 2018,14:46   

Quote (coldfirephoenix @ Feb. 15 2018,18:53)
(As a side note: "The younger generation"? For some reason, I thought you were like 60, which would put you in the same generation as laurence moran... This has absolutely nothing to do with anything, your argument is stupid even if you are 20. Just curious.)

My having a month ago turned 61 has only given me a greater wealth of useful experience in this matter. I recall two college freshmen from long ago with a passion for trace fossils who are now themselves well enough seasoned, who were back then beginning to find evidence at my tracksite that indicated herds of dinosaurs were not passing through the area they instead stayed to feed on periodically flood delivered fish trapped in a giant rift valley lake with no outlet that then dried up. After new layers of sedimentation buried the old layers deep enough to get pressed into stone geological uprising and glacial erosion caused the valley floor to end up here on this mountain range, where I live. Their discoveries filled in fascinating detail that adds dinosaurs walking parallel to the shoreline of a valley lake full of easy pickings, which was a total change from the old assumptions of just passing through during migration. I have a trackway that's likely of the same dinosaur following their exact path back the opposite way, which was unexpected and a long time ago may have seemed kooky to claim to have found, but not any more.

The experiment causing slime molds to ahead of time prepare for a periodic blast of cold dry air type shock is now routine. A modern authority on that looks like:

Heather Barnett: What humans can learn from semi-intelligent slime
www.youtube.com/watch?v=2UxGrde1NDA

I'm not bothered by rope connected treehuggers getting in touch with their inner cells by networking out as neural networks and such by following the most basic communication rules they live by, learn their language. Looks fun.

It's now known that even the common biofilm forming cells of many kinds even share RNA and DNA through their network that for cells is a neighbor to neighbor internet through which they communicate all sorts of "junk" to each other, to figure out. Also, testes cells are from what I read especially interconnected this way. And Larry sure does not seem to know why.

Instead of trying to keep up with the flood of new information (and what's required to computer model such functions) Larry has been busy promoting his side of the philosophical "looks designed to me" debate for those who prefer to have a religious discussion:

sandwalk.blogspot.ca/2018/02/human-genome-books.html

I have better things to do than immerse myself in books like that. I'm now implementing the new array structure for the ID Lab. All sensilla from all body parts will now map along the surface of a cortical sheet (cerebral cortex), one for each of the two bilateral sides. These in turn address the spike train episodic RAM that fills with both good and bad memories played back when similar conditions exist again. It's time to get back to work on it!

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The theory of intelligent design holds that certain features of the universe and of living things are best explained by an intelligent cause, not an undirected process such as natural selection.

   
Jim_Wynne



Posts: 1205
Joined: June 2006

(Permalink) Posted: Feb. 18 2018,16:02   

Quote (GaryGaulin @ Feb. 18 2018,14:46)
All sensilla from all body parts will now map along the surface of a cortical sheet (cerebral cortex), one for each of the two bilateral sides.

I'm not a biologist, but I think sensilla are present in invertebrates, primarily arthropods, and there are no invertebrates that have a cerebral cortex.  Also, "...each of the two bilateral sides" indicates that there are four "cortical sheet[s]" as both sides are bilateral.  I have a feeling that this was not what you intended to say, but who knows?  You need to learn to write more better.

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Evolution is not about laws but about randomness on happanchance.--Robert Byers, at PT

  
GaryGaulin



Posts: 5355
Joined: Oct. 2012

(Permalink) Posted: Feb. 18 2018,18:48   

Quote (Jim_Wynne @ Feb. 18 2018,16:02)
 
Quote (GaryGaulin @ Feb. 18 2018,14:46)
All sensilla from all body parts will now map along the surface of a cortical sheet (cerebral cortex), one for each of the two bilateral sides.

I'm not a biologist, but I think sensilla are present in invertebrates, primarily arthropods, and there are no invertebrates that have a cerebral cortex.  Also, "...each of the two bilateral sides" indicates that there are four "cortical sheet[s]" as both sides are bilateral.  I have a feeling that this was not what you intended to say, but who knows?  


Or in other words: a bilateral animal has a left and right side, each side controlled by a 2 hemisphere brain with one cortical sheet per hemisphere mapping out somatosensory like this:

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Primary_somatosensory_cortex

In code I use the prefix "Sns" for SeNSory receptors that can also be as in robotics called a SeNSor, while SeNSilla is another possibility I occasionally used in program comments to indicate nothing fancy is required. But yes where you quibble you can argue it's technically not precise enough, bad me.

Quote (Jim_Wynne @ Feb. 18 2018,16:02)
You need to learn to write more better.


I'll try to write more well. Twas jest me quirks.

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The theory of intelligent design holds that certain features of the universe and of living things are best explained by an intelligent cause, not an undirected process such as natural selection.

   
N.Wells



Posts: 1828
Joined: Oct. 2005

(Permalink) Posted: Feb. 18 2018,19:18   

Quote (Jim_Wynne @ Feb. 18 2018,16:02)
 
Quote (GaryGaulin @ Feb. 18 2018,14:46)
All sensilla from all body parts will now map along the surface of a cortical sheet (cerebral cortex), one for each of the two bilateral sides.

I'm not a biologist, but I think sensilla are present in invertebrates, primarily arthropods, and there are no invertebrates that have a cerebral cortex.  Also, "...each of the two bilateral sides" indicates that there are four "cortical sheet[s]" as both sides are bilateral.  I have a feeling that this was not what you intended to say, but who knows?  You need to learn to write more better.


Arthropods have mushroom bodies rather than hippocampi (which are part of the cerebral cortex), but that hasn't given Gary pause to reconsider his language or his claims since forever.  Recent research suggests that hippocampi and mushroom bodies in ragworms may have a common evolutionary origin in something much simpler in the distant past, but presenting a model that claims to depict how the hippocampus functions in an arthropod is giggle-worthy.

  
Henry J



Posts: 5106
Joined: Mar. 2005

(Permalink) Posted: Feb. 18 2018,20:34   

Re "Arthropods have mushroom bodies"

Is that what makes them such fun guys?

  
ChemiCat



Posts: 521
Joined: Nov. 2013

(Permalink) Posted: Feb. 19 2018,06:57   

Here you go, Gaulin, should save you a lot of trouble.

Robot

No need for your Pacman-type now.

  
GaryGaulin



Posts: 5355
Joined: Oct. 2012

(Permalink) Posted: Mar. 12 2018,07:55   

Science recently lost another good man. His recent work with Patrick Getty and others can be found on Google Scholar:

Quote
Robert G. Sproule Jr., age 67 of Plymouth passed away at Beth Israel Deaconess Hospital in Plymouth, MA on February 21, 2018. He was the beloved husband of Joyce (Ogden) Sproule. He was the brother of  Betsy Hundertmark of Afton, Minnesota, Susan Anecki of Buffalo, Minnesota,  Frederick Sproule of East Bridgewater, MA, and George Sproule of Vero Beach, Florida,  He also leaves many nieces and nephews including Kelly and Timothy Sheehan of Wrentham, MA.

Robert was born in Peterborough, NH on June 15, 1950 to Robert and Lois (Austin) Sproule. Shortly after graduation Robert began college which was temporarily put on hold while he entered the United States Army where he served as a military police officer during the Vietnam war. Upon his honorable discharge from the Army, Robert was able to return to college, where he received a Bachelor’s Degree from Bridgewater State College. Robert also worked as a USPS letter carrier for 10 years, serving the town of Rockland, MA. In his later years he taught Earth Science at Quincy and Mashpee High Schools.  Thirty five years of his life were spent as a bass player and singer for the Ronnie Lewis and the Expedition Band.  Robert’s passion was finding, collecting, and researching minerals and fossils. He was past president and member of the Southeastern Massachusetts Mineral Club and the Rhode Island Mineral Hunters Club. Some of his mineral and fossil finds are prominently displayed at area museums, such as the Museum of Comparative Zoology at Harvard University and the Springfield Science Museum in Springfield, Massachusetts. Among his many remarkable scientific discoveries was the one-of-a-kind body imprint of a larval mayfly that he named Narragansettichnus fortunatus, which now resides in the collection of the Peabody Museum of Natural History at Yale University. One of Robert’s proudest accomplishments was unearthing not one, but two of the earliest winged insect fossils ever found. Robert worked closely with paleontologists to get his discoveries published and he authored scientific papers in renowned journals such as Palaios and Atlantic Geology.


I was looking forward to Bob again being here this Summer, to identify more traces that Chris and miss due to not always knowing what to look for. The Christmas cards he and Joyce sent me are still in with my fossil collection containing trilobites and such that were given to me by others, as gifts.

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The theory of intelligent design holds that certain features of the universe and of living things are best explained by an intelligent cause, not an undirected process such as natural selection.

   
coldfirephoenix



Posts: 60
Joined: Sep. 2017

(Permalink) Posted: Mar. 13 2018,20:20   

Wait, am I going crazy? Were some of the most recent posts deleted?

I distinctly remember there being a comment from one of you guys about this bit of gaulinese-gibberish:

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I'm not bothered by rope connected treehuggers getting in touch with their inner cells by networking out as neural networks and such by following the most basic communication rules they live by, learn their language.


(Also, we are just gonna ignore his delusions that he's a scientist, because he once shook hands with an actual scientist, right? I don't know why, but I find his way of talking about them as if they were collagues and equals highly disrespectful.)

  
stevestory



Posts: 11046
Joined: Oct. 2005

(Permalink) Posted: Mar. 13 2018,20:44   

I only ever delete spam comments.

   
stevestory



Posts: 11046
Joined: Oct. 2005

(Permalink) Posted: Mar. 13 2018,20:53   

Quote (coldfirephoenix @ Mar. 13 2018,21:20)
(Also, we are just gonna ignore his delusions that he's a scientist, because he once shook hands with an actual scientist, right? I don't know why, but I find his way of talking about them as if they were collagues and equals highly disrespectful.)

Don't get bent out of shape about that--Gary thinks he's a scientist investigating a new theory the same way Teddy Daniels thinks he's a U.S. Marshall investigating a murder at Shelter Island. You can get mad about it, but it won't fix the problem.

   
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