Printable Version of Topic

-Antievolution.org Discussion Board
+--Forum: After the Bar Closes...
+---Topic: Libations and Comestibles started by stevestory


Posted by: stevestory on June 07 2007,18:04

Might as well have an explicit post about booze.
Posted by: stevestory on June 07 2007,18:04

Issue Number 1:

I'm currently drinking a Red Hook ESB ale. It's kind of thick and fruity. Discuss.
Posted by: argystokes on June 07 2007,18:13

Quote (stevestory @ June 07 2007,16:04)
Issue Number 1:

I'm currently drinking a Red Hook ESB ale. It's kind of thick and fruity. Discuss.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Red Hook's best brew IMO is their Copper Hook, formerly named Chinook. Normally I don't like sweet beers much, but that's a good seasonal brew.

Apparently Red Hook has a brewery tour that costs a buck, and nets you 5 small beers. It's something that's kind of permanently been on my agenda to do, but I've never gotten around to.
Posted by: Albatrossity2 on June 07 2007,18:52

Sounds good. I'm currently drinking an Avery (Boulder, CO) IPA. Not too hoppy, lovely copper color, and a nice "nose".

Whilst traveling in the American Southwest recently, we found a shop in Las Cruces NM that sold the Stone IPA. I had never had it, I had only had their < Arrogant Bastard Ale > once while visiting in SoCal. That was excellent, so I bought a six-pack of their IPA in Las Cruces. I wish I had tasted it there; I would have brought back a case or two...
Posted by: carlsonjok on June 07 2007,19:01

Quote (stevestory @ June 07 2007,18:04)
Issue Number 1:

I'm currently drinking a Red Hook ESB ale. It's kind of thick and fruity. Discuss.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Thick and Fruity.  Initials R.H.  Man, I have this feeling that there is a joke in there somewhere, but I just can't seem to place it.  ;)

I'm not drinking anything right at the moment, as I have a lawn to mow.  But I do have a 2002 Familia Zuccardi Malbec that I am itching to pop the cork on.
Posted by: stevestory on June 07 2007,19:10

Quote (carlsonjok @ June 07 2007,20:01)

I'm not drinking anything right at the moment, as I have a lawn to mow.  
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Non Sequitur.
Posted by: Robert O'Brien on June 07 2007,19:31

Jack Daniels is nice on rare occasions.
Posted by: Richardthughes on June 07 2007,19:37

Quote (carlsonjok @ June 07 2007,19:01)
Quote (stevestory @ June 07 2007,18:04)
Issue Number 1:

I'm currently drinking a Red Hook ESB ale. It's kind of thick and fruity. Discuss.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Thick and Fruity.  Initials R.H.  Man, I have this feeling that there is a joke in there somewhere, but I just can't seem to place it.  ;)

I'm not drinking anything right at the moment, as I have a lawn to mow.  But I do have a 2002 Familia Zuccardi Malbec that I am itching to pop the cork on.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


3 FRUITS COMMONLY MISTAKED FOR VEGETABLES


TOMATO
CUCUMBER
CARLSONJOK

:angry:
Posted by: someotherguy on June 07 2007,20:55

Quote (stevestory @ June 07 2007,19:10)
Quote (carlsonjok @ June 07 2007,20:01)

I'm not drinking anything right at the moment, as I have a lawn to mow.  
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Non Sequitur.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


It's funny 'cuz it's true.
Posted by: Rev. BigDumbChimp on June 07 2007,21:04

Just had a bottle of Golden Monkey Tripel and now i've moved on to a Jack Daniels on the rocks.
Posted by: carlsonjok on June 07 2007,21:09

Quote (stevestory @ June 07 2007,19:10)
Quote (carlsonjok @ June 07 2007,20:01)

I'm not drinking anything right at the moment, as I have a lawn to mow.  
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Non Sequitur.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Booze tastes better if its consumption is postponed until after some hard work.  As it is, I left the Malbec in the rack and I am drinking a Concha y Toro Cab/Merlot blend.  Not bad for a $6 table wine aged in stainless rather than oak.  The Reisling ice wine chilling in the fridge is going to be a nice nightcap.
Posted by: blipey on June 07 2007,21:19

Quote (Albatrossity2 @ June 07 2007,18:52)
Sounds good. I'm currently drinking an Avery (Boulder, CO) IPA. Not too hoppy, lovely copper color, and a nice "nose".
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


How is this possible?  Did they not get the recipe from an Englishman?
Posted by: argystokes on June 07 2007,21:30

Quote (Richardthughes @ June 07 2007,17:37)
Quote (carlsonjok @ June 07 2007,19:01)
Quote (stevestory @ June 07 2007,18:04)
Issue Number 1:

I'm currently drinking a Red Hook ESB ale. It's kind of thick and fruity. Discuss.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Thick and Fruity.  Initials R.H.  Man, I have this feeling that there is a joke in there somewhere, but I just can't seem to place it.  ;)

I'm not drinking anything right at the moment, as I have a lawn to mow.  But I do have a 2002 Familia Zuccardi Malbec that I am itching to pop the cork on.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


3 FRUITS COMMONLY MISTAKED FOR VEGETABLES


TOMATO
CUCUMBER
CARLSONJOK

:angry:
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Excuse me, but according to the United States Supreme Court, a tomato is a vegetable:


---------------------QUOTE-------------------
Nix v. Hedden, 149 U.S. 304 (1893)[1], was a case in which the United States Supreme Court addressed whether a tomato was classified as a fruit or a vegetable under the Tariff Act of March 3, 1883, which required a tax to be paid on imported vegetables, but not fruit. The case was filed as an action by John Nix, John W. Nix, George W. Nix, and Frank W. Nix against Edward L. Hedden, collector of the port of New York, to recover back duties paid under protest... the court unanimously ruled in favor of the defendant, that the Tariff Act used the ordinary meaning of the words "fruit" and "vegetable"—where a tomato is classified as a vegetable.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Posted by: blipey on June 07 2007,21:40

As for the sweeter beers, I like them as well, though I can't just pound them down like some others either.  A list of some nice sweeter beers I like:

Old Engine Oil (Harvestoun Brewery; Dollar, Scotland)  A fine example of a Scottish Ale: burnt caramel, fairly malty.

Kelpie (New Alloa Brewery; Kelliebank, UK) While not strictly a sweet ale, this has a chocolate palate that is nice.  Sold in the US under the Froach Historic Ales label.

Rochefort #10 (Rochefort Trappist Brewery, Belgium)  a stupendous beer, get some if you can.  You'll probably have to order directly from the brewery (and live in an alcohol in the mail friendly state), but your finer liquor stores may be able to get it in as well.  A very complex beer, very malty.  My favorite part is the port wine and dried fruit flavor.  My least favorite part?  The silly European 375 ml bottle--not even 3/4 of a pint!
Posted by: Rev. BigDumbChimp on June 07 2007,22:06

While the Jack on the rocks are going down nicely, I'm thinking of checking out the new 2012 Olympic logo for a free seziure buzz
Posted by: BWE on June 07 2007,22:13

Well, I kid you not, I'm drinking a Hamms. $6 for a 12 pack.
Posted by: BWE on June 07 2007,22:15

Quote (carlsonjok @ June 07 2007,21:09)
Quote (stevestory @ June 07 2007,19:10)
Quote (carlsonjok @ June 07 2007,20:01)

I'm not drinking anything right at the moment, as I have a lawn to mow.  
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Non Sequitur.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Booze tastes better if its consumption is postponed until after some hard work.  As it is, I left the Malbec in the rack and I am drinking a Concha y Toro Cab/Merlot blend.  Not bad for a $6 table wine aged in stainless rather than oak.  The Reisling ice wine chilling in the fridge is going to be a nice nightcap.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Did you see idiocracy? The doctor's diagnosis.
Posted by: stevestory on June 07 2007,22:19


Posted by: stevestory on June 07 2007,22:20

I'm not going to spoil it, but for those who've seen Idiocracy, BWE's comment is pretty funny.
Posted by: snoeman on June 07 2007,22:21

Quote (stevestory @ June 07 2007,18:04)
Issue Number 1:

I'm currently drinking a Red Hook ESB ale. It's kind of thick and fruity. Discuss.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Didn't realize that Red Hook had made it out there to the East Coast.  The Red Hook brewery that argystokes mentioned is about 10 miles outside of Seattle.  It's sited near a slough that has a bike trail that's very popular on the weekends.  The bicyclists riding north toward the brewery ride in much straighter lines than those riding south away from it...

:)
Posted by: stevestory on June 07 2007,22:21

Quote (BWE @ June 07 2007,23:13)
Well, I kid you not, I'm drinking a Hamms. $6 for a 12 pack.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


At the local food lion you can get a 6 pack of Schlitz for $2.09.
Posted by: argystokes on June 08 2007,00:46

Quote (snoeman @ June 07 2007,20:21)
Quote (stevestory @ June 07 2007,18:04)
Issue Number 1:

I'm currently drinking a Red Hook ESB ale. It's kind of thick and fruity. Discuss.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Didn't realize that Red Hook had made it out there to the East Coast.  The Red Hook brewery that argystokes mentioned is about 10 miles outside of Seattle.  It's sited near a slough that has a bike trail that's very popular on the weekends.  The bicyclists riding north toward the brewery ride in much straighter lines than those riding south away from it...

:)
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Red Hook was partially bought by Anheuser-Busch. That happened roundabouts the time I started drinking beer, so I'm not sure if the quality suffered (though I'm told it didn't).
Posted by: carlsonjok on June 08 2007,03:41

Quote (BWE @ June 07 2007,22:15)
Did you see idiocracy? The doctor's diagnosis.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Yes, I did, but the movie didn't make much of an impression on me, so I am drawing a blank.  Feel free to PM me if you don't wish to spoil it for others.
Posted by: "Rev Dr" Lenny Flank on June 08 2007,07:17

The best beer ever:





:)
Posted by: snoeman on June 08 2007,07:59

Quote (argystokes @ June 08 2007,00:46)
Quote (snoeman @ June 07 2007,20:21)
Quote (stevestory @ June 07 2007,18:04)
Issue Number 1:

I'm currently drinking a Red Hook ESB ale. It's kind of thick and fruity. Discuss.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Didn't realize that Red Hook had made it out there to the East Coast.  The Red Hook brewery that argystokes mentioned is about 10 miles outside of Seattle.  It's sited near a slough that has a bike trail that's very popular on the weekends.  The bicyclists riding north toward the brewery ride in much straighter lines than those riding south away from it...

:)
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Red Hook was partially bought by Anheuser-Busch. That happened roundabouts the time I started drinking beer, so I'm not sure if the quality suffered (though I'm told it didn't).
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Having had Red Hook both pre- and post-acquisition by Anheuser Busch, I can report that quality did not suffer.  I just hadn't recalled seeing it in any stores off of the West Coast...
Posted by: Richardthughes on June 08 2007,10:33

Leffe Blonde
PBR


I bet Kristinie likes Chimay.
Posted by: Arden Chatfield on June 08 2007,10:45

Quote (stevestory @ June 07 2007,22:21)
Quote (BWE @ June 07 2007,23:13)
Well, I kid you not, I'm drinking a Hamms. $6 for a 12 pack.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


At the local food lion you can get a 6 pack of Schlitz for $2.09.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Ouch.
Posted by: J-Dog on June 08 2007,10:58

Piss on all Big American Brewrys and their products, but I tried a Sam Adams Pale Ale last weekend - It sucked.

I should stick with Guiness, but I know I will continue to sample micro-products, so thanks for the tips on sips.

My best recommendation, a French wine, Louis Jadot Beaujolais that only costs @ $10 a bottle.  Mmmmm good.
Posted by: The Wayward Hammer on June 08 2007,21:32

Sorry, but I hate Beaujolais with a passion.  Get a real red wine, dammit.  I take particular pleasure in decent cheap wine.  Zabaco Dancing Bull Zinfandel.  Hess Select Chardonay if you must have a white.  OK, actually I would go with the Chateau St. Michelle Riesling for a white.

Pinot Noir has become so overpriced now.  I used to get Saintsbury Carneros for a decent price, but it went over $25 a bottle last I saw it and it's not worth that.  I think the Australian Shiraz's (Penfold's is actually good for being really cheap) have taken that spot now in my portfolio.  OTOH, I have bought the French Rabbit Pinot in the little one liter container and I was pleasantly surprised.  But it is just a simple drinkable wine.

And I haven't had a bad Malbec yet.  Some can get a little chalky, but I don't mind that.  

Give me a good Zin and a decent Chicago style Canadian bacon pizza and I am a happy man.  Damn, now I'm hungry and need a drink.
Posted by: Richardthughes on June 08 2007,22:05

Quote (The Wayward Hammer @ June 08 2007,21:32)
Sorry, but I hate Beaujolais with a passion.  Get a real red wine, dammit.  I take particular pleasure in decent cheap wine.  Zabaco Dancing Bull Zinfandel.  Hess Select Chardonay if you must have a white.  OK, actually I would go with the Chateau St. Michelle Riesling for a white.

Pinot Noir has become so overpriced now.  I used to get Saintsbury Carneros for a decent price, but it went over $25 a bottle last I saw it and it's not worth that.  I think the Australian Shiraz's (Penfold's is actually good for being really cheap) have taken that spot now in my portfolio.  OTOH, I have bought the French Rabbit Pinot in the little one liter container and I was pleasantly surprised.  But it is just a simple drinkable wine.

And I haven't had a bad Malbec yet.  Some can get a little chalky, but I don't mind that.  

Give me a good Zin and a decent Chicago style Canadian bacon pizza and I am a happy man.  Damn, now I'm hungry and need a drink.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Chateau D'Yquem.

'nuff said.
Posted by: carlsonjok on June 08 2007,22:43

Quote (Richardthughes @ June 08 2007,22:05)
Chateau D'Yquem.

'nuff said.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


FIGURES YOU WOOD LIKE SOMETHING MADE BY CHEEZ-EATIN' SURRENDER MUNKY FURRNERS INSTEAD OF A GOOD BOX OF AMERICAN WINE.  USA! USA!

CHATEAU D' HOMO, MORE LIKE IT.
Posted by: Richardthughes on June 08 2007,22:54

ANNONGRAM:

AN R SOL JOCK.

IT WERKS FONETICALLY.

:angry:
Posted by: Wesley R. Elsberry on June 08 2007,23:14

For a red wine, Diane and I were really taken with the < Saintsbury Pinot Noir >. Of course, context may have had something to do with that: the bottle had been provided by Ira Lee, the vintner who grew the grapes. We were visiting for the opportunity to take the hawks out in his vineyard. They flew around, chased a couple of jackrabbits, and that was about it for the hawks. I had to drive, so I only had a partial glass. Ira kept pressing Diane to have some more, so by the time we got on the road, she was quite tipsy. That was interesting, because she usually has little interest in alcoholic beverages, so I don't see her in that state much, or almost never.

Another winery that we took the hawks to was < Blackwood Canyon > in Benton City, Washington, back in 1993. After Rusty chased around their pheasants a bit, the vintner there gave us an extended private wine-tasting session that included most of what they made at the time, whites and reds, and even a vinegar and something they called "double nickel", a liqueur-like thing that besides having high alcohol content was a 55 on some sugar scale, topping the concentration you find in honey. (Whee, a mere $150 per 375 ml bottle now... at that price, we probably accounted for $5 each worth of just that at our tasting session.) We ended up buying several bottles of a late harvest Riesling there, which made an excellent dessert wine.
Posted by: Albatrossity2 on June 09 2007,04:17

Quote (Richardthughes @ June 08 2007,22:05)
Chateau D'Yquem.

'nuff said.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


So you drink D'Yquem on a regular basis?

I'm definitely gonna come visit!
Posted by: Louis on June 09 2007,07:50



---------------------QUOTE-------------------
So you drink D'Yquem on a regular basis?

I'm definitely gonna come visit!
---------------------QUOTE-------------------



Step back bitch! I saw him first!

But seriously:

Chateau D'Yquem is good if you like dessert wines, sauternes, etc  but I have to say that, whilst I love them, they're hardly a session wine or a frequent drinker. That's not a criticism, more an observation. They are after all GORGEOUS.

Now with wine, one can talk of the big reds, the clarets etc and they have their place (my favourite is Margaux, that region has some of the best terroir in France in my opinion. Ch. Palmer, Ch. Margaux. Love 'em! Ch. Margaux has been owned by the same [Greek origin!!] family for ~40 years and they IMO [and that of a few others] have produced the best red bordeaux in the Medoc for ages. Costs a bit though) one can talk of the New World (sorry boys, but I think you and the Antipodeans over oak the majority of your wines. Oaking disguises the results of poor terroir dontcherknow. That's not to say that the New World wines are all bad, far from it. But our British market is saturated with their cheap end oaked whites and shallow reds, it give is a bad impression) but you cannot beat a glass of Chateau de Chassellier eh Obediah?

Sorry, mum and dad own a restaurant, I grew up with wine, and as wine appreciation has a strong chemistry element, I sort of am kind of erm interested in it.....{trails off as wine geekery is acknowledged}

Louis
Posted by: silverspoon on June 09 2007,08:12

I still have a 38 year old bottle of Ripple wine vintage 1969. It still tastes like it did back them. Vomit!

Budweiser and Jim Beam are a better fit for me these days.
Posted by: Richardthughes on June 09 2007,08:51

Quote (Albatrossity2 @ June 09 2007,04:17)
Quote (Richardthughes @ June 08 2007,22:05)
Chateau D'Yquem.

'nuff said.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


So you drink D'Yquem on a regular basis?

I'm definitely gonna come visit!
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


All are welcome!
Posted by: Ftk on June 09 2007,08:55

[blushing]

Um...Richard, you mailbox is full.  I guess I sent one too many pictures...

[/blushing]
Posted by: Richardthughes on June 09 2007,09:01

Quote (Ftk @ June 09 2007,08:55)
[blushing]

Um...Richard, you mailbox is full.  I guess I sent one too many pictures...

[/blushing]
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


I emptied it for you. That "nurse" one was excellent.

Arden sends me pictures too...

*shudders*  :(
Posted by: carlsonjok on June 09 2007,09:13

Quote (Louis @ June 09 2007,07:50)
Now with wine, one can talk of the big reds, the clarets etc and they have their place (my favourite is Margaux, that region has some of the best terroir in France in my opinion. Ch. Palmer, Ch. Margaux. Love 'em!
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Back in the early 1990s, on the advice of a friend, I put away a few bottles of Margaux.  I finally opened a 1989 Prieure-Lichine last year and it was fabulous. I have a couple of 1988s that I am eyeing laviciously and a 2001 that I just stored away.  I've just gotten back into wine recently and wish I had a chance at a 2000, but they are likely out of the range of my wallet now.

I can only imagine what a Grand Cru like Ch. Margaux must be like. There isn't much market for high-end stuff like that in Oklahoma, and what is here is usually from California.
Posted by: Albatrossity2 on June 09 2007,10:44

Quote (Louis @ June 09 2007,07:50)
But seriously:

Chateau D'Yquem is good if you like dessert wines, sauternes, etc  but I have to say that, whilst I love them, they're hardly a session wine or a frequent drinker. That's not a criticism, more an observation. They are after all GORGEOUS.

Now with wine, one can talk of the big reds, the clarets etc and they have their place (my favourite is Margaux, that region has some of the best terroir in France in my opinion. Ch. Palmer, Ch. Margaux. Love 'em! Ch. Margaux has been owned by the same [Greek origin!!] family for ~40 years and they IMO [and that of a few others] have produced the best red bordeaux in the Medoc for ages. Costs a bit though) one can talk of the New World (sorry boys, but I think you and the Antipodeans over oak the majority of your wines. Oaking disguises the results of poor terroir dontcherknow. That's not to say that the New World wines are all bad, far from it. But our British market is saturated with their cheap end oaked whites and shallow reds, it give is a bad impression) but you cannot beat a glass of Chateau de Chassellier eh Obediah?

Sorry, mum and dad own a restaurant, I grew up with wine, and as wine appreciation has a strong chemistry element, I sort of am kind of erm interested in it.....{trails off as wine geekery is acknowledged}

Louis
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Well sure, but when the price in Kansas is $180 for a split of D'Yquem from a good (not great) vintage, I'll make an exception. Hell, I'll even cook a dessert. I like a nice vanilla flan with Sauternes, and I have an excellent (Cuban) recipe for flan.

I agree with you about the Margaux, even if it was Richard Nixon's favorite wine. They are damn pricey over here though. While I was a post doc (late 1970's) I was fortunate enough to fall into a wine-tasting group in St. Louis, and one of the members was a very wealthy M.D. He treated us all to a vertical tasting of Ch. Margaux. My tasting notes indicate that we had the 1949, 1953, 1955, 1959 and 1961. The '49 and '53 were stunning, the '55 was not as good and was starting to fade, and the '59 and '61 were eminently drinkable, but probably would get even better with a few more years in bottle. I often wonder what that tasting cost him!

Even so, I have to say that my favorite red of all time was a 1959 Richebourg, which I had in the mid 1980's sometime. I haven't been able to drink any domestic pinot noirs since...

The St. Louis M.D.  would also regularly fly to London to pick up wines at auction from the estates of deceased (probably cirrhosis) Brits. The best thing that I can recall from one of those excursions was a port. Vintage 1899. Yeah, a port from the 19th century. It had faded to a tawny color, but it still tasted fine.

But the-wine-tasting options here in Manhattan KS are not quite up to that caliber, alas. And neither is my budget..
Posted by: snoeman on June 09 2007,11:43

Quote (Wesley R. Elsberry @ June 08 2007,23:14)
For a red wine, Diane and I were really taken with the < Saintsbury Pinot Noir >. Of course, context may have had something to do with that: the bottle had been provided by Ira Lee, the vintner who grew the grapes. We were visiting for the opportunity to take the hawks out in his vineyard. They flew around, chased a couple of jackrabbits, and that was about it for the hawks. I had to drive, so I only had a partial glass. Ira kept pressing Diane to have some more, so by the time we got on the road, she was quite tipsy. That was interesting, because she usually has little interest in alcoholic beverages, so I don't see her in that state much, or almost never.

Another winery that we took the hawks to was < Blackwood Canyon > in Benton City, Washington, back in 1993. After Rusty chased around their pheasants a bit, the vintner there gave us an extended private wine-tasting session that included most of what they made at the time, whites and reds, and even a vinegar and something they called "double nickel", a liqueur-like thing that besides having high alcohol content was a 55 on some sugar scale, topping the concentration you find in honey. (Whee, a mere $150 per 375 ml bottle now... at that price, we probably accounted for $5 each worth of just that at our tasting session.) We ended up buying several bottles of a late harvest Riesling there, which made an excellent dessert wine.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


My wife and I visited Blackwood Canyon back in 1994, and I have to say that it was the winery we liked least of the ones we visited that weekend.  Each of the wines we tasted seemed heavily oxidized or off in some way.

On the other hand, one of the wineries in Central/Eastern Washington that we really liked to visit: < Chinook Wines >


Two of our favorite Washington wineries overall:

< McCrea Cellars > - Specializes in Rhone varietals.

< Andrew Will Winery > - Good Merlot and Bordeaux blends
Posted by: stevestory on June 09 2007,22:21

Everybody makes 'chicken caesar salads' now, but the real caesar salad comes with anchovies. I'd never had them before, but I loves me some caesar salad. Curious, I bought the one can of anchovies i could find at Harris Teeter, and chopped a few up and make a real caesar salad.

Strange taste. ...different. kind of good, kind of bad. Strong as hell. Really stinky. But not necessarily bad stinky, more like Gorgonzola cheese stinky--it's very pungeant and you wouldn't want to wear that perfume to a first date, but the taste is not all that bad. Very strong and salty and I understand the popularity of the chicken substitution. The anchovies aren't a safe choice. But not bad. Give it a shot.
Posted by: stevestory on June 09 2007,22:27

Quote (Wesley R. Elsberry @ June 09 2007,00:14)
Ira kept pressing Diane to have some more, so by the time we got on the road, she was quite tipsy. That was interesting, because she usually has little interest in alcoholic beverages, so I don't see her in that state much, or almost never.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Chef: You're gonna have to get them in the mood.
Stan: How do we do that?
Chef: Do what I do. Get 'em goooood and drunk.
Posted by: Richardthughes on June 09 2007,22:58

Quote (stevestory @ June 09 2007,22:21)
Everybody makes 'chicken caesar salads' now, but the real caesar salad comes with anchovies. I'd never had them before, but I loves me some caesar salad. Curious, I bought the one can of anchovies i could find at Harris Teeter, and chopped a few up and make a real caesar salad.

Strange taste. ...different. kind of good, kind of bad. Strong as hell. Really stinky. But not necessarily bad stinky, more like Gorgonzola cheese stinky--it's very pungeant and you wouldn't want to wear that perfume to a first date, but the taste is not all that bad. Very strong and salty and I understand the popularity of the chicken substitution. The anchovies aren't a safe choice. But not bad. Give it a shot.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


They're in the dressing too, I think.
Posted by: Arden Chatfield on June 10 2007,01:13

Quote (Richardthughes @ June 09 2007,09:01)
Quote (Ftk @ June 09 2007,08:55)
[blushing]

Um...Richard, you mailbox is full.  I guess I sent one too many pictures...

[/blushing]
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


I emptied it for you. That "nurse" one was excellent.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


All you got was 'nurse'?

Shoot, dude, she sent me 'astronaut', 'pope' and 'ice cream lady'.

Pppphhht.
Posted by: Ichthyic on June 10 2007,03:07

Quote (Arden Chatfield @ June 10 2007,01:13)
Quote (Richardthughes @ June 09 2007,09:01)
 
Quote (Ftk @ June 09 2007,08:55)
[blushing]

Um...Richard, you mailbox is full.  I guess I sent one too many pictures...

[/blushing]
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


I emptied it for you. That "nurse" one was excellent.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


All you got was 'nurse'?

Shoot, dude, she sent me 'astronaut', 'pope' and 'ice cream lady'.

Pppphhht.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


I just finished off a pitcher of margaritas (my date was a complete lightweight - oh wait she was driving).

However, even full of margaritas, that image you just painted disturbed my fevered little brain.

I implore you not to post the actual photos, or I may end up having to clean 3/4 of a pitcher of half digested margaritas from my keyboard and monitor.

ever try cleaning a mess up like that?

triple sec is damn sticky.
Posted by: Stephen Elliott on June 10 2007,10:11

Repent, repent. Stop drinking alcoholic bevereges now!






You are putting the prices up and I am a miser.
Posted by: "Rev Dr" Lenny Flank on June 10 2007,10:24

Quote (Stephen Elliott @ June 10 2007,10:11)
Repent, repent. Stop drinking alcoholic bevereges now!






You are putting the prices up and I am a miser.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Dude, brew your own.


:)
Posted by: Stephen Elliott on June 10 2007,11:00

Quote ("Rev Dr" Lenny Flank @ June 10 2007,10:24)
Dude, brew your own.


:)
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


I used to. I found beer much harder to make than wine. Managed to get my wine to 18/19% ABV though.

Right now I don't have the space to brew. You stinkin CAPATLlist.

Bye the way: The high ABV was done through re-use of wine yeast. Took a while but worked.
Posted by: Arden Chatfield on June 10 2007,11:10

Quote ("Rev Dr" Lenny Flank @ June 10 2007,10:24)
Quote (Stephen Elliott @ June 10 2007,10:11)
Repent, repent. Stop drinking alcoholic bevereges now!



You are putting the prices up and I am a miser.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Dude, brew your own.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Lenny, you've told us how small your 'apartment' is, I can't believe that among your snakes and books that you have the room to brew beer.
Posted by: Louis on June 10 2007,11:51

Carlsonjok and Albatrossity2,



---------------------QUOTE-------------------
Back in the early 1990s, on the advice of a friend, I put away a few bottles of Margaux.  I finally opened a 1989 Prieure-Lichine last year and it was fabulous. I have a couple of 1988s that I am eyeing laviciously and a 2001 that I just stored away.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------





---------------------QUOTE-------------------
My tasting notes indicate that we had the 1949, 1953, 1955, 1959 and 1961. The '49 and '53 were stunning,
---------------------QUOTE-------------------



Of course you must now realise that I hate you both with envy inspired passion that borders on the holy!  :angry:

Oh not really! Yup as indicated the problem with Margaux is they are not cheap and Ch Margaux are even more not cheap. I celebrated the sale of my first house, my wife's PhD and my PhD with Margaux...and later on champagne, but the Margaux was the real treat.

The '49 Ch Margaux.....one can but dream! And the late 80's vintages are just coming in like you say Carlson, they are meant to be very very good. {looks in wallet} I may wait a while!

Louis
Posted by: blipey on June 10 2007,12:06

Quote (Richardthughes @ June 09 2007,22:58)
Quote (stevestory @ June 09 2007,22:21)
Everybody makes 'chicken caesar salads' now, but the real caesar salad comes with anchovies. I'd never had them before, but I loves me some caesar salad. Curious, I bought the one can of anchovies i could find at Harris Teeter, and chopped a few up and make a real caesar salad.

Strange taste. ...different. kind of good, kind of bad. Strong as hell. Really stinky. But not necessarily bad stinky, more like Gorgonzola cheese stinky--it's very pungeant and you wouldn't want to wear that perfume to a first date, but the taste is not all that bad. Very strong and salty and I understand the popularity of the chicken substitution. The anchovies aren't a safe choice. But not bad. Give it a shot.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


They're in the dressing too, I think.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


A traditional caesar salad does not contain anchovies.  Caesar salad is made with worcestershire sauce, which does have anchovies in it.  Over the years, many places have started to use an anchovie paste in the dressing, and occasionally you will see sliced anchovie on the salad.  These I hold in the same contempt as caesars with tomato or caesars that are not tossed until the dressing very lightly coats all the romaine without any pooling .
Posted by: stevestory on June 10 2007,12:12

Quote (blipey @ June 10 2007,13:06)
A traditional caesar salad does not contain anchovies.  Caesar salad is made with worcestershire sauce, which does have anchovies in it.  Over the years, many places have started to use an anchovie paste in the dressing, and occasionally you will see sliced anchovie on the salad.  These I hold in the same contempt as caesars with tomato or caesars that are not tossed until the dressing very lightly coats all the romaine without any pooling .
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


That blipey what a jerk I'm going to ban him first let me make sure that he's wrong...

(wikipedia)



---------------------QUOTE-------------------
Contrary to popular belief, the original Caesar salad recipe did not contain pieces of anchovy; the slight anchovy flavor comes from the Worcestershire sauce, which does contain anchovies. Cardini was opposed to using anchovies in his salad, but some modern recipes now include chopped anchovy fillets or anchovy paste.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------



grumble grumble dammit...
Posted by: blipey on June 10 2007,12:35

BAN ME WILL YOU!  LET'S SEE HOW WELL YOU BAN WITH MY ANCHOVIE DOWN YOUR THROAT.  HOMO.

I do love me some caesar salad.  It was actually a little side project of mine on my recent national tour.  I had an astounding number of caesar salads from coast to coast.  Some good, a very few stellar, and many sorry-ass ones.
Posted by: Louis on June 10 2007,12:38

Caesar salad is great. It combines the right quantities of fat and sugar to make it yummy. And you can add bacon and chicken and all kins of good stuff to it.....oh pants, now I want a caesar salad.

The male food groups: fried (fat), sweet (sugars, carbs etc), beer, burnt crispy bits, kebab, spicy.

Louis
Posted by: stevestory on June 10 2007,12:42

Quote (Louis @ June 10 2007,13:38)
Caesar salad is great. It combines the right quantities of fat and sugar to make it yummy. And you can add bacon and chicken and all kins of good stuff to it.....oh pants, now I want a caesar salad.

The male food groups: fried (fat), sweet (sugars, carbs etc), beer, burnt crispy bits, kebab, spicy.

Louis
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


I guess I'll hold off on my new signature "Blipey delenda est" a little while longer.

:angry:

I so like the food group 'burnt crispey bits'.

For the first time in ages I have a day off tomorrow so I picked up a case of Sarnac on the way home. A sampler of 6 different summer beers.
Posted by: Arden Chatfield on June 10 2007,12:43

Quote (stevestory @ June 10 2007,12:12)
Quote (blipey @ June 10 2007,13:06)
A traditional caesar salad does not contain anchovies.  Caesar salad is made with worcestershire sauce, which does have anchovies in it.  Over the years, many places have started to use an anchovie paste in the dressing, and occasionally you will see sliced anchovie on the salad.  These I hold in the same contempt as caesars with tomato or caesars that are not tossed until the dressing very lightly coats all the romaine without any pooling .
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


That blipey what a jerk I'm going to ban him first let me make sure that he's wrong...

(wikipedia)



---------------------QUOTE-------------------
Contrary to popular belief, the original Caesar salad recipe did not contain pieces of anchovy; the slight anchovy flavor comes from the Worcestershire sauce, which does contain anchovies. Cardini was opposed to using anchovies in his salad, but some modern recipes now include chopped anchovy fillets or anchovy paste.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------



grumble grumble dammit...
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Oh come on, Steve! If UD/DT has taught you anything, it's that being proven wrong is EXACTLY when you're supposed to ban someone!
Posted by: stevestory on June 10 2007,12:45

:p
Posted by: Arden Chatfield on June 10 2007,12:48

Quote (Louis @ June 10 2007,12:38)
Caesar salad is great. It combines the right quantities of fat and sugar to make it yummy. And you can add bacon and chicken and all kins of good stuff to it.....oh pants, now I want a caesar salad.

The male food groups: fried (fat), sweet (sugars, carbs etc), beer, burnt crispy bits, kebab, spicy.

Louis
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


This reminds me of the old joke: Irish coffee is the perfect food, since it's the only food in the world that combines sugar, grease, alcohol, and caffeine.
Posted by: stevestory on June 10 2007,12:50

Damn. Now I want some Irish coffee.

:(
Posted by: Louis on June 10 2007,12:51

BAN BAN BAN BAN

Wait who are we talking about?

Blipey? NOOOO! Don't ban him, I want to see if DaveTard shoots him....

Erm.....what I mean is, Blipey I wish no harm to befall your fabulous self, but you are obviously such a threatening person that even the mere offer of a visit inspires mortal terror and threats of murder.

Obviously if you come to my house for a visit I'll have to drive to the gun store (via the government somehow) magic up a gun licence and get a gun and drive very quickly back and shoot you. I may also need to buy some dogs. Sod it, way too much like hard work, how about if you come to the UK for a visit I'll buy you a beer? Steve gave good advice about getting people good and drunk upthread. It works equally well for terrifying American assassins like you as it does for dates one wishes to make easier. Apparently, I mean I don;t actually know....

Oh poo, this whole post is highly incriminating. Bugger.

Louis
Posted by: stevestory on June 10 2007,12:55

Pan frying up some tilapia fillets ($3/lb at Harris Teeter) in a little olive oil after rubbing them in Szeged fish rub.
Posted by: Louis on June 10 2007,12:55

I have checked my kitchen. I have worcestershire sauce, parmesan, eggs, hearts of romaine lettuce, limes, olive oil and all those ingredients for caesar salad plus chicken and bacon.

I also have cream and coffee and Irish whiskey* and sugar.

Hmmm what to do, what to do.....

Louis

* I also have Indian whiskey. Yes you read that correctly, Indian whiskey. One of my wife's uncles thinks I like it. The Indians are a wonderful group of people and India is a wonderful nation. Whiskey is not one of their specialities. It is singularly one of the most disgusting things I have ever tasted, but it does light a barbeque very nicely. Whiskey smoked barbeque!
Posted by: Arden Chatfield on June 10 2007,12:59



---------------------QUOTE-------------------

Blipey? NOOOO! Don't ban him, I want to see if DaveTard shoots him....

---------------------QUOTE-------------------



Me too. Blipey should tell us beforehand if he ever goes to Austin, so we can start up a betting pool. Warning shot, head shot, opens the door with the chain on but sticks the gun barrel through the door, verbal abuse but no gun, refuses to answer his doorbell, an amicable lunch at Looby's, the possibilities are endless.
Posted by: Louis on June 10 2007,13:03

I'm going with:

"Hides behind the couch pretending not to be in until he goes away"

Louis
Posted by: blipey on June 10 2007,13:26

Quote (Louis @ June 10 2007,13:03)
I'm going with:

"Hides behind the couch pretending not to be in until he goes away"

Louis
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Damnit, I wanted that one.  If you let me go in with you, you can have 25% of my winnings as well.
Posted by: blipey on June 10 2007,13:32

As for drinking a beer in the UK?  Why would any sane person turn that down?  If in the London(?) area, I will certainly give you a call.  I will also come alone, walking backward, with both hands visible at all times.

An aside:  what the hell dumbass was responsible for every US corporate restaurant making an Irish Coffee with one of the following recipes:

1.  Jameson's, Bailey's, coffee, canned whip cream
2.  Jameson's, Bailey's, creme de menthe, coffee, canned whip cream, marachinno cherry.
Posted by: Arden Chatfield on June 10 2007,13:33

Quote (Louis @ June 10 2007,12:55)
* I also have Indian whiskey. Yes you read that correctly, Indian whiskey. One of my wife's uncles thinks I like it. The Indians are a wonderful group of people and India is a wonderful nation. Whiskey is not one of their specialities. It is singularly one of the most disgusting things I have ever tasted, but it does light a barbeque very nicely. Whiskey smoked barbeque!
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Have your in-laws ever plied you with < this? >
Posted by: carlsonjok on June 10 2007,18:08

Quote (Louis @ June 10 2007,11:51)
Carlsonjok and Albatrossity2,



---------------------QUOTE-------------------
Back in the early 1990s, on the advice of a friend, I put away a few bottles of Margaux.  I finally opened a 1989 Prieure-Lichine last year and it was fabulous. I have a couple of 1988s that I am eyeing laviciously and a 2001 that I just stored away.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------





---------------------QUOTE-------------------
My tasting notes indicate that we had the 1949, 1953, 1955, 1959 and 1961. The '49 and '53 were stunning,
---------------------QUOTE-------------------



Of course you must now realise that I hate you both with envy inspired passion that borders on the holy!  :angry:
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Well, if it is any consolation, I lucked into them.  I had no idea what I was buying. I just did it, as I said, on advice.  FWIW, I also bought a 1987, which is considered a pretty poor vintage.  I only wish I had been into wine when the 2000 were released.  Those are supposed to be classics.

Also FWIW, I was green with envy at the vertical tasting Albatrossity did.  I am probably not enough of an oneophile to truly appreciate such an opportunity, but I sure wouldn't turn it down either.  I really need some rich friends like that.  Unfortunately, most of our friends are broke-ass horse people who like wine from a box and think Michelob is a high-end beer.
Posted by: Albatrossity2 on June 10 2007,18:29

Quote (carlsonjok @ June 10 2007,18:08)
Also FWIW, I was green with envy at the vertical tasting Albatrossity did.  I am probably not enough of an oneophile to truly appreciate such an opportunity, but I sure wouldn't turn it down either.  I really need some rich friends like that.  Unfortunately, most of our friends are broke-ass horse people who like wine from a box and think Michelob is a high-end beer.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Well, all I have from that tasting is memories, a slightly hardened liver, and the realization that it costs a lot more to drink great wines than I have in my savings account...

Right now, however, I am drinking a quite quaffable Chardonnay (Cambria 2004, Katherine's Vineyard, Santa Maria Valley) and preparing to grill some chicken. Things could definitely be worse than that!
Posted by: Ichthyic on June 10 2007,18:34

Quote (Stephen Elliott @ June 10 2007,10:11)
Repent, repent. Stop drinking alcoholic bevereges now!






You are putting the prices up and I am a miser.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


no shit!

that pitcher cost me 22.00!
Posted by: Ichthyic on June 10 2007,18:41



---------------------QUOTE-------------------
Well, all I have from that tasting is memories, a slightly hardened liver, and the realization that it costs a lot more to drink great wines than I have in my savings account...
---------------------QUOTE-------------------



we all drinks da 2 buck chuck round these here parts.

< http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charles_Shaw_wine >

ahh, good ol trader joes.
Posted by: carlsonjok on June 10 2007,19:33

Quote (Albatrossity2 @ June 10 2007,18:29)
Well, all I have from that tasting is memories, a slightly hardened liver, and the realization that it costs a lot more to drink great wines than I have in my savings account...
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Tell me about it.  I rarely pay more than $30 for a bottle and only rarely, at that.


---------------------QUOTE-------------------

Right now, however, I am drinking a quite quaffable Chardonnay (Cambria 2004, Katherine's Vineyard, Santa Maria Valley) and preparing to grill some chicken. Things could definitely be worse than that!
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Never been a big Chardonnay fan.  I don't like what oak aging does to a white. If that makes me a pirahna in wine circles, so be it. I tend more to Rieslings, Gewurtztraminers, and Liebfraumilchs.  FWIW, Wine Spectator raved about the 2005 German Rieslings.  They are reasonably priced, too.
Posted by: Albatrossity2 on June 10 2007,20:05

Quote (carlsonjok @ June 10 2007,19:33)
Never been a big Chardonnay fan.  I don't like what oak aging does to a white. If that makes me a pirahna in wine circles, so be it. I tend more to Rieslings, Gewurtztraminers, and Liebfraumilchs.  FWIW, Wine Spectator raved about the 2005 German Rieslings.  They are reasonably priced, too.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


I certainly agree, and I avoid over-oaked chardonnays for that reason. This one (Cambria) is not overly oaked. And there are several others that you might try. The Saintsbury (only the Carneros Creek vineyard bottling) is a good example; not a lot of oak, but a hell of a lot of fruit in that one. And there are others; unfortunately the Chardonnay, a good dinner, and a weekend lethargy make it difficult for me to recall them at this very moment  :)

Stay away from the Toasted Head vintages, for sure! Those barrels with toasted heads are gonna give you a fair amount of oak, and if you dislike oakiness, you will find them appalling...
Posted by: Louis on June 11 2007,06:32

Quote (blipey @ June 10 2007,20:26)
Quote (Louis @ June 10 2007,13:03)
I'm going with:

"Hides behind the couch pretending not to be in until he goes away"

Louis
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Damnit, I wanted that one.  If you let me go in with you, you can have 25% of my winnings as well.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


25%??? Are you trying to rip me off? I want 10% and not a penny more!

Louis

P.S. D'Oh!
Posted by: Louis on June 11 2007,06:33

Quote (Arden Chatfield @ June 10 2007,20:33)
Quote (Louis @ June 10 2007,12:55)
* I also have Indian whiskey. Yes you read that correctly, Indian whiskey. One of my wife's uncles thinks I like it. The Indians are a wonderful group of people and India is a wonderful nation. Whiskey is not one of their specialities. It is singularly one of the most disgusting things I have ever tasted, but it does light a barbeque very nicely. Whiskey smoked barbeque!
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Have your in-laws ever plied you with < this? >
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Not that (They're northern Indians), but sugar cane derived alcohol certainly. And a little drink from Rajastan with opium in it.....

different story for a different day.

Louis
Posted by: Albatrossity2 on June 11 2007,07:15

There being no other relevant place to post this note, I'll drop it off here. Tomorrow (Tu June 12) Elizabeth and I are heading to Spartansburg SC for a few days. She is attending and presenting a paper at the < ASLE (Assocation for the Study of Literature and the Environment) > conference, and I am tagging along to take some hikes, see some birds, and soak in some talks on literature and the environment. My brother and sister-in-law, who live in Carrboro NC, are coming down for a day, so we will be able to get together with them. But if any AtBCers are in the area, or are planning to attend this meeting, drop me a note and perhaps we can get together for a beer. Sorry, I won't be able to pay for a bottle of D'Yquem...
Posted by: stevestory on June 11 2007,07:20

When you come up to visit them here in Carrboro, let me know.
Posted by: Albatrossity2 on June 11 2007,09:23

Quote (stevestory @ June 11 2007,07:20)
When you come up to visit them here in Carrboro, let me know.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Will do; we get back there every couple of years or so. I'm sure you can suggest some good places for libations there!
Posted by: stevestory on June 11 2007,09:28

Quote (Albatrossity2 @ June 11 2007,10:23)
Quote (stevestory @ June 11 2007,07:20)
When you come up to visit them here in Carrboro, let me know.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Will do; we get back there every couple of years or so. I'm sure you can suggest some good places for libations there!
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


We'll go to < Hell. >

(Don't look shocked, creationists)
Posted by: Albatrossity2 on June 11 2007,09:48

Quote (stevestory @ June 11 2007,09:28)
 
Quote (Albatrossity2 @ June 11 2007,10:23)
 
Quote (stevestory @ June 11 2007,07:20)
When you come up to visit them here in Carrboro, let me know.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Will do; we get back there every couple of years or so. I'm sure you can suggest some good places for libations there!
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


We'll go to < Hell. >

(Don't look shocked, creationists)
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


I dunno about that He11 place. Not only is it blasphemous, it seems possible that it is run by atheistic communists. Note this cocktail description from their website  

---------------------QUOTE-------------------
BAY OF PIGS: Stoli & Bacardi. Viva la revolucion!
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Pinkos! Egad!
Posted by: stevestory on June 13 2007,15:27

my jerk chicken requires chopping into fine bits several ingredients you don't want to contact much. Onions, garlic, and most of all, extremely hot peppers. I don't have a food processor. I'd like one, but I'd rather not either spend $200 for a good one or $20 for a crappy one which'll break in 3 mos. What I do have is a blender. Never used it as a food processor. But, looking at it, I see it has rapidly whirring blades. Think it'll work?
Posted by: Ichthyic on June 13 2007,15:31

depends on the blender, and how fine you want your ingredient "pieces" to be.

hey, if you're having problems with getting caustic plant chemicals on your hands, you can always by a box of disposable latex gloves.

cheap and effective.
Posted by: stevestory on June 13 2007,15:42

I might put an ad on Craigslist for a good used food processor.
Posted by: stevestory on June 13 2007,15:44

gloves are fine. Did I mention I'm extremely lazy? I just want to put everything in a device and mash a button.
Posted by: stevestory on June 13 2007,15:51

Optimally I would just get it at some restaurant. Problem is, most jerk chicken you get is just a dry rub. The type I'm hooked on is a very wet saucy type over rice, kind of like the consistency of curry chicken from an indian place. It's the kind I used to get at Alfie's in Raleigh, which has unfortunately closed down. I can't find it that style anywhere around here, so I'm stuck making it myself.
Posted by: Ichthyic on June 13 2007,15:52

Quote (stevestory @ June 13 2007,15:44)
gloves are fine. Did I mention I'm extremely lazy? I just want to put everything in a device and mash a button.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


yup, food processor for you then.

get ye hence to ebay.

do remember you have to keep them clean, though.

there is at least that much effort involved.

oh, and you sometimes will need to change blades for best effect.
Posted by: Ichthyic on June 13 2007,15:56

Quote (stevestory @ June 13 2007,15:51)
Optimally I would just get it at some restaurant. Problem is, most jerk chicken you get is just a dry rub. The type I'm hooked on is a very wet saucy type over rice, kind of like the consistency of curry chicken from an indian place. It's the kind I used to get at Alfie's in Raleigh, which has unfortunately closed down. I can't find it that style anywhere around here, so I'm stuck making it myself.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


reminds me quite a lot of my year long efforts to create a decent Thai curry paste from scratch.

finally gave up in favor of buying curry paste from a Thai deli, and then just adding ingredients from that base.

did you know there are over 17 different kinds of curry paste available at a decent Thai deli?
Posted by: stevestory on June 13 2007,16:09

well, I just tested it, and I don't need a food processor. The onion, garlic, and habanero were obliterated in a matter of seconds. Perfect.
Posted by: Ichthyic on June 13 2007,16:13

I'm gettin hungry!
Posted by: stevestory on June 13 2007,16:18

the ingredients were so obliterated, I think I'll go ahead and put the chicken in the blender with the other ingredients. Why spend time chopping it into 50 pieces when I could blend it into 5,000?
Posted by: Arden Chatfield on June 13 2007,16:19



---------------------QUOTE-------------------

did you know there are over 17 different kinds of curry paste available at a decent Thai deli?

---------------------QUOTE-------------------



My favorite Indian spice store in Berkeley has dozens of different kinds of curry pastes. < Patak's > are really good to start, but they have dozens of other weird imported brands as well. They also have a growing selection of Sri Lankan spices, which are surprisingly different from Indian ones. Just yesterday I bought a bottle of Larich's 'Red Hot Curry Paste' from Sri Lanka, just because it looked intriguing. I'm thinking of taking that one out for a spin with some chicken thighs this weekend.

I hope it's better than this jar of Sri Lankan biryani paste I bought a couple years ago -- salty to the point of inedibility. Ouch.

I also bought some of the spices necesssary for a home-made < phaal >, having been inspired by Louis.
Posted by: Arden Chatfield on June 13 2007,16:20

Quote (stevestory @ June 13 2007,16:18)
the ingredients were so obliterated, I think I'll go ahead and put the chicken in the blender with the other ingredients. Why spend time chopping it into 50 pieces when I could blend it into 5,000?
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Then you can just drink the whole thing like a milk shake.  :p
Posted by: stevestory on June 13 2007,16:22

that's the consistency it'll be. But then I have to cook it for 30 mins or so.
Posted by: Ichthyic on June 13 2007,16:32

Quote (Arden Chatfield @ June 13 2007,16:19)


---------------------QUOTE-------------------

did you know there are over 17 different kinds of curry paste available at a decent Thai deli?

---------------------QUOTE-------------------



My favorite Indian spice store in Berkeley has dozens of different kinds of curry pastes. < Patak's > are really good to start, but they have dozens of other weird imported brands as well. They also have a growing selection of Sri Lankan spices, which are surprisingly different from Indian ones. Just yesterday I bought a bottle of Larich's 'Red Hot Curry Paste' from Sri Lanka, just because it looked intriguing. I'm thinking of taking that one out for a spin with some chicken thighs this weekend.

I hope it's better than this jar of Sri Lankan biryani paste I bought a couple years ago -- salty to the point of inedibility. Ouch.

I also bought some of the spices necesssary for a home-made < phaal >, having been inspired by Louis.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


heh.

funny you should mention Berkeley, as the Thai deli on University Ave. is where I used to buy my Thai curry paste.
Posted by: Arden Chatfield on June 13 2007,16:51



---------------------QUOTE-------------------

funny you should mention Berkeley, as the Thai deli on University Ave. is where I used to buy my Thai curry paste.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------



This place is on University, too, next to San Pablo.

Whatever else you think about Berkeley, it's a foodie's paradise.
Posted by: Ichthyic on June 13 2007,16:53

no argument there.

best delis AND bookstores of any place I have ever lived.

speaking of which...

Is Moe's books still around?
Posted by: blipey on June 13 2007,16:58

You kidding?  I was in the Bay Area for 2 weeks and I never looked you up!  Jeebus, I'm a moron.
Posted by: Ichthyic on June 13 2007,17:05

I know we had a "where are you" thread a while back.

might be a good thing to resurrect and sticky that sucker, so those on travels might get an idea of who might be hanging at their destinations.
Posted by: Arden Chatfield on June 13 2007,17:06

Quote (Ichthyic @ June 13 2007,16:53)
no argument there.

best delis AND bookstores of any place I have ever lived.

speaking of which...

Is Moe's books still around?
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Yes, but Cody's folded. :(

The Telegraph district is looking a bit raggedy-ass these days. More than usual.
Posted by: Arden Chatfield on June 13 2007,17:07

Quote (blipey @ June 13 2007,16:58)
You kidding?  I was in the Bay Area for 2 weeks and I never looked you up!  Jeebus, I'm a moron.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Hey, and I wouldn't have even pointed a gun at you!
Posted by: Ichthyic on June 13 2007,17:07



---------------------QUOTE-------------------
The Telegraph district is looking a bit raggedy-ass these days. More than usual.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------



inevitable.

it was being torn apart by the introduction of chain stores starting in the mid 80's, and it was just getting worse by the time I left in the early 90's.

*sigh*
Posted by: Ichthyic on June 13 2007,17:11

I've been thinking about a last trip to berkeley to see how the new life-sciences building and library worked out; see what remains of the people I studied with while I was there.

I think Doug Long still hangs around the paleo dept., and I'm reasonably sure Roy Caldwell is still there in the "integrative biology" dept.

need more reliable transportation than i have at the moment though.
Posted by: Louis on June 14 2007,04:36



---------------------QUOTE-------------------
I also bought some of the spices necesssary for a home-made phaal, having been inspired by Louis.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------



NOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO!!!!! MAN WAS NOT MEANT TO MEDDLE IN THESE MATTERS!!!!!

You know the saying:

Don't let the bottom fall out of your world. Have a phall and let the world fall out of your bottom.

Louis

P.S. If you absolutely, positively have to do this to your insides I have two recommendations: 1) buy/make some < lassi > and get hold of at least 2 litres of cheap lager, preferably Indian lager. These are the only things to quench the fires  successfully. 2) Put a roll of toilet paper in the fridge at least 3 hours before eating. I am not joking. Preferably use one of those aloe vera infused luxury ones that will leave cooling balm on your brown eye. I really am serious about this. A properly made phall is part of India's revenge on Britain and as such is classified under the Geneva convention as a chemical weapon. If, when said curry has passed through to the latter stages of your digestive tract, you are not found crying like a 5 year old girl with a skinned knee and holding onto the toilet with molten lava shooting out of your arse, then you will have earned my eternal digestive respect! Good luck soldier. Stiff upper (?) lip!
Posted by: Arden Chatfield on June 14 2007,09:25

Quote (Louis @ June 14 2007,04:36)
 

---------------------QUOTE-------------------
I also bought some of the spices necesssary for a home-made phaal, having been inspired by Louis.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------



NOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO!!!!! MAN WAS NOT MEANT TO MEDDLE IN THESE MATTERS!!!!!

You know the saying:

Don't let the bottom fall out of your world. Have a phall and let the world fall out of your bottom.

Louis

P.S. If you absolutely, positively have to do this to your insides I have two recommendations: 1) buy/make some < lassi > and get hold of at least 2 litres of cheap lager, preferably Indian lager. These are the only things to quench the fires  successfully. 2) Put a roll of toilet paper in the fridge at least 3 hours before eating. I am not joking. Preferably use one of those aloe vera infused luxury ones that will leave cooling balm on your brown eye.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


"I walked in to a burnin' ring of fire..."

(Wow, two Johnny Cash references on ATBC in one day! What are the odds?)

 

---------------------QUOTE-------------------
I really am serious about this. A properly made phall is part of India's revenge on Britain and as such is classified under the Geneva convention as a chemical weapon. If, when said curry has passed through to the latter stages of your digestive tract, you are not found crying like a 5 year old girl with a skinned knee and holding onto the toilet with molten lava shooting out of your arse, then you will have earned my eternal digestive respect! Good luck soldier. Stiff upper (?) lip!
---------------------QUOTE-------------------



Now, you see, Louis, talk like this just makes me want to do it all the more!

(You can expect to hear from my lawyers in the morning.)
Posted by: stevestory on June 14 2007,18:36

tonight's libations: Twisted Tea and Corona.
Posted by: Arden Chatfield on June 14 2007,18:50

Quote (stevestory @ June 13 2007,15:51)
Optimally I would just get it at some restaurant. Problem is, most jerk chicken you get is just a dry rub. The type I'm hooked on is a very wet saucy type over rice, kind of like the consistency of curry chicken from an indian place. It's the kind I used to get at Alfie's in Raleigh, which has unfortunately closed down. I can't find it that style anywhere around here, so I'm stuck making it myself.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


So how did your jerk chicken come out?
Posted by: stevestory on June 14 2007,18:59

I wound up putting the chicken in the blender too. so the recipe was something like

1 cup chicken broth
1 cup tomato paste
1/4 tsp of cloves, cinammon, nutmeg, and ginger
1 tsp allspice
1 scotch bonnet pepper
1 habanero pepper
1 tsp ground pepper
1 clove garlic
1 tbsp oil
1 red onion damn near liquified in the blender
1 chicken breast, ditto

simmer for about an hour on the stove, serve over rice.

it was soooo good. Not quite hot enough. liquifying the chicken made the whole dish a real smooth sauce. It was actually really tasty. Simmering the sauce for an hour, with a whole, liquified onion in there and a clove of garlic, and no top on so it would reduce to a nice thick sauce, kind of pissed my roommate off, and she aired out the apartment today.
Posted by: Arden Chatfield on June 14 2007,19:07

Quote (stevestory @ June 14 2007,18:59)
I wound up putting the chicken in the blender too. so the recipe was something like

1 cup chicken broth
1 cup tomato paste
1/4 tsp of cloves, cinammon, nutmeg, and ginger
1 tsp allspice
1 scotch bonnet pepper
1 habanero pepper
1 tsp ground pepper
1 clove garlic
1 tbsp oil
1 red onion damn near liquified in the blender
1 chicken breast, ditto

simmer for about an hour on the stove, serve over rice.

it was soooo good. Not quite hot enough. liquifying the chicken made the whole dish a real smooth sauce. It was actually really tasty. Simmering the sauce for an hour, with a whole, liquified onion in there and a clove of garlic, and no top on so it would reduce to a nice thick sauce, kind of pissed my roommate off, and she aired out the apartment today.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Sounds yummy, I may well try that recipe!

(Tho I'd probably triple the garlic, use a yellow onion instead, and I dunno about liquifying the chicken like you did.)

You actually ascertained that there's a difference between scotch bonnets and habaneros?

(And one habanero and one scotch bonnet and it wasn't hot enough??? How'd that happen?)
Posted by: stevestory on June 14 2007,19:23

Quote (Arden Chatfield @ June 14 2007,20:07)
(And one habanero and one scotch bonnet and it wasn't hot enough??? How'd that happen?)
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


You know this stuff?



I can drink that straight up. The two peppers distributed over a total of about 3 cups of sauce wasn't hot enough. It's hot enough when my scalp starts sweating.


---------------------QUOTE-------------------

(Tho I'd probably triple the garlic, use a yellow onion instead, and I dunno about liquifying the chicken like you did.)

You actually ascertained that there's a difference between scotch bonnets and habaneros?
---------------------QUOTE-------------------



Yeah, more garlic is always good. And don't liquify the chicken. The smoothness was nice, but you want some texture. don't liquify the onion either, same reason.

There's a little bit of a difference between the habanero and the scotch bonnet. Not much. Really the only two essential ingredients to jerk is allspice and any retarded-hot pepper.


Posted by: snoeman on June 14 2007,19:46

Quote (stevestory @ June 14 2007,19:23)
Quote (Arden Chatfield @ June 14 2007,20:07)
(And one habanero and one scotch bonnet and it wasn't hot enough??? How'd that happen?)
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


You know this stuff?



I can drink that straight up. The two peppers distributed over a total of about 3 cups of sauce wasn't hot enough. It's hot enough when my scalp starts sweating.
 

---------------------QUOTE-------------------

(Tho I'd probably triple the garlic, use a yellow onion instead, and I dunno about liquifying the chicken like you did.)

You actually ascertained that there's a difference between scotch bonnets and habaneros?
---------------------QUOTE-------------------



Yeah, more garlic is always good. And don't liquify the chicken. The smoothness was nice, but you want some texture. don't liquify the onion either, same reason.

There's a little bit of a difference between the habanero and the scotch bonnet. Not much. Really the only two essential ingredients to jerk is allspice and any retarded-hot pepper.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


The liquefaction of your onions is why you might reconsider investing in a food processor.  They tend to be better for keeping stuff chunky.  Blenders are much better for creating smoother sauces, soups, etc.
Posted by: stevestory on June 14 2007,19:47

that is for sure
Posted by: stevestory on June 14 2007,19:51



---------------------QUOTE-------------------
Edited by stevestory on June 14 2007,20:25
---------------------QUOTE-------------------



:angry:

I don't like this "Edited..." business. I should be allowed to make sneaky changes later on to thwart my enemies. It's almost as if the site admins here decided that with power should come...should come...some kind of like obligation to do the right thing, if there's a word for that.


Posted by: Arden Chatfield on June 14 2007,21:21

Quote (stevestory @ June 14 2007,19:23)
 
Quote (Arden Chatfield @ June 14 2007,20:07)
(And one habanero and one scotch bonnet and it wasn't hot enough??? How'd that happen?)
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


You know this stuff?



I can drink that straight up. The two peppers distributed over a total of about 3 cups of sauce wasn't hot enough. It's hot enough when my scalp starts sweating.
   

---------------------QUOTE-------------------

(Tho I'd probably triple the garlic, use a yellow onion instead, and I dunno about liquifying the chicken like you did.)

You actually ascertained that there's a difference between scotch bonnets and habaneros?
---------------------QUOTE-------------------



Yeah, more garlic is always good. And don't liquify the chicken. The smoothness was nice, but you want some texture. don't liquify the onion either, same reason.

There's a little bit of a difference between the habanero and the scotch bonnet. Not much. Really the only two essential ingredients to jerk is allspice and any retarded-hot pepper.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Is that supposed to be regular Tabasco sauce or their habanero sauce? Regular Tabasco is warm but not all that hot.

Well, clearly, you're going to have to keep upping the dosage with the habaneros. Try four next time.  :p

My philosophy with garlic is that it's almost impossible to put in too much garlic.
Posted by: blipey on June 14 2007,23:08



---------------------QUOTE-------------------

You actually ascertained that there's a difference between scotch bonnets and habaneros?
---------------------QUOTE-------------------



There is, technically, a difference.  There are insane people out there who think that habaneros aren't hot enough.  Actually, depending on flavor of dish I might be one of those people.

Anywho, scotch bonnets are the result of habaneros that have  been specially engineered to be hotter.  I believe they are about the 3rd hottest pepper around now.  The habanero species is not as hot a the bird pepper species: pequin, etc.

There are several varieties of habanero and bird peppers.
Posted by: Ichthyic on June 14 2007,23:43



---------------------QUOTE-------------------
There are insane people out there who think that habaneros aren't hot enough
---------------------QUOTE-------------------



Guatemalan Insanity Peppers, baby!
Posted by: Arden Chatfield on June 14 2007,23:44

Quote (blipey @ June 14 2007,23:08)
 

---------------------QUOTE-------------------

You actually ascertained that there's a difference between scotch bonnets and habaneros?
---------------------QUOTE-------------------



There is, technically, a difference.  There are insane people out there who think that habaneros aren't hot enough.  Actually, depending on flavor of dish I might be one of those people.

Anywho, scotch bonnets are the result of habaneros that have  been specially engineered to be hotter.  I believe they are about the 3rd hottest pepper around now.  The habanero species is not as hot a the bird pepper species: pequin, etc.

There are several varieties of habanero and bird peppers.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


< This > little rascal is sposta be the hottest pepper in the world.


Posted by: stevestory on June 15 2007,04:15

Wiggum: Afternoon, Homer.  Care for some chili?  I've added an extra ingredient just for you. The merciless peppers of Quetzlzacatenango! Grown deep in the jungle primeval by the inmates of a Guatemalan insane asylum.
Homer: Uh, Wiggy?  My chili's getting cold.
Posted by: blipey on June 15 2007,04:52

Quote (Arden Chatfield @ June 14 2007,23:44)
Quote (blipey @ June 14 2007,23:08)
   

---------------------QUOTE-------------------

You actually ascertained that there's a difference between scotch bonnets and habaneros?
---------------------QUOTE-------------------



There is, technically, a difference.  There are insane people out there who think that habaneros aren't hot enough.  Actually, depending on flavor of dish I might be one of those people.

Anywho, scotch bonnets are the result of habaneros that have  been specially engineered to be hotter.  I believe they are about the 3rd hottest pepper around now.  The habanero species is not as hot a the bird pepper species: pequin, etc.

There are several varieties of habanero and bird peppers.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


< This > little rascal is sposta be the hottest pepper in the world.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Jumping Jeebus on a pogo stick, that's hot.  That's twice as hot as anything I've ever put in my mouth...ack, I mean, uh...ooooh
Posted by: Louis on June 15 2007,06:54

Ok chilli lovers, prepare to go green with envy and also glow with pride. I have learned something from you today about chillis, that this Naga chilli is the hottest in the world and that it has an almost as hot offspring.

That offspring, the Dorset Naga, is grown in Dorset, UK. My home county and where I played merrily as a boy, romping through fields, streams and such like. By happy coincidence I am off there this very evening to see Mama and Papa. The place where these Dorset Nagas are grown is a mere few miles from my house. I shall purchase some of these beauties and make my report next week.

Added in edit: Bugger, having read further I shall have to wait until July. Not only that, but they only ship in the UK. Into each life a little rain must fall

In the meantime, you poor saps with no Dorset heritage can order them online.

< http://www.peppersbypost.biz/ >

Louis
Posted by: Stephen Elliott on June 15 2007,13:35

Quote (Louis @ June 14 2007,04:36)
 

---------------------QUOTE-------------------
I also bought some of the spices necesssary for a home-made phaal, having been inspired by Louis.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


... Have a phall and let the world fall out of your bottom.

Louis...
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Ya know, I cannot for the life of me work out why someone would eat a phall (or something similar). Actually I can understand why someone would do it once but a repeat performance is a mystery to me. They are bleedin horrible! You could be eating damn near anything. The only clue to the contents is in the consistency as I can't taste a bleedin thing cept HEAT!

Red flush to the skin, eyes watering, profuse sweating, inability to sit still, heart palpitations etc. And the worst part is yet to come as that happens when the meal exits your body.
Posted by: Arden Chatfield on June 15 2007,14:32



---------------------QUOTE-------------------
Red flush to the skin, eyes watering, profuse sweating, inability to sit still, heart palpitations etc. And the worst part is yet to come as that happens when the meal exits your body.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------



So it's just like falling in love, then!
Posted by: Stephen Elliott on June 15 2007,14:38

Quote (Arden Chatfield @ June 15 2007,14:32)


---------------------QUOTE-------------------
Red flush to the skin, eyes watering, profuse sweating, inability to sit still, heart palpitations etc. And the worst part is yet to come as that happens when the meal exits your body.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------



So it's just like falling in love, then!
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Falling in love is probably worse. The symptoms last way longer.
Posted by: stevestory on June 16 2007,19:51

Lunch today: chorizo burrito from < Carrburritos >. Salsa fresca because I just wasn't feeling in the mood for heat. Dinner drinks: Smirnoff Hard Green Tea for the first time. Not bad.


Posted by: Arden Chatfield on June 16 2007,20:19

Well, I finally put that Sri Lankan 'Larich's Red Hot Curry Paste' to use with a bunch of chicken thighs. The intructions said use one tablespoon, but that sounded like way too little, so I used about 4 tablespoons. The instructions also said "add a tablepoon of chili powder if you wish", but I felt sure that mere chili powder would get totally drowned in the face of curry paste, so instead I added a tablepoon of cayenne pepper, in case the paste wasn't hot. Sri Lankan curry paste is real different from Indian curry paste, and smells like no Indian restaurant I've ever been to. The salient difference is supposed to be that they roast their curry powder before using it, which actually makes a big difference. Also, you can really taste the black pepper in Sri Lankan curries, which isn't very Indian (in my limited experience).

Oh yes, and I also had a yellow onion which I put through a blender. Turned it to liquid in 30 seconds, which was great, since I wanted the onion taste but didn't need onion texture. And I fucking hate chopping onions by hand. I think I'll do it that way from now on.

The result: it was really good, and seriously hot, to the level of scalp-sweating, but not to an unmanageable level. I downed two large glasses of milk, but the heat wasn't a deal breaker and I enjoyed it. (And my wife seemed to like it fine, too.) And, I felt quite vindicated in my impulse to quadruple the amount of paste and to replace the wimpy old chili powder with straightup cayenne. If I'd followed the recipe to the letter, it would have only been a little warm. Hmph.

I was considering trying to make a toned-down phaal tonight, but I don't have any habaneros, onions or coriander, so I'm thinking of going with < this >, instead, as a good lazy man's option.

I know using curry pastes wouldn't impress a purist or a real Indian cook, but if your cooking skill levels are as mediocre as mine, they're a total boon. Totally scratches your itch for something good 'n hot.
Posted by: stevestory on June 16 2007,20:30

I like making some things by hand. Prepackaged things can be good too. I have known obsessive foodies who were nuts about purity. I like a certain balance. A good cost/benefit ratio. It is worth making my own tacos instead of going to taco bell. It is not worth making my own flour tortillas vs buying them at a grocery store.

I was telling a friend about my jerk chicken experiments. "Do you use Wood(something) jerk seasoning?" she asked. "No." "How about Plutos?" "No, I blended the spices from scratch." "Oh. My mom was from Jamaica. Real Jamaicans never make it from scratch."
Posted by: stevestory on June 16 2007,20:38

Quote (Arden Chatfield @ June 16 2007,21:19)
Well, I finally put that Sri Lankan 'Larich's Red Hot Curry Paste' to use with a bunch of chicken thighs. The intructions said use one tablespoon, but that sounded like way too little, so I used about 4 tablespoons. The instructions also said "add a tablepoon of chili powder if you wish", but I felt sure that mere chili powder would get totally drowned in the face of curry paste, so instead I added a tablepoon of cayenne pepper, in case the paste wasn't hot. Sri Lankan curry paste is real different from Indian curry paste, and smells like no Indian restaurant I've ever been to. The salient difference is supposed to be that they roast their curry powder before using it, which actually makes a big difference. Also, you can really taste the black pepper in Sri Lankan curries, which isn't very Indian (in my limited experience).

Oh yes, and I also had a yellow onion which I put through a blender. Turned it to liquid in 30 seconds, which was great, since I wanted the onion taste but didn't need onion texture. And I fucking hate chopping onions by hand. I think I'll do it that way from now on.

The result: it was really good, and seriously hot, to the level of scalp-sweating, but not to an unmanageable level. I downed two large glasses of milk, but the heat wasn't a deal breaker and I enjoyed it. (And my wife seemed to like it fine, too.) And, I felt quite vindicated in my impulse to quadruple the amount of paste and to replace the wimpy old chili powder with straightup cayenne. If I'd followed the recipe to the letter, it would have only been a little warm. Hmph.

I was considering trying to make a toned-down phaal tonight, but I don't have any habaneros, onions or coriander, so I'm thinking of going with < this >, instead, as a good lazy man's option.

I know using curry pastes wouldn't impress a purist or a real Indian cook, but if your cooking skill levels are as mediocre as mine, they're a total boon. Totally scratches your itch for something good 'n hot.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


I hate chopping onions too. the blender is really good for the onion if you have a liquid to blend it in. Next time I make it I'm going to blend the onion again but not the chicken. The chicken bits will give it the desired texture.  



---------------------QUOTE-------------------
The result: it was really good, and seriously hot, to the level of scalp-sweating, but not to an unmanageable level.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------



Perfect.

The only problem with my jerk chickn is, I used a whole red onion. After simmering for about 2 hrs, the onion infused the whole dish with too much sweetness. I think next time I'll modify that somehow.


Posted by: Arden Chatfield on June 16 2007,21:13



---------------------QUOTE-------------------
I hate chopping onions too. the blender is really good for the onion if you have a liquid to blend it in. Next time I make it I'm going to blend the onion again but not the chicken. The chicken bits will give it the desired texture.  
---------------------QUOTE-------------------



When I get the habaneros, I think I'll just toss them in the blender too, along with the onions and garlic. We all know how risky handling habaneros is, even with gloves (don't scratch your eyes, careful next time you blow your nose or pee, etc., etc.). That whole Level-2 Biohazard problem is solved if you can just yank the stems and drop the little bastids into the hopper.

 

---------------------QUOTE-------------------

The only problem with my jerk chicken is, I used a whole red onion. After simmering for about 2 hrs, the onion infused the whole dish with too much sweetness. I think next time I'll modify that somehow.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------



I personally would use a yellow onion. I like red onions raw, but I don't cook with them. Try that and see if it makes a difference.

Speaking of chopped, raw red onions, try squeezing lime juice onto them, like they do in my local favorite Pakistani restaurant. Friggin rawks.
Posted by: stevestory on June 16 2007,21:19

I haven't had enough onions to know what the taste differences are between white, yellow, and red. I think I just started using reds because they look a lot sexier. You'd use yellow?
Posted by: Arden Chatfield on June 16 2007,21:21

Quote (stevestory @ June 16 2007,21:19)
I haven't had enough onions to know what the taste differences are between white, yellow, and red. I think I just started using reds because they look a lot sexier. You'd use yellow?
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


I prefer those big fat Texas yellow onions. Vastly less sweet than red onions, just pure onion taste.
Posted by: stevestory on June 16 2007,21:23

Thanks, I'm definitely changing onions.
Posted by: Richardthughes on June 16 2007,22:29

Quote (Arden Chatfield @ June 15 2007,14:32)


---------------------QUOTE-------------------
Red flush to the skin, eyes watering, profuse sweating, inability to sit still, heart palpitations etc. And the worst part is yet to come as that happens when the meal exits your body.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------



So it's just like falling in love, then!
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


HAR HAR. JUST WEIGHT TILL YOU PUT IT UP YOU'RE BUM, TARDEN CHATTERBOX. I NO ABOUT YOUR SORT OFF LOVE.

PS HOMO.
Posted by: Arden Chatfield on June 16 2007,23:06

Quote (Richardthughes @ June 16 2007,22:29)
Quote (Arden Chatfield @ June 15 2007,14:32)
 

---------------------QUOTE-------------------
Red flush to the skin, eyes watering, profuse sweating, inability to sit still, heart palpitations etc. And the worst part is yet to come as that happens when the meal exits your body.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------



So it's just like falling in love, then!
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


HAR HAR. JUST WEIGHT TILL YOU PUT IT UP YOU'RE BUM, TARDEN CHATTERBOX. I NO ABOUT YOUR SORT OFF LOVE.

PS HOMO.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


< HO HO. I BET THIS GUYS TALKING ABOUT YOU. K BAI. >

:angry:
Posted by: Stephen Elliott on June 17 2007,16:12

Quote (Arden Chatfield @ June 16 2007,20:19)
Well, I finally put that Sri Lankan 'Larich's Red Hot Curry Paste' to use with a bunch of chicken thighs. The intructions said use one tablespoon, but that sounded like way too little, so I used about 4 tablespoons. The instructions also said "add a tablepoon of chili powder if you wish", but I felt sure that mere chili powder would get totally drowned in the face of curry paste, so instead I added a tablepoon of cayenne pepper, in case the paste wasn't hot. Sri Lankan curry paste is real different from Indian curry paste, and smells like no Indian restaurant I've ever been to. The salient difference is supposed to be that they roast their curry powder before using it, which actually makes a big difference. Also, you can really taste the black pepper in Sri Lankan curries, which isn't very Indian (in my limited experience).

Oh yes, and I also had a yellow onion which I put through a blender. Turned it to liquid in 30 seconds, which was great, since I wanted the onion taste but didn't need onion texture. And I fucking hate chopping onions by hand. I think I'll do it that way from now on.

The result: it was really good, and seriously hot, to the level of scalp-sweating, but not to an unmanageable level. I downed two large glasses of milk, but the heat wasn't a deal breaker and I enjoyed it. (And my wife seemed to like it fine, too.) And, I felt quite vindicated in my impulse to quadruple the amount of paste and to replace the wimpy old chili powder with straightup cayenne. If I'd followed the recipe to the letter, it would have only been a little warm. Hmph.

I was considering trying to make a toned-down phaal tonight, but I don't have any habaneros, onions or coriander, so I'm thinking of going with < this >, instead, as a good lazy man's option.

I know using curry pastes wouldn't impress a purist or a real Indian cook, but if your cooking skill levels are as mediocre as mine, they're a total boon. Totally scratches your itch for something good 'n hot.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


I am baffled. Is the reason you dislike chopping onions by hand because they cause a mild irritaion to your eyes? If so, why eat stupidly hot dishes?

Another question. What is the difference between cayenne pepper and chile powder? I think a difference exists but on reading how the spices are made they sound the same.
Posted by: Arden Chatfield on June 17 2007,17:18



---------------------QUOTE-------------------
I am baffled. Is the reason you dislike chopping onions by hand because they cause a mild irritaion to your eyes? If so, why eat stupidly hot dishes?
---------------------QUOTE-------------------



It's not only that, it's also the chopping is a nuisance.

The difference is that the taste of hot foods is pleasant, while onions burning your eyes is not. The two sensations don't have much in common.



---------------------QUOTE-------------------

Another question. What is the difference between cayenne pepper and chile powder? I think a difference exists but on reading how the spices are made they sound the same.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------



Cayenne pepper contains only ground cayenne pepper, while what's called '< chili powder >' in the US is a spice mix which also includes other things, like cumin, garlic and oregano. It's nowhere near as hot as straightup cayenne pepper. Trust me.
Posted by: stevestory on June 17 2007,17:53

Quote (Stephen Elliott @ June 17 2007,17:12)
I am baffled. Is the reason you dislike chopping onions by hand because they cause a mild irritaion to your eyes? If so, why eat stupidly hot dishes?
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Well...uh...um...because Shut Up, that's why.

:angry:
Posted by: Stephen Elliott on June 17 2007,18:07

Quote (Arden Chatfield @ June 17 2007,17:18)


---------------------QUOTE-------------------
I am baffled. Is the reason you dislike chopping onions by hand because they cause a mild irritaion to your eyes? If so, why eat stupidly hot dishes?
---------------------QUOTE-------------------



It's not only that, it's also the chopping is a nuisance.

The difference is that the taste of hot foods is pleasant, while onions burning your eyes is not. The two sensations don't have much in common.

 

---------------------QUOTE-------------------

Another question. What is the difference between cayenne pepper and chile powder? I think a difference exists but on reading how the spices are made they sound the same.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------



Cayenne pepper contains only ground cayenne pepper, while what's called '< chili powder >' in the US is a spice mix which also includes other things, like cumin, garlic and oregano. It's nowhere near as hot as straightup cayenne pepper. Trust me.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Bah Humbug. Onion is best eaten raw and only white onions need aply (with the exception of Fajitas). I delight in the texture of raw onion (just love the way they crunch). Cooked onions tend to be too soft.

Saying that. For certain meats I do like the flavour of cooking them with onions. I then prefer to throw the cooked onion away and eat the meat with raw onion garnish. Lovely.

As to Cayenne peper. I love it. Particularly on mild piza. Cayenne pepper tends to "enliven" my lips where "chile powder" doesn't.
Posted by: Stephen Elliott on June 17 2007,18:11

Quote (stevestory @ June 17 2007,17:53)
Quote (Stephen Elliott @ June 17 2007,17:12)
I am baffled. Is the reason you dislike chopping onions by hand because they cause a mild irritaion to your eyes? If so, why eat stupidly hot dishes?
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Well...uh...um...because Shut Up, that's why.

:angry:
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Sorry. I forgot to shut -up.
Posted by: snoeman on June 17 2007,18:16

Menu tonight:

Grilled Copper River King salmon
Braised kale with bacon and balsamic
Yukon Gold mashed potatoes
Posted by: Crabby Appleton on June 18 2007,02:45

Been a while since I've posted here but the discussion about onions lit a bulb in my head about what to do with the last Vidalias from this year (The color of an onion has nothing to do with whether it's sweet or not).

I find chopping onions, garlic and other veg relaxing in a mindless sort of way so I ransacked the larder last night and made some olive relish and tonight the missus and I ate muffaletas.

I'd have put on a seersucker suit if I'd owned one.

I also confirmed (at least to my feeble taste buds) that Fat Tire Amber Ale is distinctly different in 12 oz and 24 oz bottles. The 12 oz bottles seem to be hoppier and less malty. My preference is for the 24 oz bottle flavor which is out of character for me.
Posted by: Louis on June 18 2007,04:51

{Just waiting for July and those Dorset Nagas}

I will post before and after photos!

Louis
Posted by: deejay on June 18 2007,10:48

Quote (stevestory @ June 17 2007,17:53)
   
Quote (Stephen Elliott @ June 17 2007,17:12)
I am baffled. Is the reason you dislike chopping onions by hand because they cause a mild irritaion to your eyes? If so, why eat stupidly hot dishes?
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Well...uh...um...because Shut Up, that's why.

:angry:
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


< Why onions make you cry >

One thing the article doesn't mention is that you can prevent the sulfuric acid from forming on the moisture on your eyes by running the onion under water for a second or two.  The sulfuric acid will form mostly in the water on the onion rather than on your eyes.  

I've had good luck with this, but mostly I just try to chop faster.  I didn't spend all that money on my knives just so that they'd look good hanging on a magnetic holder.  Well, maybe in part  ;) , but I do like to think I'm halfway decent with them.  And cleaning a knife is a lot easier than cleaning a food processor.  

One other downside to the rinsing technique is that if you're making a salad, it's nice to have dry ingredients so that the dressing clings better.  I go through enough paper towels patting down the lettuce after rinsing the dirt off the "prewashed" stuff I buy, and having wet onions means having one more thing to dry off.
Posted by: deejay on June 18 2007,10:56

Quote (stevestory @ June 15 2007,04:15)
Wiggum: Afternoon, Homer.  Care for some chili?  I've added an extra ingredient just for you. The merciless peppers of Quetzlzacatenango! Grown deep in the jungle primeval by the inmates of a Guatemalan insane asylum.
Homer: Uh, Wiggy?  My chili's getting cold.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


From the same episode, after Homer is able to down the peppers by coating his throat with melted candle wax:

 

---------------------QUOTE-------------------
Nice try, Chief Wiggum.  Don't quit your day job.  Whatever that is.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------



I think of this line every time I see Dembski fall flat on his face with a new post about how ID is growing by leaps and bounds.
Posted by: Stephen Elliott on June 18 2007,11:26

Quote (deejay @ June 18 2007,10:48)
< Why onions make you cry >
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Wow!
Mouth breathers is a term used here to indicate sub-normal intelligence. Seems (from the link) they have the edge when it comes to smarts.
Posted by: deejay on June 18 2007,11:47

Quote (Stephen Elliott @ June 18 2007,11:26)
 
Quote (deejay @ June 18 2007,10:48)
< Why onions make you cry >
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Wow!

---------------------QUOTE-------------------



Yeah, that is a sorry-ass article.  My bad for even linking to it.

 
Quote (Stephen Elliott @ June 18 2007,11:26)
Mouth breathers is a term used here to indicate sub-normal intelligence. Seems (from the link) they have the edge when it comes to smarts.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------



Check out #7 on < this list >
Posted by: Alan Fox on June 18 2007,15:11

Quote (Louis @ June 17 2007,23:51)
{Just waiting for July and those Dorset Nagas}

I will post before and after photos!

Louis
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Looking forward to seeing this, you mad, impetuous fool!
Posted by: Richardthughes on June 18 2007,15:16

Quote (Alan Fox @ June 18 2007,15:11)
Quote (Louis @ June 17 2007,23:51)
{Just waiting for July and those Dorset Nagas}

I will post before and after photos!

Louis
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Looking forward to seeing this, you mad, impetuous fool!
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


HOT PEPPERS YES, HOT MILFS NO.

ALAN, WHAT A WORLD YOU LIVE IN.
Posted by: Alan Fox on June 18 2007,15:32

Quote (Richardthughes @ June 18 2007,10:16)
   
Quote (Alan Fox @ June 18 2007,15:11)
   
Quote (Louis @ June 17 2007,23:51)
{Just waiting for July and those Dorset Nagas}

I will post before and after photos!

Louis
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Looking forward to seeing this, you mad, impetuous fool!
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


HOT PEPPERS YES, HOT MILFS NO.

ALAN, WHAT A WORLD YOU LIVE IN.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------



Yeah, I'm so damn lucky! :D  BTW may I interject Balti?
Posted by: Richardthughes on June 18 2007,15:41

Quote (Alan Fox @ June 18 2007,15:32)
Quote (Richardthughes @ June 18 2007,10:16)
   
Quote (Alan Fox @ June 18 2007,15:11)
     
Quote (Louis @ June 17 2007,23:51)
{Just waiting for July and those Dorset Nagas}

I will post before and after photos!

Louis
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Looking forward to seeing this, you mad, impetuous fool!
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


HOT PEPPERS YES, HOT MILFS NO.

ALAN, WHAT A WORLD YOU LIVE IN.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------



Yeah, I'm so damn lucky! :D  BTW may I interject Balti?
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Sparkhill Baltis. Magic. It means "bucket", dontchaknow. Finally Birmingham has a redeeming quality.





< B B B B Birmingham! >
Posted by: Alan Fox on June 18 2007,15:50



---------------------QUOTE-------------------
Sparkhill Baltis.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------



The Paradise, Stoney Lane, for example. My favourite was a place in Moseley where the proprietor explained the correct use of kulfi ice cream (to be applied the next morning as a poultice).
Posted by: Richardthughes on June 18 2007,15:52

Quote (Alan Fox @ June 18 2007,15:50)


---------------------QUOTE-------------------
Sparkhill Baltis.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------



The Paradise, Stoney Lane, for example. My favourite was a place in Moseley where the proprietor explained the correct use of kulfi ice cream (to be applied the next morning as a poultice).
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


They were five quid when I frequented. Balti and a few beers. Your lower intestine files for divorce the next day. Plus I had a French bird at the time. Happy days.
Posted by: Alan Fox on June 18 2007,15:55

You weren't at University of Birmingham, by any chance?
Posted by: Richardthughes on June 18 2007,15:59

Quote (Alan Fox @ June 18 2007,15:55)
You weren't at University of Birmingham, by any chance?
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


UCE formerly Birmingham Poly back in the day.
Posted by: Alan Fox on June 18 2007,16:12

Quote (Richardthughes @ June 18 2007,10:59)
 
Quote (Alan Fox @ June 18 2007,15:55)
You weren't at University of Birmingham, by any chance?
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


UCE formerly Birmingham Poly back in the day.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Bloody hell, you got out of Perry Barr alive?

Edit: alcohol induced spelling errors, Ah'm awah tae ma beid!
Posted by: Richardthughes on June 18 2007,16:33

I have scars, but they are part of me now.

night Alan - dream of some hawt MILF action.

(But not FtK)
Posted by: stevestory on June 18 2007,20:26

tonight's dinner: chicken breasts soaked overnight in Texas Pete, then doused with some store-bought jerk seasoning mix, and baked 35 mins. Drinks: Twisted Tea and some Heineken.

Conclusion: Texas Pete tastes good, but isn't remotely spicy enough.

I still need to find a good sauce which is significantly hotter than Tabasco sauce, but not retarded hot like Dave's Insanity Sauce.
Posted by: carlsonjok on June 18 2007,20:40

Quote (stevestory @ June 18 2007,20:26)
tonight's dinner:
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


You know, Steve, with you recounting your culinary activities every night, I am starting to wonder if you are trolling for a husband.
Posted by: stevestory on June 18 2007,20:47

LOL if i were, i wouldn't be here. I'd be over at the cosmetology school on Franklin Street. There are many dudes there of the Arden persuasion, if you know what I mean.
Posted by: carlsonjok on June 18 2007,20:52

Quote (stevestory @ June 18 2007,20:26)
I still need to find a good sauce which is significantly hotter than Tabasco sauce, but not retarded hot like Dave's Insanity Sauce.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


I guess it depends on how you define "significantly." There is a Scoville scale, with brand names, at < Chilliworld. >

I like the flavor that pepper sauces give, but don't seek out the heat.  I personally like the flavor of this, admittedly mild, sauce:


Posted by: Arden Chatfield on June 18 2007,20:52



---------------------QUOTE-------------------
There are many dudes there of the Arden persuasion, if you know what I mean.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


You mean people with lives?  :angry:
Posted by: Arden Chatfield on June 18 2007,20:58



---------------------QUOTE-------------------
I still need to find a good sauce which is significantly hotter than Tabasco sauce, but not retarded hot like Dave's Insanity Sauce.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------



Don't any stores out there carry Tabasco's habanero sauce?


Posted by: stevestory on June 18 2007,20:59

Quote (carlsonjok @ June 18 2007,21:52)
Quote (stevestory @ June 18 2007,20:26)
I still need to find a good sauce which is significantly hotter than Tabasco sauce, but not retarded hot like Dave's Insanity Sauce.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


I guess it depends on how you define "significantly." There is a Scoville scale, with brand names, at < Chilliworld. >

I like the flavor that pepper sauces give, but don't seek out the heat.  I personally like the flavor of this, admittedly mild, sauce:


---------------------QUOTE-------------------


That sauce is tasty. Pretty mild. In terms of heat vs availability, I think I'm going to go get some of the Tabasco Habanero sauce.
Posted by: Arden Chatfield on June 18 2007,21:04

Quote (carlsonjok @ June 18 2007,20:52)
   
Quote (stevestory @ June 18 2007,20:26)
I still need to find a good sauce which is significantly hotter than Tabasco sauce, but not retarded hot like Dave's Insanity Sauce.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


I guess it depends on how you define "significantly." There is a Scoville scale, with brand names, at < Chilliworld. >

I like the flavor that pepper sauces give, but don't seek out the heat.  I personally like the flavor of this, admittedly mild, sauce:


---------------------QUOTE-------------------


THATS TOTAL WUSSY HOMO SAUCE. YOU HOMO. :angry:


Posted by: Arden Chatfield on June 18 2007,21:15

< And for complete loonies... >

:O
Posted by: carlsonjok on June 18 2007,21:29

Quote (Arden Chatfield @ June 18 2007,21:04)

---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Actually, I like that, too. I never remember to buy some to keep at home, but I always flavor my pho with that when we go out for Vietnamese.
Posted by: Ichthyic on June 18 2007,23:17

that stuff is in every chinese and thai restaurant around here, but I can't seem to find it in any of the local markets.

OTOH, it's made in Rosemead, so I could probably order some right from the factory.

oh, and it's not that hot; maybe just slightly hotter than cholula, but the pepper flavor overcomes the vinegar more.

i use it like ketchup on those fried noodles at the chinese restaurant.

very tasty. absolutely fantastic on scrambled eggs too.
Posted by: Louis on June 19 2007,07:41

Quote (Arden Chatfield @ June 19 2007,03:52)


---------------------QUOTE-------------------
There are many dudes there of the Arden persuasion, if you know what I mean.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


You mean people with lives?  :angry:
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Now now Arden, there's no need to enter the realm of wild fantasy. We all know you have no life, Richard told us, he's been stalking you. The rest of us get a weekly bulletin, a digest of Arden related trivia.

It's called "Ardent" (geddit) and Rich is always muttering about you being "Teh Sexi Hawt" or something. I can't claim to know what it means. He DOES mention that all this big talk about FTK and MILFs and the like is just window dressing to hide his obsessive love for you quite a bit though. Sorry, we all thought you knew.

Don't get me started on his previous campaign with Carlsonjok. Where do you think Rich keeps getting those photos from? They really are Carlsonjok you know.

Ah the twisted webs of lust that Hughes boy weaves.

Louis
Posted by: Louis on June 19 2007,07:43

Quote (carlsonjok @ June 19 2007,04:29)
Actually, I like that, too. I never remember to buy some to keep at home, but I always flavor my pho with that when we go out for Vietnamese.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


I've never heard it called a pho before. Kinky.

Louis
Posted by: Arden Chatfield on June 19 2007,11:30

Quote (Louis @ June 19 2007,07:43)
 
Quote (carlsonjok @ June 19 2007,04:29)
Actually, I like that, too. I never remember to buy some to keep at home, but I always flavor my pho with that when we go out for Vietnamese.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


I've never heard it called a pho before. Kinky.

Louis
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Ba-dum ching!
Posted by: Louis on June 19 2007,11:59

Quote (Arden Chatfield @ June 19 2007,18:30)
Quote (Louis @ June 19 2007,07:43)
 
Quote (carlsonjok @ June 19 2007,04:29)
Actually, I like that, too. I never remember to buy some to keep at home, but I always flavor my pho with that when we go out for Vietnamese.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


I've never heard it called a pho before. Kinky.

Louis
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Ba-dum ching!
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Thankew thankew. Please tip your waitress.

Louis
Posted by: Stephen Elliott on June 19 2007,12:29

Quote (Arden Chatfield @ June 18 2007,21:15)
< And for complete loonies... >

:O
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Have you read the disclaimer for that product?
< Here. >
Who would be daft enough to eat something that contains a warning that contact with skin will cause severe burning? Wait, don't bother to answer that. There is certain to be some people.

EDIT: Wow! £245 for 1ml. That is what? About $400.
Posted by: Arden Chatfield on June 19 2007,13:07

Quote (Stephen Elliott @ June 19 2007,12:29)
Quote (Arden Chatfield @ June 18 2007,21:15)
< And for complete loonies... >

:O
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Have you read the disclaimer for that product?
< Here. >
Who would be daft enough to eat something that contains a warning that contact with skin will cause severe burning? Wait, don't bother to answer that. There is certain to be some people.

EDIT: Wow! £245 for 1ml. That is what? About $400.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


I like disclaimer number 5:



---------------------QUOTE-------------------
I am not inebriated or impaired in any way, and I am fully able to make a sound decision about the purchase if these products.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Posted by: Richardthughes on June 19 2007,13:25

Quote (Louis @ June 19 2007,11:59)
Quote (Arden Chatfield @ June 19 2007,18:30)
 
Quote (Louis @ June 19 2007,07:43)
   
Quote (carlsonjok @ June 19 2007,04:29)
Actually, I like that, too. I never remember to buy some to keep at home, but I always flavor my pho with that when we go out for Vietnamese.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


I've never heard it called a pho before. Kinky.

Louis
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Ba-dum ching!
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Thankew thankew. Please tip your waitress.

Louis
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Pho pass.
Posted by: Stephen Elliott on June 19 2007,13:40

Quote (Arden Chatfield @ June 19 2007,13:07)
I like disclaimer number 5:



---------------------QUOTE-------------------
I am not inebriated or impaired in any way, and I am fully able to make a sound decision about the purchase if these products.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Yes. So do I, that is funny.

This is my 3rd atempt to reply , so sorry if multiple posts apear.
Posted by: stevestory on June 20 2007,16:49

So I bought some chicken breasts at Harris Teeter. Off I went to the hot sauce aisle. I frowned when I saw that the object of my affection, a bottle of habanero tabasco sauce, was ten times the price per volume of texas pete! 2 oz of habanero tabasco was $1.50 and 32 oz of texas pete was $2.05. Hmm.

So now I'm back at the apt with a 32 oz bottle of texas pete and 4 habanero peppers. Wondering how many of the latter to blend into the former. I'm thinking 3.
Posted by: Arden Chatfield on June 20 2007,17:05

Quote (stevestory @ June 20 2007,16:49)
So I bought some chicken breasts at Harris Teeter. Off I went to the hot sauce aisle. I frowned when I saw that the object of my affection, a bottle of habanero tabasco sauce, was ten times the price per volume of texas pete! 2 oz of habanero tabasco was $1.50 and 32 oz of texas pete was $2.05. Hmm.

So now I'm back at the apt with a 32 oz bottle of texas pete and 4 habanero peppers. Wondering how many of the latter to blend into the former. I'm thinking 3.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


They didn't have one of the standard 5oz bottles for Tabasco habanero?

Eh, $1.50 isn't much, I probably would have bought it anyway.

If the Texas Pete's is as wimpy as you say, it sounds like you'll need 3 habaneros to really scratch your itch.
Posted by: Ichthyic on June 20 2007,17:05

scale down and experiment?

put 1/3 of a pepper into about 3 oz of sauce and see what happens?
Posted by: Arden Chatfield on June 20 2007,17:07

I think you can do mail orders from the Tabasco website.
Posted by: stevestory on June 20 2007,19:06

Back from tennis. So I put the whole bottle in the blender with 2 habaneros. The resulting product has some bounce to the ounce. It's going on some jerk chicken and then into the oven. We'll know the results in an hour.
Posted by: Ichthyic on June 20 2007,19:15

I'm beginning to think you might wanna rename this thread:

fire and brimstone

:D
Posted by: stevestory on June 20 2007,19:21

Quote (Ichthyic @ June 20 2007,20:15)
I'm beginning to think you might wanna rename this thread:

fire and brimstone

:D
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Brimstone? Maybe if we start cooking some eggs.

:p
Posted by: Ichthyic on June 20 2007,19:23

too late; that's a very common usage of hot sauces in my house.

Machaca con huevos with lots of spicy salsa.

mmmm.

in fact, you've got me thinking about twist I'd like to call jerked machaca con huevos.
Posted by: Arden Chatfield on June 21 2007,19:41

Quote (stevestory @ June 20 2007,19:06)
Back from tennis. So I put the whole bottle in the blender with 2 habaneros. The resulting product has some bounce to the ounce. It's going on some jerk chicken and then into the oven. We'll know the results in an hour.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Well.........?
Posted by: stevestory on June 21 2007,19:54

Oh. Eh. It was okay. The chicken, unmarinated and baked, was too dry. Nice and spicy, though. The habaneros blended into the Texas Pete certainly improved it.
Posted by: KCdgw on June 23 2007,07:56

As far as ESB's go, I prefer Fuller's over Red Hook.

I did get to try a nice beer at the Bonnaroo Music festival last week. It's a Vermont brew called Magic Hat. My daughter, who goes to school in Vermont, had been telling me about it, but it's not distributed here in Missouri. So I grabbed the chance at the beer table at the festival. Very, very, nice and refreshing.
Posted by: stevestory on June 23 2007,09:54

I had Magic Hat No. 9 for the first time a few weeks ago. Good stuff.
Posted by: stevestory on June 26 2007,19:15

Tonight's dish: < Cashew Chicken, basically following this recipe. >
Minus the peanut oil. (allergic) And plus about a tablespoon of cayenne pepper.

And to drink, Foster's Lager.
Posted by: IanBrown_101 on June 26 2007,19:22

Quote (stevestory @ June 26 2007,19:15)
Tonight's dish: < Cashew Chicken, basically following this recipe. >
Minus the peanut oil. (allergic) And plus about a tablespoon of cayenne pepper.

And to drink, Foster's Lager.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Sounds pretty damn good.

I'm rather a whizz in the kitchen, if I do say so myself, and I love making my own curries. Get yourself a recipie book, look at what ingredients go with what, then add what you like.
Posted by: Arden Chatfield on June 26 2007,19:52

Last weekend I had pretty good luck with a chicken tikka masala recipe on < this > product. The other ingredients aside from the paste were a quarter cup of yogurt, crushed tomatoes, and an onion. I followed the recipe VERY closely and I quite liked how it came out. My wife said it tasted just like how a restaurant would make it. Not particularly hot, though -- what Patak's calls 'medium', I'd call 'mild'.

Anyway, for reasons that I can't really explain, I am going to attempt the following recipe with six chicken thighs tonight:

 

---------------------QUOTE-------------------
Mutton Dish (Phaal)

Ingredients

1. Mutton pieces or Chicken 1/2 kg.
2. Bunch of Coriander/Cilantro. More than a handful. Well chopped.
3. 4-5 Red Chillies
4. 1 tbsp Pepper Powder.
5. Ginger-Garlic paste- 1 tbsp
6. 2 Onions
7. 1 Tomato
8. 3-4 Potatoes
9. Oil - 2 tbsp
10. Salt to taste

Method


Fry the onions for a while. Then add ginger-garlic paste and fry a little longer.
Make a paste out of Coriander, red chillies, pepper powder, tomato and fried onions (from step 1 ).
Take a wok and put in the paste and heat well. Keep stirring until paste thickens and the raw smell disappears.
Add some water, mutton or chicken pieces along with potatoes and cook for 20 minutes.
If it is mutton you will have to pressure cook for 3-4 whistles. Stir once in a while and add water if you require a little extra gravy.
Happy cooking.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------



I don't have any red chilis, so I'm either going to use two habaneros, or some Kohinoor brand red chili paste I got from my favorite Indian grocery.

I'm making a separate meal (hamburgers) for my wife and daughter so they don't have to suffer as I have chosen to suffer.

I've seen conflicting reports as to whether phaal is 'authentic'. Some say Indian restauranteurs in England invented it to punish boorish drunken white guys who show up at 11pm and ask for 'the hottest thing you've got'. Others say it's a genuine recipe for fish curry cooked in Bangladesh.

I'll report back if I live. If I die, you can blame Louis.
Posted by: IanBrown_101 on June 26 2007,19:55

Ah, Pataks are rather good (I also like Sharwoods).

I believe Phaal is about as Indian as Chicken Tikka Masala (invented in Glasgow no matter WHAT the people from Birmingham say), since I've seen a variety of things mentione as being "traditional" although the name might be real, the sheer pointlessness of the sauce is probably not.
Posted by: Ichthyic on June 26 2007,19:58



---------------------QUOTE-------------------
I'll report back if I live. If I die, you can blame Louis.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------



Can't I just blame Louis in either case?
Posted by: Arden Chatfield on June 26 2007,20:06

Quote (IanBrown_101 @ June 26 2007,19:55)
Ah, Pataks are rather good (I also like Sharwoods).

I believe Phaal is about as Indian as Chicken Tikka Masala (invented in Glasgow no matter WHAT the people from Birmingham say), since I've seen a variety of things mentione as being "traditional" although the name might be real, the sheer pointlessness of the sauce is probably not.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


I think it's pretty much indisputable that Tikka Masala is the Chop Suey of Indian food. Invented by Asians, yes, but far far away from Asia.

As for Patak's I quite like < this > one. I'd like to try their Jalfrezi paste, but I haven't been able to find it yet.

Larich makes some interestingly bizarre Sri Lankan pastes, tho they don't seem to have their own website.
Posted by: Arden Chatfield on June 26 2007,20:07

Quote (Ichthyic @ June 26 2007,19:58)


---------------------QUOTE-------------------
I'll report back if I live. If I die, you can blame Louis.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------



Can't I just blame Louis in either case?
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Good point. Whatever happens, blame Louis.  :angry:
Posted by: carlsonjok on June 26 2007,20:07

For what it is worth, I tried < this recipe > for Tinga over the weekend.  It had a great flavor with just the right amount of heat (for me).  Fire-eaters could probably spice it up even with a few more chipotles or some cayenne.
Posted by: IanBrown_101 on June 26 2007,20:08

Never really tried their curry paste, but I'd be willing to chuck it in any curry I do.

I've never heard of Larich...I don't think I've seen their stuff on sale over here.
Posted by: Arden Chatfield on June 26 2007,20:13

Quote (IanBrown_101 @ June 26 2007,20:08)
Never really tried their curry paste, but I'd be willing to chuck it in any curry I do.

I've never heard of Larich...I don't think I've seen their stuff on sale over here.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


I mentioned their stuff on this thread a week or two ago. It's imported from Sri Lanka. Sinhalese curries seem to be VERY different from Indian ones. Their 'Red Hot Curry Paste' is fun. I discussed my experiment with it < here. >

Better get cooking, it's after 6pm here.
Posted by: IanBrown_101 on June 26 2007,20:15

I've never actually tried Sri Lankan cuisine.

I'll tell you what is good though, Nepalese. It's simply the greatest food I've ever had. Hot and spicy, yet full of flavour, and with milder dishes to help tone the really hot ones down.
Posted by: Arden Chatfield on June 26 2007,20:19

I dont think there are ANY Sri Lankan restaurants in the Bay Area, tho there are a handful of Nepalese ones. They're often run by Tibetan refugees from Nepal, so they often combine Tibetan and Nepalese food. But I haven't had it often enough to make generalizations about it.

Korean is maybe my favorite cuisine, tho Pakistani is close behind. Try Burmese, if you can find one.

I'm all hungry now! Gotta stop procrastinating and get started!
Posted by: IanBrown_101 on June 26 2007,20:21

Well, there's a few "asian" restaurants/takeaways in Aberystwyth, which is handy, and theres a Nepalese restaurant/takeaway in Nuneaton. In fact, I'm getting food from there to celebrate my birthday on Friday. Christ.
Posted by: stevestory on June 26 2007,20:22

I used too much water, I think. The sauce was a little too loose and globby. It tasted good, though. The oyster sauce, which I'd never known of until tonight, was the perfect flavor. Next time I'm going to crank the heat up, though. Probably by adding a habanero, though all this talk of indian food and red chilies, has me thinking I should go with those. But is red chili the name for them, or is there a more specific name I should look for in the grocery store?
Posted by: IanBrown_101 on June 26 2007,20:24

Quote (stevestory @ June 26 2007,20:22)
I used too much water, I think. The sauce was a little too loose and globby. It tasted good, though. The oyster sauce, which I'd never known of until tonight, was the perfect flavor. Next time I'm going to crank the heat up, though. Probably by adding a habanero, though all this talk of indian food and red chilies, has me thinking I should go with those. But is red chili the name for them, or is there a more specific name I should look for in the grocery store?
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Depends on the store. If it's a fairly comercial place (I know they all are, but you know what I mean) red will probably be enough, but if you want a specific heat, or are going to a proper asian/indian store, then you may have to look up names. I know of a few, depends on how hot you want them to be.
Posted by: stevestory on June 26 2007,21:09

I go through periods of being either upper middle class or borderline-homeless poor, depending on what job I have at the moment. Right now I'm pretty far on the poor end. So I often weigh my food purchases by the price-per-pound at Food Lion. In terms of premade, heat-and-eat vittles, it's hard to beat the Food Lion brand pizzas. They're the most mediocre pizzas you'll ever eat, but at ~$1.30/lb they're pretty damn cheap. Anybody have any suggestions for very cheap, yet edible, meals?
Posted by: Arden Chatfield on June 26 2007,21:42

Quote (stevestory @ June 26 2007,21:09)
I go through periods of being either upper middle class or borderline-homeless poor, depending on what job I have at the moment. Right now I'm pretty far on the poor end. So I often weigh my food purchases by the price-per-pound at Food Lion. In terms of premade, heat-and-eat vittles, it's hard to beat the Food Lion brand pizzas. They're the most mediocre pizzas you'll ever eat, but at ~$1.30/lb they're pretty damn cheap. Anybody have any suggestions for very cheap, yet edible, meals?
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Well, when I was a grad student I made too little money to even file income taxes, and we frankly ate a lot of rice and beans. It's not that expensive to add a little chicken to that. Mexican food in general is a really good bet on a poverty budget.

If you have a bit more time, fried rice is easy and yummy, and you can make a massive batch of it in 30~40 minutes.  

It's not hard to eat decently on meager amounts of money, if you know what you're doing. People who think that being poor means you have to eat kraft mac & cheese all the time lack any imagination.
Posted by: stevestory on June 26 2007,21:50

yeah, I could probably make some black bean and chorizo burritos for around a buck a pound.
Posted by: Ichthyic on June 26 2007,22:38

*sigh*

ramen noodles with frozen peas/corn/soybeans and ground beef/chicken/turkey added.  Pepper oil for extra kick.

cost about .25 per meal if you get one of those 10/1 ramen deals.

I lived on that stuff as an undergrad, and the cost hasn't significantly increased in 20 years.

if you live near the coast and have a commercial fishing fleet nearby, you can often get great deals on fish if you buy straight from the docks at the END of the day, just before they give up to go home.

used to commonly get fresh king salmon (whole) for a buck a pound. Flounder and Rockfish even cheaper.
Posted by: Arden Chatfield on June 26 2007,23:21

Okay, I'm going to have to redo that phaal recipe. Consider that a test run. I'll try again in a week or two.

It was nice 'n hot and had a good flavor, but (a) it should have been hotter and (b) I put WAY too much tomato in it. I put in a third of a big can of crushed tomatoes in it (seemed like a good idea at the time), and I only put in one habanero 'cuz I was too timid. Dammit.

Next time: 3 tablespoons of the red chili paste, 2 habaneros, and VERY little tomato.

:angry:
Posted by: Ichthyic on June 26 2007,23:30

if the idea is to get tomato flavor without the "mush", maybe try adding sundried tomato strips instead?

I use those in a lot of sauces where i don't want the added crap that comes with fresh or canned tomatoes.
Posted by: snoeman on June 27 2007,00:14

Made < this > the other night.

Man, that was good.  Cooked it on one of < these >.  One of the best gifts my wife ever gave me.
Posted by: Arden Chatfield on June 27 2007,01:21

Quote (Ichthyic @ June 26 2007,23:30)
if the idea is to get tomato flavor without the "mush", maybe try adding sundried tomato strips instead?

I use those in a lot of sauces where i don't want the added crap that comes with fresh or canned tomatoes.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Actually, the problem is that the tomato taste overpowered everything else in it, including all the spices. It tasted too tomatoey.

I like sundried tomatoes a lot, too, like in pasta sauce & pizza. But I dunno if they'd quite work in a quasi-curry.
Posted by: Rev. BigDumbChimp on June 27 2007,07:32

Just stocked the fridge with these

< 90 Min IPA >

< Delirium Tremens >

< Stoudts Douple IPA >

< Imort Ale >

Also heading to this pizzaria for lunch. All local ingredients, all wood fired ovens. All good.

< EVO Pizza >

If anyone wants some BBQ restaurant reviews (as well as other crap) I have another blog up at < Pork and Whiskey >

I'll be updating with more reviews.


/shameless plug off
Posted by: Ichthyic on June 27 2007,13:03



---------------------QUOTE-------------------
Actually, the problem is that the tomato taste overpowered everything else in it, including all the spices
---------------------QUOTE-------------------



ah.  must have been some strong tomatoes

;)

still, I know what you mean; not all curries work well with tomatoes.  the tang just doesn't balance well.  I don't like them in a green curry.  I usually like a bit of tomato in a red curry, though.
Posted by: stevestory on June 28 2007,19:31

Tonight's dinner:
Food: DiGiorno Ultimate Supreme
Drinks: 375 ml Gilbey's Gin and Ginger Ale
après dinner: Skoal Wintergreen Pouches


Posted by: Arden Chatfield on June 28 2007,19:38

Quote (stevestory @ June 28 2007,19:31)
Tonight's dinner:
Food: DiGiorno Ultimate Supreme
Drinks: 375 ml Gilbey's Gin and Ginger Ale
après dinner: Skoal Wintergreen Pouches
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


You chew tobacco? ? ? ? ? ?   :O
Posted by: stevestory on June 28 2007,19:46

I used to chew Skoal and smoke Camels, but for the past three days I'm just relying on the Skoal. It's much, much healthier, although I prefer the quick blast of nicotine from the cigarette.

You know I grew up redneck, don'tcha?
Posted by: stevestory on June 28 2007,19:47

I'm glad Skoal makes pouches now. Those damn Bandits were too small. Needed like three or four of those to get going.
Posted by: stevestory on June 28 2007,19:50

In case you didn't know I'm somewhat redneck and my relatives are from Kentucky, here's a good example: in my extended family, chewing tobacco is seen as something you do as a kid, which you leave behind in your mid-teens when you switch to smoking.

I think the first time I was offered chewing tobacco, I was about nine. We were visiting relatives in Owensville, Ky.
Posted by: Arden Chatfield on June 28 2007,19:53

Quote (stevestory @ June 28 2007,19:46)
I used to chew Skoal and smoke Camels, but for the past three days I'm just relying on the Skoal. It's much, much healthier, although I prefer the quick blast of nicotine from the cigarette.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


'Healthier'???

Isn't that stuff sposta give people oral cancer?

 

---------------------QUOTE-------------------
You know I grew up redneck, don'tcha?
---------------------QUOTE-------------------



Yeah, I did, but... jesus...



---------------------QUOTE-------------------
In case you didn't know I'm somewhat redneck and my relatives are from Kentucky,
---------------------QUOTE-------------------



I thought it was north Florida.
Posted by: stevestory on June 28 2007,19:59

By the way, it's actually a treat to have a redneck heritage and work in technical fields. You should see the looks on people's faces when you explain, in a thick southern accent and with your bottom lip jutting out, that the gas won't cool down upon expanding because this here's a free expansion and those are irreversible but adiabatic, so while the entropy increases, the integral of F dV from V1 to V2 is zero, so the temperature can't change so long as it's just hydrogen and the van der Waals terms don't matter much.
Posted by: stevestory on June 28 2007,20:02

My immediate family is from North Florida. My extended family is from Kentucky. Why they thought middle-of-nowhere North Florida would be an improvement, I'll never know. Probably, they just wanted to move south to get away from those Kentucky winters, and didn't want to move to south Florida because they'd heard it was overrun by some type of Mexicans from Cuba.

(not kidding, that's how they think)
Posted by: stevestory on June 28 2007,20:10

Quote (Arden Chatfield @ June 28 2007,20:53)
Quote (stevestory @ June 28 2007,19:46)
I used to chew Skoal and smoke Camels, but for the past three days I'm just relying on the Skoal. It's much, much healthier, although I prefer the quick blast of nicotine from the cigarette.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


'Healthier'???

Isn't that stuff sposta give people oral cancer?
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


yeah, it does give people oral cancer. But at like a tenth the rate at which cigarettes give people lung cancer, which itself is not all that high. There's something about lung tissue, which makes it much more susceptible to cancer.

The risks aren't zero, but I believe in doing a clear-headed risk assessment. We decide the risk of dying on the roads is worth driving, and I've decided that for me the risk of oral cancer is worth the good feeling of chewing tobacco.
Posted by: stevestory on June 28 2007,20:19

Quote (Arden Chatfield @ June 28 2007,20:53)


---------------------QUOTE-------------------
In case you didn't know I'm somewhat redneck and my relatives are from Kentucky,
---------------------QUOTE-------------------



I thought it was north Florida.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


The last time I was in Kentucky was around 2004. My maternal grandma had died. She was my favorite person in the world. A little 98-lb redheaded spitfire who had that kind of moxie you see in sharp-tongued newspaper women in black-and-white movies. She ran a few businesses in the rural south in the 50's and 60's where menfolk would speak patronizingly to her until they realized she'd just negotiated away all their money. Went to Kentucky for the funeral and sat through about 15 minutes of a sermon from some fundy asshole who had no idea who she was and was just using the opportunity to threaten us all with hellfire. Had to very publicly walk out of the service because it was either that or just start beating him.

This has nothing to do with the thread, but hopefully people will appreciate it as a local color type story.
Posted by: Richardthughes on June 28 2007,22:37

ASK ME TO OPINE ABOUT MT FUZZ-LOGIC $299 FLUFFY RICE COOKER. DID I MENTION ITS GOT FUZZ LOGIC? AND IT COST $299.


HOMOS.
Posted by: Arden Chatfield on June 28 2007,22:45

Quote (Richardthughes @ June 28 2007,22:37)
ASK ME TO OPINE ABOUT MT FUZZ-LOGIC $299 FLUFFY RICE COOKER. DID I MENTION ITS GOT FUZZ LOGIC? AND IT COST $299.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


BUT HOW MUCH CSI DOES IT HAVE?


HOMO.

Posted by: Stephen Elliott on June 29 2007,09:06

Quote (IanBrown_101 @ June 26 2007,20:15)
I've never actually tried Sri Lankan cuisine.

I'll tell you what is good though, Nepalese.
It's simply the greatest food I've ever had. Hot and spicy, yet full of flavour, and with milder dishes to help tone the really hot ones down.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


My bolding

Yes Nepalese food is damned good.
I have worked with the Gurkhas on several occaisions and it was always a treat to get an invite to their parties. Good food and company (not to mention plenty of ale {Oops! Just mentioned it.}).

They had a particularly nice potato dish. Cool (ish) as you chewed and swallowed it, then seemed to get hotter afterwards.


EDIT:


---------------------QUOTE-------------------

stevestory

Posts: 4196
Joined: Oct. 2005
 (Permalink) Posted: June 26 2007,21:09 ?  
...
Anybody have any suggestions for very cheap, yet edible, meals?  
---------------------QUOTE-------------------



Rice and ginger? Boil some rice with a pinch of turmeric to give it a lovely yellow colour.
Then dry the rice and fry it with gratings of fresh root ginger.
Very tasty. Very cheap. You could always add the odd random ingredient to experiment for variety.
Posted by: stevestory on June 29 2007,12:09

today's lunch: steak burrito from Cosmic Cantina.

verdict: mediocre.
Posted by: Arden Chatfield on June 29 2007,15:10

Quote (Stephen Elliott @ June 29 2007,09:06)
Quote (IanBrown_101 @ June 26 2007,20:15)
I've never actually tried Sri Lankan cuisine.

I'll tell you what is good though, Nepalese.
It's simply the greatest food I've ever had. Hot and spicy, yet full of flavour, and with milder dishes to help tone the really hot ones down.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


My bolding

Yes Nepalese food is damned good.
I have worked with the Gurkhas on several occaisions and it was always a treat to get an invite to their parties. Good food and company (not to mention plenty of ale {Oops! Just mentioned it.}).

They had a particularly nice potato dish. Cool (ish) as you chewed and swallowed it, then seemed to get hotter afterwards.


EDIT:
 

---------------------QUOTE-------------------

stevestory

Posts: 4196
Joined: Oct. 2005
 (Permalink) Posted: June 26 2007,21:09 ?  
...
Anybody have any suggestions for very cheap, yet edible, meals?  
---------------------QUOTE-------------------



Rice and ginger? Boil some rice with a pinch of turmeric to give it a lovely yellow colour.
Then dry the rice and fry it with gratings of fresh root ginger.
Very tasty. Very cheap. You could always add the odd random ingredient to experiment for variety.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Dunno about having a dinner consisting of nothing but rice.

I mean, it'd seem a bit, uh, incomplete without SOME attempt at vegetables or protein. Seems like kind of a < kwashiorkor > diet.

Sorry. I've always wanted to use the word 'kwashiorkor'.
Posted by: Steviepinhead on June 29 2007,15:45

SteveStory:


---------------------QUOTE-------------------
My extended family is from Kentucky.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


I hope I kin git away with this, seein's how my "roots" trace back to Kentucky, Tennessee, and Joe-Jah.

But isn't "redneck extended family" an oxymoron?

Incest is best, and all thet they're.
Posted by: Louis on June 29 2007,16:04

Incest is best? Nahhh I disagree. Me, I say incest is relatively boring.

Louis
Posted by: stevestory on June 30 2007,17:41

There's some kind of sour taste in Texas Pete that I just don't like.
Posted by: Arden Chatfield on June 30 2007,17:42

Quote (stevestory @ June 30 2007,17:41)
There's some kind of sour taste in Texas Pete that I just don't like.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------



He doesn't like how you taste, either.

ba-dum-ching!

What are the listed ingredients?
Posted by: stevestory on June 30 2007,17:54



---------------------QUOTE-------------------
Production

The cayenne peppers used in Texas Pete hot sauce are aged for two years to soften their skins, and the company claims this also enhances concentration of capsaicin. The peppers are then combined with vinegar, salt, xanthan gum, and sodium benzoate. One of the controversies surrounding the sauce is the inclusion of xanthan gum, a thickener that allows for less overall pepper pulp in the recipe to achieve the desired texture, which some hot sauce fans find distasteful.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Posted by: stevestory on June 30 2007,17:55

I suppose it's the vinegar i'm disliking.
Posted by: Arden Chatfield on June 30 2007,21:21

Quote (stevestory @ June 30 2007,17:55)
I suppose it's the vinegar i'm disliking.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


I know this is heretical, but I've long thought tabasco was too vinegary.

Dinner: I wanted sth. hot and spicy but it's too busy here for me to be doing a bunch of kitchen work, so I'm making a (very) lazy man's curry with  < this > and < this >. I'd like to try < this, > but I haven't been able to find it yet.

I may retry that phaal minus tomatoes this coming week.

And Steve can get back to us about that habanero pot pie he was planning.
Posted by: stevestory on June 30 2007,21:49

No habanero pot pie. Made some chicken breasts tonight which I soaked in Pete's for about 2 hrs. Ended up throwing them all away because of that sour taste. I'm a little uncertain, maybe it wasn't the vinegar, after all, I like the vinegar style barbeque, maybe not as much as the tomato barbeque, but still, it's very vinegary and I don't know why I wouldn't like that...who knows. But I'm going back to Jerk chicken. No more of that sourness on the back edges of the tongue.

On the plus side, I'd blended Habaneros, garlic, and a peppercorn medley into the texas pete, so I had some scalp sweat going. All was not lost.

(as a side note, my roommate's boyfriend just moved in. Here on day 1 I took special note to say, "Shawn, I notice you moved in some Cholula. If you see this thick stuff in the big Texas Pete bottle, be forewarned. This is not Texas Pete. Do not use it as liberally as Texas Pete. This is Crazy Steve. It's a special blend. This is dangerous, and you need to be careful when using it. But I highly recommend it. Just be careful. Don't get it on your hands. Or your lips."
Posted by: Arden Chatfield on June 30 2007,22:36



---------------------QUOTE-------------------
No habanero pot pie. Made some chicken breasts tonight which I soaked in Pete's for about 2 hrs. Ended up throwing them all away because of that sour taste. I'm a little uncertain, maybe it wasn't the vinegar, after all, I like the vinegar style barbeque, maybe not as much as the tomato barbeque, but still, it's very vinegary and I don't know why I wouldn't like that...who knows. But I'm going back to Jerk chicken. No more of that sourness on the back edges of the tongue.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------



That's basically what fucked up the phaal I made last week -- too many tomatoes turned it sour. Also I put in two onions like the recipe said, but that was too many. So next time, very few maters and one SMALL onion.

I've never OD'd on garlic, but I have OD'd on onions.
Posted by: Richardthughes on July 01 2007,00:21

let me know if you want Hughes' $5 candy-cut vodka. It's "interesting juice" for fundy chics.
Posted by: Stephen Elliott on July 01 2007,00:34

Quote (stevestory @ June 30 2007,21:49)
"... This is dangerous, and you need to be careful when using it. But I highly recommend it. Just be careful. Don't get it on your hands. Or your lips."
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Yet you plan on eating it! There is something very wrong with that.
Posted by: stevestory on July 01 2007,16:26

If eating that is wrong, then baby, I don't want to be right.
Posted by: Rev. BigDumbChimp on July 01 2007,22:11

Quote (stevestory @ July 01 2007,16:26)
If eating that is wrong, then baby, I don't want to be right.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------




< Cheesburger Bitches. >
Posted by: stevestory on July 01 2007,22:23

Looking at his blog Pork and Whiskey, it is clear Rev. BigDumbChimp should be in charge of this thread.
Posted by: IanBrown_101 on July 02 2007,05:18

Quote (Arden Chatfield @ June 29 2007,15:10)
Dunno about having a dinner consisting of nothing but rice.

I mean, it'd seem a bit, uh, incomplete without SOME attempt at vegetables or protein. Seems like kind of a < kwashiorkor > diet.

Sorry. I've always wanted to use the word 'kwashiorkor'.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


I did it for three months.

All I had was rice, pasta, various spices and hebs and such, and occasionally a bit of meat or something that someone left for me. Oh, the joys of having exactly £0.00 in the bank with 3 months of uni to go.
Posted by: Rev. BigDumbChimp on July 02 2007,21:39

Just poured one of these.


Posted by: deejay on July 02 2007,22:22

Great blog, reverend!

I'm full right now, but your steak-frites recipe got me hungry all over again.  What kind of oil do you use for cooking the frites?  I ate at Les Halles once, and IIRC, they use peanut oil.
Posted by: Rev. BigDumbChimp on July 02 2007,22:26

Quote (deejay @ July 02 2007,22:22)
Great blog, reverend!

I'm full right now, but your steak-frites recipe got me hungry all over again.  What kind of oil do you use for cooking the frites?  I ate at Les Halles once, and IIRC, they use peanut oil.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Same. It does make a difference.
Posted by: deejay on July 02 2007,22:40

Nice touch.  How long can you use it for?
Posted by: Rev. BigDumbChimp on July 02 2007,22:43

Quote (deejay @ July 02 2007,22:40)
Nice touch.  How long can you use it for?
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Well. Honestly I sometimes use it only once. I don't make the fries that often and storing the used oil when it's not gettign used causes it to go rancid. So I may get two uses but alot of the time it is only one.

Expensive yes, but I'm a freak for doing it right with the right fresh ingredients and as much of the correct technique as possible.
Posted by: deejay on July 02 2007,22:51

Well, fly that freak flag high -- I look forward to your next blog entry.  There are still plenty of recipes in Steven Raichlen's How to Grill book I'd like to get to, but I'm happy for another source of inspiration.
Posted by: stevestory on July 03 2007,11:31

Lunch:




Posted by: IanBrown_101 on July 03 2007,11:51

For my lunch I cooked some sausages (Richmond, cheap but tasty) and cooked them with onions, spices (cumin, chilli, black onion seeds, corriander), lime juice and yoghurt. It was delicious.
Posted by: Rev. BigDumbChimp on July 03 2007,14:35

Quote (deejay @ July 02 2007,22:51)
Well, fly that freak flag high -- I look forward to your next blog entry.  There are still plenty of recipes in Steven Raichlen's How to Grill book I'd like to get to, but I'm happy for another source of inspiration.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


But duck fat really is the best way to do it if you're doing it in small batches....
Posted by: Richardthughes on July 03 2007,14:37

Quote (stevestory @ July 03 2007,11:31)
Lunch:




---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Not good...

???
Posted by: Arden Chatfield on July 03 2007,14:43

I'm afraid that 80% of the time, Steve eats like a 19-year-old college student.  ???

Well. A 19-year-old college student who chews tobacco, that is.
:p
Posted by: stevestory on July 03 2007,15:55

Quote (Richardthughes @ July 03 2007,15:37)
Quote (stevestory @ July 03 2007,11:31)
Lunch:




---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Not good...

???
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Well, it fulfills some of the major food groups, which IIRC, are Fried, Spicy, Sweet, Pizza, and Booze.
Posted by: stevestory on July 03 2007,15:58

Currently marinating some ground pork in spicy bbq sauce. In a few hours that will be baked, put on Pepperidge Farm hamburger buns, and served with Heineken.
Posted by: stevestory on July 03 2007,16:13

Quote (Arden Chatfield @ July 03 2007,15:43)
I'm afraid that 80% of the time, Steve eats like a 19-year-old college student.  ???

Well. A 19-year-old college student who chews tobacco, that is.
:p
---------------------QUOTE-------------------




speaking of which, I'm trying this Timber Wolf brand right now. It's like half the price of Skoal.
Posted by: stevestory on July 03 2007,16:28

I want to try some nasal snuff, but I haven't seen any around here (Chapel Hill, NC). I haven't really looked much, though.
Posted by: stevestory on July 03 2007,16:35

Say you want to marinate some meat. What conditions are best? Refrigerated? Out on the counter? For how long?
Posted by: Arden Chatfield on July 03 2007,16:45

Quote (stevestory @ July 03 2007,16:35)
Say you want to marinate some meat. What conditions are best? Refrigerated? Out on the counter? For how long?
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


I dunno 'bout where, but the longer the better.



---------------------QUOTE-------------------
want to try some nasal snuff, but I haven't seen any around here (Chapel Hill, NC). I haven't really looked much, though.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------



Good lord, you want to start dipping snuff? :O
Posted by: stevestory on July 03 2007,16:51

Chewing tobacco == dipping snuff. I already do that. It's the nasal kind I want to try. Very rare here in the States.
Posted by: Arden Chatfield on July 03 2007,17:05

Quote (stevestory @ July 03 2007,16:51)
Chewing tobacco == dipping snuff. I already do that. It's the nasal kind I want to try. Very rare here in the States.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


What's it called when you 'do it through your nose' like that?
Posted by: C.J.O'Brien on July 03 2007,17:05

Most recipes I've seen tell you to put marinading meat in the fridge. And depending on how acidic that marinade is, you don't want to soak meat in it for much longer than a couple of hours, in my experience. If the acidity is low and it's mostly herbs and spices, you might want to go with a rub.

I grilled a mean sage-rubbed pork-T the other weekend. Quite good.
Posted by: stevestory on July 03 2007,17:07

Quote (Arden Chatfield @ July 03 2007,18:05)
Quote (stevestory @ July 03 2007,16:51)
Chewing tobacco == dipping snuff. I already do that. It's the nasal kind I want to try. Very rare here in the States.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


What's it called when you 'do it through your nose' like that?
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


nasal snuff? I think that's what it's called. Anybody know if it's available in the US?
Posted by: Arden Chatfield on July 03 2007,17:32

Quote (stevestory @ July 03 2007,17:07)
Quote (Arden Chatfield @ July 03 2007,18:05)
Quote (stevestory @ July 03 2007,16:51)
Chewing tobacco == dipping snuff. I already do that. It's the nasal kind I want to try. Very rare here in the States.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


What's it called when you 'do it through your nose' like that?
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


nasal snuff? I think that's what it's called. Anybody know if it's available in the US?
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Dunno, two hundred years ago there was plenty of it here...
Posted by: Louis on July 03 2007,19:38

Quote (stevestory @ July 03 2007,21:55)
Quote (Richardthughes @ July 03 2007,15:37)
Quote (stevestory @ July 03 2007,11:31)
Lunch:




---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Not good...

???
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Well, it fulfills some of the major food groups, which IIRC, are Fried, Spicy, Sweet, Pizza, and Booze.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


You've missed out burnt crispy bits. NEVER skimp on burnt crispy bits, it can adversely affect your health.

Louis (Surgeon General of Deep Fried Mars Bars)
Posted by: J-Dog on July 03 2007,20:13

Quote (Louis @ July 03 2007,19:38)
Quote (stevestory @ July 03 2007,21:55)
Quote (Richardthughes @ July 03 2007,15:37)
 
Quote (stevestory @ July 03 2007,11:31)
Lunch:




---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Not good...

???
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Well, it fulfills some of the major food groups, which IIRC, are Fried, Spicy, Sweet, Pizza, and Booze.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


You've missed out burnt crispy bits. NEVER skimp on burnt crispy bits, it can adversely affect your health.

Louis (Surgeon General of Deep Fried Mars Bars)
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Deep Fried Mars Bars??!!??
Posted by: IanBrown_101 on July 03 2007,20:20

Quote (J-Dog @ July 03 2007,20:13)

Deep Fried Mars Bars??!!??
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Yep. Nothing says "Welcome to Scotland" like a snack that can cause you to have multiple heart attacks. They also do  deep fried pizza and deep fried haggis.

Addendum. A mars bar here is a Milky Way over across the pond, for those who don't know.

< Linky. >
Posted by: snoeman on July 04 2007,00:47

Quote (Arden Chatfield @ July 03 2007,16:45)
Quote (stevestory @ July 03 2007,16:35)
Say you want to marinate some meat. What conditions are best? Refrigerated? Out on the counter? For how long?
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


I dunno 'bout where, but the longer the better.



---------------------QUOTE-------------------
want to try some nasal snuff, but I haven't seen any around here (Chapel Hill, NC). I haven't really looked much, though.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------



Good lord, you want to start dipping snuff? :O
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


How long you marinate the meat depends on a number of factors, including what type it is and how it's been butchered.

If you're marinating some chicken that has already been cut up into smaller pieces for making kebabs, 30 minutes is plenty.

If you're marinating a larger cut of beef, lamb or pork, then give it at least an hour at room temperature, or several hours refrigerated.
Posted by: Stephen Elliott on July 04 2007,09:31

Quote (Rev. BigDumbChimp @ July 02 2007,21:39)
Just poured one of these.


---------------------QUOTE-------------------


I can't post images but...
Just poured 1 of these.
< http://www.thedrinkshop.com/products/nlpdetail.php?prodid=71 >
Pretty damn good. There is better, but this is very good value for money IMO.
Posted by: Rev. BigDumbChimp on July 04 2007,09:57

Quote (IanBrown_101 @ July 03 2007,20:20)
Quote (J-Dog @ July 03 2007,20:13)

Deep Fried Mars Bars??!!??
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Yep. Nothing says "Welcome to Scotland" like a snack that can cause you to have multiple heart attacks. They also do  deep fried pizza and deep fried haggis.

Addendum. A mars bar here is a Milky Way over across the pond, for those who don't know.

< Linky. >
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Interesting. Scotland sounds a lot like places here in the south eastern US.
Posted by: Arden Chatfield on July 04 2007,10:04

Quote (Rev. BigDumbChimp @ July 04 2007,09:57)
Quote (IanBrown_101 @ July 03 2007,20:20)
Quote (J-Dog @ July 03 2007,20:13)

Deep Fried Mars Bars??!!??
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Yep. Nothing says "Welcome to Scotland" like a snack that can cause you to have multiple heart attacks. They also do  deep fried pizza and deep fried haggis.

Addendum. A mars bar here is a Milky Way over across the pond, for those who don't know.

< Linky. >
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Interesting. Scotland sounds a lot like places here in the south eastern US.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


< There's a very good reason for that. >
Posted by: Stephen Elliott on July 04 2007,10:32

Quote (Arden Chatfield @ July 04 2007,10:04)
Quote (Rev. BigDumbChimp @ July 04 2007,09:57)
Quote (IanBrown_101 @ July 03 2007,20:20)
 
Quote (J-Dog @ July 03 2007,20:13)

Deep Fried Mars Bars??!!??
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Yep. Nothing says "Welcome to Scotland" like a snack that can cause you to have multiple heart attacks. They also do  deep fried pizza and deep fried haggis.

Addendum. A mars bar here is a Milky Way over across the pond, for those who don't know.

< Linky. >
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Interesting. Scotland sounds a lot like places here in the south eastern US.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


< There's a very good reason for that. >
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Then again. I do believe that the people now known as Scots originally came from Ireland.
Posted by: Rev. BigDumbChimp on July 04 2007,10:58

Quote (Arden Chatfield @ July 04 2007,10:04)
Quote (Rev. BigDumbChimp @ July 04 2007,09:57)
Quote (IanBrown_101 @ July 03 2007,20:20)
 
Quote (J-Dog @ July 03 2007,20:13)

Deep Fried Mars Bars??!!??
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Yep. Nothing says "Welcome to Scotland" like a snack that can cause you to have multiple heart attacks. They also do  deep fried pizza and deep fried haggis.

Addendum. A mars bar here is a Milky Way over across the pond, for those who don't know.

< Linky. >
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Interesting. Scotland sounds a lot like places here in the south eastern US.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


< There's a very good reason for that. >
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


I happen to be one of them.
Posted by: Arden Chatfield on July 04 2007,11:01

Quote (Rev. BigDumbChimp @ July 04 2007,10:58)
Quote (Arden Chatfield @ July 04 2007,10:04)
 
Quote (Rev. BigDumbChimp @ July 04 2007,09:57)
 
Quote (IanBrown_101 @ July 03 2007,20:20)
   
Quote (J-Dog @ July 03 2007,20:13)

Deep Fried Mars Bars??!!??
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Yep. Nothing says "Welcome to Scotland" like a snack that can cause you to have multiple heart attacks. They also do  deep fried pizza and deep fried haggis.

Addendum. A mars bar here is a Milky Way over across the pond, for those who don't know.

< Linky. >
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Interesting. Scotland sounds a lot like places here in the south eastern US.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


< There's a very good reason for that. >
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


I happen to be one of them.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


QED.

This also explains why the two places in the world where Ken Ham does best are the American South and Northern Ireland.
Posted by: IanBrown_101 on July 04 2007,11:08

Quote (Stephen Elliott @ July 04 2007,10:32)
Quote (Arden Chatfield @ July 04 2007,10:04)
Quote (Rev. BigDumbChimp @ July 04 2007,09:57)
 
Quote (IanBrown_101 @ July 03 2007,20:20)
 
Quote (J-Dog @ July 03 2007,20:13)

Deep Fried Mars Bars??!!??
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Yep. Nothing says "Welcome to Scotland" like a snack that can cause you to have multiple heart attacks. They also do  deep fried pizza and deep fried haggis.

Addendum. A mars bar here is a Milky Way over across the pond, for those who don't know.

< Linky. >
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Interesting. Scotland sounds a lot like places here in the south eastern US.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


< There's a very good reason for that. >
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Then again. I do believe that the people now known as Scots originally came from Ireland.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


The Irish came over and took Scotland from the original people there and the Welsh took england, then left as everybody else invaded as well.
Posted by: Arden Chatfield on July 04 2007,11:12

Also, the people who were originally in Lowland Scotland were actually most closely related to the Welsh.

Then of course there were the Norse Invasions of northeast England.

The history of all the different invasions of Britain is amazingly complex.
Posted by: Stephen Elliott on July 04 2007,11:44

Quote (IanBrown_101 @ July 04 2007,11:08)
The Irish came over and took Scotland from the original people there and the Welsh took england, then left as everybody else invaded as well.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Then the Romans followed by Vikings and related people and then the Normans. I guess the English are a right mixed race. Cool.

I prefer to be a mongrel than a pure-breed.
Posted by: Louis on July 04 2007,11:50

LOL The Welsh took England. Oh REALLY! I'll grant you the CELTS etc took England, but the WELSH?

Bunch of degenerate short, dirty, wiry haired bastards with too much of a penchant for close harmony singing, leeks, exaggerating the talents of mediocre rugby players, and acts involving sheep that modesty forbids me from mentioning, for my liking. "Never trust a Welshman" said my Nan on her deathbed, and she was right. One murdered her. Twats and wankers to a man, the lot of them.*

Mind you that cheese on toast thing and Kathryn Jenkins are alright.**

Louis

* Almost none of this paragraph is actually true at all.

** On the other hand all of this one is true. Just goes to show eh?
Posted by: Arden Chatfield on July 04 2007,11:54

Quote (Louis @ July 04 2007,11:50)
LOL The Welsh took England. Oh REALLY! I'll grant you the CELTS etc took England, but the WELSH?

Bunch of degenerate short, dirty, wiry haired bastards with too much of a penchant for close harmony singing, leeks, exaggerating the talents of mediocre rugby players, and acts involving sheep that modesty forbids me from mentioning, for my liking. "Never trust a Welshman" said my Nan on her deathbed, and she was right. One murdered her. Twats and wankers to a man, the lot of them.*
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


It's the stovepipe hats that are to blame.

Mind you, Terry Jones seems alright:


Posted by: "Rev Dr" Lenny Flank on July 04 2007,11:54

Quote (Stephen Elliott @ July 04 2007,11:44)
Then the Romans followed by Vikings and related people and then the Normans.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


A note:  The Normans were themselves desended from Vikings who were "invited" to settle northern France to protect the French from raids by other Vikings.
Posted by: deejay on July 04 2007,16:45

It's a good day for Brats steamed in beer, then pan grilled, and topped with caramelized onions.  Unfortunately, this apartment dweller doesn't have an outdoor grill.  I hope others on this board got the charcoal or, even better, wood chips, fired up today.
Posted by: IanBrown_101 on July 04 2007,16:50

Quote (Stephen Elliott @ July 04 2007,11:44)
Quote (IanBrown_101 @ July 04 2007,11:08)
The Irish came over and took Scotland from the original people there and the Welsh took england, then left as everybody else invaded as well.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Then the Romans followed by Vikings and related people and then the Normans. I guess the English are a right mixed race. Cool.

I prefer to be a mongrel than a pure-breed.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


You missed out the Angles and Saxons from what is now Germany, the Netherlands, etc.

Between Rome and Viking invasions, by the way.
Posted by: Rev. BigDumbChimp on July 04 2007,16:50

Spicy Fennel Italian Sausage

Stuffed 'em last night. Heading over to a friends for a cookout in about 30. Cook down some peppers and onions, some homemade tomato sauce, nice roll maybe some provalone and voila.... Sausage sandwich.



< Sausages >
Posted by: Kristine on July 04 2007,19:58

Quote (deejay @ July 04 2007,15:45)
It's a good day for Brats steamed in beer, then pan grilled, and topped with caramelized onions.  Unfortunately, this apartment dweller doesn't have an outdoor grill.  I hope others on this board got the charcoal or, even better, wood chips, fired up today.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


We made veggie dogs. *Ducks*

Okay, I'm not as kewl as Rev. Chimpy! But I gotta save room for the tequila and beer.
Posted by: carlsonjok on July 04 2007,23:17

Quote (Kristine @ July 04 2007,19:58)
We made veggie dogs. *Ducks*

Okay, I'm not as kewl as Rev. Chimpy! But I gotta save room for the tequila and beer.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Veggie dogs and then tequila? Are you some kind of furriner? Because that is un-American, especially on this the most American of holidays.

Now if you want a good hot dog, try < these. >  They generally can't be found in groceries outside Upstate NY, but you can get them shipped.  $5.49 is expensive for a pack of hot dogs, and that is before shipping.  But, they are so worth it.  Best hot dogs evah!!

I had strip steaks with a cumin rub and garlic-cilantro sauce, spinach salad, and Boulevard Bully Porter.
Posted by: Stephen Elliott on July 05 2007,02:36

Quote (IanBrown_101 @ July 04 2007,16:50)
Quote (Stephen Elliott @ July 04 2007,11:44)
 
Quote (IanBrown_101 @ July 04 2007,11:08)
The Irish came over and took Scotland from the original people there and the Welsh took england, then left as everybody else invaded as well.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Then the Romans followed by Vikings and related people and then the Normans. I guess the English are a right mixed race. Cool.

I prefer to be a mongrel than a pure-breed.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


You missed out the Angles and Saxons from what is now Germany, the Netherlands, etc.

Between Rome and Viking invasions, by the way.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


So I did TY.
YeeeHaaaa! Even more of a mongrel than I claimed to be.

(I would guess that there is a high chance that even more mongrelness is involved)

Quote ("Rev Dr" Lenny Flank @ July 04 2007,16:50)





Quote (Stephen Elliott @ July 04 2007 @ 11:44)

Then the Romans followed by Vikings and related people and then the Normans.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------



A note:  The Normans were themselves desended from Vikings who were "invited" to settle northern France to protect the French from raids by other Vikings.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------



True. But I doubt that the Normans in 1066 where identical to the people that originally settled. I am ASSUMING that mixed marriages occured.

I guess that I am also somehow related to Gauls.
Posted by: deejay on July 05 2007,14:52

Quote (Kristine @ July 04 2007,19:58)
Quote (deejay @ July 04 2007,15:45)
It's a good day for Brats steamed in beer, then pan grilled, and topped with caramelized onions.  Unfortunately, this apartment dweller doesn't have an outdoor grill.  I hope others on this board got the charcoal or, even better, wood chips, fired up today.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


We made veggie dogs. *Ducks*

Okay, I'm not as kewl as Rev. Chimpy! But I gotta save room for the tequila and beer.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Hi Kristine-

I didn't mention meat specifically in the original post, because you can stay vegetarian and still have a lot of fun with a grill.  Branch out from those veggie dogs when you feel inspired.  

Chimpy-

Great post.  Seeing your toys in action has given me lots of ideas for the wedding registry.
Posted by: Rev. BigDumbChimp on July 05 2007,15:20

Quote (deejay @ July 05 2007,14:52)
Quote (Kristine @ July 04 2007,19:58)
 
Quote (deejay @ July 04 2007,15:45)
It's a good day for Brats steamed in beer, then pan grilled, and topped with caramelized onions.  Unfortunately, this apartment dweller doesn't have an outdoor grill.  I hope others on this board got the charcoal or, even better, wood chips, fired up today.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


We made veggie dogs. *Ducks*

Okay, I'm not as kewl as Rev. Chimpy! But I gotta save room for the tequila and beer.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Hi Kristine-

I didn't mention meat specifically in the original post, because you can stay vegetarian and still have a lot of fun with a grill.  Branch out from those veggie dogs when you feel inspired.  

Chimpy-

Great post.  Seeing your toys in action has given me lots of ideas for the wedding registry.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Cool. More upcoming.
Posted by: Kristine on July 06 2007,22:44

Quote (carlsonjok @ July 04 2007,22:17)
 
Quote (Kristine @ July 04 2007,19:58)
We made veggie dogs. *Ducks*

Okay, I'm not as kewl as Rev. Chimpy! But I gotta save room for the tequila and beer.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Veggie dogs and then tequila? Are you some kind of furriner? Because that is un-American, especially on this the most American of holidays.

Now if you want a good hot dog, try < these. >  They generally can't be found in groceries outside Upstate NY, but you can get them shipped.  $5.49 is expensive for a pack of hot dogs, and that is before shipping.  But, they are so worth it.  Best hot dogs evah!!

I had strip steaks with a cumin rub and garlic-cilantro sauce, spinach salad, and Boulevard Bully Porter.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Doncha know? I'm from Mars. :) John is from Venus. He bought the veggie dogs.

He's not into much meat so when I buy brats and kielbasa (our local grocer makes his own - mmmmmm) they're all for me!

I gotta try me some of those red pop open hot doggies. Thx!
Posted by: J-Dog on July 09 2007,08:44

Quote (Kristine @ July 06 2007,22:44)
Quote (carlsonjok @ July 04 2007,22:17)
 
Quote (Kristine @ July 04 2007,19:58)
We made veggie dogs. *Ducks*

Okay, I'm not as kewl as Rev. Chimpy! But I gotta save room for the tequila and beer.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Veggie dogs and then tequila? Are you some kind of furriner? Because that is un-American, especially on this the most American of holidays.

Now if you want a good hot dog, try < these. >  They generally can't be found in groceries outside Upstate NY, but you can get them shipped.  $5.49 is expensive for a pack of hot dogs, and that is before shipping.  But, they are so worth it.  Best hot dogs evah!!

I had strip steaks with a cumin rub and garlic-cilantro sauce, spinach salad, and Boulevard Bully Porter.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Doncha know? I'm from Mars. :) John is from Venus. He bought the veggie dogs.

He's not into much meat so when I buy brats and kielbasa (our local grocer makes his own - mmmmmm) they're all for me!

I gotta try me some of those red pop open hot doggies. Thx!
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Kristine - Are you sure that dogs are vegitarians?

(See, cuz you said "veggie dogs"...haha)   Oh, never mind.  I hope everybody had fun though!
Posted by: Kristine on July 09 2007,19:46

The tequila beer had a good time. ;)
Posted by: Rev. BigDumbChimp on July 10 2007,09:54

< Maple Cured Hickory Smoked bacon >


Posted by: Richardthughes on July 10 2007,09:57

Bah you lot are rubbish. You need some English food. :angry:


How about "twice burned then boiled unspiced mystery meat?"


*smacks lips*
Posted by: Arden Chatfield on July 10 2007,10:04

In case any of you find yourselves in LA (visiting Larry Fafarman?), < this restaurant > rawks like nothing has rawked before.

Nothing hot and spicy, but their lemon-garlic sauce is amazing, their fried plantains are incredible, AND most of the entrees are under $9.00. I wish they'd open one of these in the Bay Area.

 

---------------------QUOTE-------------------
Bah you lot are rubbish. You need some English food.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------



You mean like < this? >


Posted by: Richardthughes on July 10 2007,10:07

You're making me hungry!



Posted by: carlsonjok on July 10 2007,10:16

Quote (Richardthughes @ July 10 2007,09:57)
Bah you lot are rubbish. You need some English food. :angry:

How about "twice burned then boiled unspiced mystery meat?"

*smacks lips*
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Reminds me of the old joke that in heaven the police are English, the engineers are German, and the cooks are French.  In hell, the police are German, the engineers are French, and the cooks are English.
Posted by: Richardthughes on July 10 2007,10:25

Heaven: Where cooks are French, mechanics are German, police are English, lovers are Italian and everything is organized by the Swiss.    

Hell: Where cooks are English, mechanics are French, police are Germans, lovers are Swiss and everything is organized by the Italians.


Are the Swiss really that bad in the sack? Toblerone, anyone?
Posted by: Rev. BigDumbChimp on July 10 2007,10:38

Quote (Richardthughes @ July 10 2007,10:25)
Heaven: Where cooks are French, mechanics are German, police are English, lovers are Italian and everything is organized by the Swiss.    

Hell: Where cooks are English, mechanics are French, police are Germans, lovers are Swiss and everything is organized by the Italians.


Are the Swiss really that bad in the sack? Toblerone, anyone?
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Probably has something to do with not wanting to commit to one side......
Posted by: J-Dog on July 10 2007,10:41

Quote (Richardthughes @ July 10 2007,10:25)
Heaven: Where cooks are French, mechanics are German, police are English, lovers are Italian and everything is organized by the Swiss.    

Hell: Where cooks are English, mechanics are French, police are Germans, lovers are Swiss and everything is organized by the Italians.


Are the Swiss really that bad in the sack? Toblerone, anyone?
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


I thought it was the Damned Dutch we had to watch out for...

< >
Posted by: stevestory on July 10 2007,14:00

Yesterday's lunch: shredded beef fajita burrito from Chipotle Mexican Grill. verdict: though it was incompetently wrapped and come apart immediately, the ingredients were fresh and tasty, and the hot salsa was actually hot. Yummy.

today's breakfast: Everything bagel with onion and chive cream cheese from Bruegger's. mediocre and room temp.

Lunch: Red Baron pizza and a few Miller Lites. Waiting for this intense thunderstorm to pass so I can go get some coffee (Probably Open Eye cafe) and then some decent vittles from Harris Teeter.
Posted by: "Rev Dr" Lenny Flank on July 10 2007,17:39

Breakfast:  Beer.


Lunch.  Beer.


Dinner:  Beer.  And half a block of cheddar cheese.



:)
Posted by: Louis on July 11 2007,02:47

No no no no no NO!

You're piffling stereotypes of what English food consists of are ludicrous. I might take abuse from the French, but from a nation of people who think that Bakelite is a cheese, I think not.

For example, until last year, < the best restaurant in the world > was in England. We have more Michelin starred restaurants than anywhere except Paris. Sorry boys, we learned! We also have orthodontists now too.

However, substitute kebab for half a block of cheddar cheese in Lenny's diet plan and you have a pretty accurate description of my twenties.

Louis
Posted by: Rev. BigDumbChimp on July 11 2007,06:43

Quote (Louis @ July 11 2007,02:47)
No no no no no NO!

You're piffling stereotypes of what English food consists of are ludicrous. I might take abuse from the French, but from a nation of people who think that Bakelite is a cheese, I think not.

For example, until last year, < the best restaurant in the world > was in England. We have more Michelin starred restaurants than anywhere except Paris. Sorry boys, we learned! We also have orthodontists now too.

However, substitute kebab for half a block of cheddar cheese in Lenny's diet plan and you have a pretty accurate description of my twenties.

Louis
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


I'll have to agree with Louis. While the UK in general has a bad reputation it has elevated it's higher cuisine to the standards the rest of the culinary world is at or shoots for. England's close neighbor Ireland is actually quite the hotspot for cuisine because of the vast variety and proximity of fresh local ingredients that are available.



/removes nose from louis' posterior
Posted by: Arden Chatfield on July 11 2007,09:26

Quote (Louis @ July 11 2007,02:47)
For example, until last year, < the best restaurant in the world > was in England. We have more Michelin starred restaurants than anywhere except Paris. Sorry boys, we learned! We also have orthodontists now too.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Did you guys fix that whole indoor plumbing/central heating thing, as well?
Posted by: carlsonjok on July 11 2007,09:43

Quote (Louis @ July 11 2007,02:47)
We also have orthodontists now too.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


I did a quick google and, by golly,you are right.  I am a little skeptical of their marketing strategy, though.


Posted by: Richardthughes on July 11 2007,09:49

Quote (stevestory @ July 10 2007,14:00)
Yesterday's lunch: shredded beef fajita burrito from Chipotle Mexican Grill. verdict: though it was incompetently wrapped and come apart immediately, the ingredients were fresh and tasty, and the hot salsa was actually hot. Yummy.

today's breakfast: Everything bagel with onion and chive cream cheese from Bruegger's. mediocre and room temp.

Lunch: Red Baron pizza and a few Miller Lites. Waiting for this intense thunderstorm to pass so I can go get some coffee (Probably Open Eye cafe) and then some decent vittles from Harris Teeter.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


I'm having lifestyle envy of Sternberger Story!
Posted by: stevestory on July 11 2007,09:54

God help me if that nickname catches on.

Today's breakfast:



Lunch: whatever the Sub Special is at Harris Teeter today. I think it's the Philly Cheese Steak. And then a cappuccino at Caribou.
Posted by: carlsonjok on July 11 2007,10:03

Quote (stevestory @ July 11 2007,09:54)
God help me if that nickname catches on.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


With beer for breakfast, I have to wonder if a better nickname for you would be "My name is" Steve.
Posted by: stevestory on July 11 2007,10:08

LOL. no. I've cut way back. I seldom have more than 3-4 drinks a day now.
Posted by: Arden Chatfield on July 11 2007,10:10

Quote (Richardthughes @ July 11 2007,09:49)
 
Quote (stevestory @ July 10 2007,14:00)
Yesterday's lunch: shredded beef fajita burrito from Chipotle Mexican Grill. verdict: though it was incompetently wrapped and come apart immediately, the ingredients were fresh and tasty, and the hot salsa was actually hot. Yummy.

today's breakfast: Everything bagel with onion and chive cream cheese from Bruegger's. mediocre and room temp.

Lunch: Red Baron pizza and a few Miller Lites. Waiting for this intense thunderstorm to pass so I can go get some coffee (Probably Open Eye cafe) and then some decent vittles from Harris Teeter.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


I'm having lifestyle envy of Sternberger Story!
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Mmmmmmm.... Sternbergers....


Posted by: deejay on July 11 2007,10:12

A buddy of mine is a bartender at dive bar in the town in Montana where I used to live.  He worked day shifts on Thursdays and Fridays, and when the regulars filed in at 10AM for their first beers, they'd give their orders as "A can of coffee, please."
Posted by: Stephen Elliott on July 11 2007,10:15

Quote (Louis @ July 11 2007,02:47)
No no no no no NO!

You're piffling stereotypes of what English food consists of are ludicrous. I might take abuse from the French, but from a nation of people who think that Bakelite is a cheese, I think not.

For example, until last year, < the best restaurant in the world > was in England. We have more Michelin starred restaurants than anywhere except Paris. Sorry boys, we learned! We also have orthodontists now too.

However, substitute kebab for half a block of cheddar cheese in Lenny's diet plan and you have a pretty accurate description of my twenties.

Louis
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


There is truth in what you claim.
What is "English" food anyway? Traditional English or average restaurant?
I have had family visiting recently and spent the last 2 days wandering around Windsor (is anywhere significantly more English?). In Windsor there are more restaurants than you can shake a stick at. Yet I didn't see 1 "English" one. Mexican, Indian, Chinese, Japanese. Lebanese, Morocan, Thai etc etc etc are all available and mostly pretty damned good. For traditional English food you need to go to a pub and the food is generally pretty good.
To have our cuisine criticised by people from a nation that eats cakes for breakfast, puts sugar in damn near everything and produce the most tasteless apples I have ever encountered (but they looked nice) is a tad harsh.

EDIT: Sod orthodontists! Character teeth FTW! Nature>nurture.
Posted by: carlsonjok on July 11 2007,10:30

Quote (Stephen Elliott @ July 11 2007,10:15)
To have our cuisine criticised by people from a nation that eats cakes for breakfast, puts sugar in damn near everything and produce the most tasteless apples I have ever encountered (but they looked nice) is a tad harsh.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Interestingly, my wife and I were watching a show about breakfast on the Food Network (porn for the middle aged set) and they were saying that the only traditional breakfast food that is truly American is < grits. >
Posted by: argystokes on July 11 2007,10:39

Recently got back from Newport, Oregon, where I visited the Rogue Brewery. Got myself a nice "kobe" beef burger with a Rogue American Amber. The burger was made of cows fed exclusively on American Amber. Delicious.
Posted by: Stephen Elliott on July 11 2007,10:44

Quote (carlsonjok @ July 11 2007,10:30)
     
Quote (Stephen Elliott @ July 11 2007,10:15)
To have our cuisine criticised by people from a nation that eats cakes for breakfast, puts sugar in damn near everything and produce the most tasteless apples I have ever encountered (but they looked nice) is a tad harsh.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Interestingly, my wife and I were watching a show about breakfast on the Food Network (porn for the middle aged set) and they were saying that the only traditional breakfast food that is truly American is < grits. >
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Cue... The Sloop John B?
Posted by: Louis on July 11 2007,10:55

Quote (Arden Chatfield @ July 11 2007,15:26)
Quote (Louis @ July 11 2007,02:47)
For example, until last year, < the best restaurant in the world > was in England. We have more Michelin starred restaurants than anywhere except Paris. Sorry boys, we learned! We also have orthodontists now too.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Did you guys fix that whole indoor plumbing/central heating thing, as well?
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


"You mean you crap out of the window?"

"Yes"

"Good. I hate them dirty indoor things"

Louis
Posted by: Louis on July 11 2007,11:06

Steve,

Traditional English food?

Pork in cider...stews....broths....steak and ale pie...sprats....lamb and mint...roast chicken with stuffing.....bacon sandwiches, hell ALL sandwiches....eccles cakes....cheddar....STILTON!!!!!....beer, real beer, not making love in a canoe beer....pork scratchings...curry(we stole India therefore Indian cuisine is ours)...fish and chips, it doesn't suck so there, add mushy peas and gravy....roast beef, yorkshire pudding, mustard GRAVY, mashed potatoes..........

I could go on and on and on. You can get GREAT English food in many pubs, especially in the new Gastro Pubs which are springing up across the nation. I reckon even in Windsor we could find English food (although I'll grant you know the place better than I ;-) )

Celebrate our English fodder (and this from a Demi-Greek!)

Louis
Posted by: Rev. BigDumbChimp on July 11 2007,11:19

Quote (carlsonjok @ July 11 2007,10:30)
Quote (Stephen Elliott @ July 11 2007,10:15)
To have our cuisine criticised by people from a nation that eats cakes for breakfast, puts sugar in damn near everything and produce the most tasteless apples I have ever encountered (but they looked nice) is a tad harsh.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Interestingly, my wife and I were watching a show about breakfast on the Food Network (porn for the middle aged set) and they were saying that the only traditional breakfast food that is truly American is < grits. >
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


I'll start taking virtual punches if anyone criticizes grits.....
Posted by: carlsonjok on July 11 2007,11:26

Quote (Rev. BigDumbChimp @ July 11 2007,11:19)
Quote (carlsonjok @ July 11 2007,10:30)
 
Quote (Stephen Elliott @ July 11 2007,10:15)
To have our cuisine criticised by people from a nation that eats cakes for breakfast, puts sugar in damn near everything and produce the most tasteless apples I have ever encountered (but they looked nice) is a tad harsh.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Interestingly, my wife and I were watching a show about breakfast on the Food Network (porn for the middle aged set) and they were saying that the only traditional breakfast food that is truly American is < grits. >
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


I'll start taking virtual punches if anyone criticizes grits.....
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


I love grits.  I usually eat them with liberal amounts of butter and black pepper.  But, I am willing to bet the Right Reverend has a good recipe or two for grits.

However, let me state up front that I am going to write you off as a complete food geek if you actually prepare your own hominy.  Not that my opinion means anything, but just saying........
Posted by: Arden Chatfield on July 11 2007,11:34

Quote (carlsonjok @ July 11 2007,11:26)
   
Quote (Rev. BigDumbChimp @ July 11 2007,11:19)
     
Quote (carlsonjok @ July 11 2007,10:30)
       
Quote (Stephen Elliott @ July 11 2007,10:15)
To have our cuisine criticised by people from a nation that eats cakes for breakfast, puts sugar in damn near everything and produce the most tasteless apples I have ever encountered (but they looked nice) is a tad harsh.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Interestingly, my wife and I were watching a show about breakfast on the Food Network (porn for the middle aged set) and they were saying that the only traditional breakfast food that is truly American is < grits. >
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


I'll start taking virtual punches if anyone criticizes grits.....
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


I love grits.  I usually eat them with liberal amounts of butter and black pepper.  But, I am willing to bet the Right Reverend has a good recipe or two for grits.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Grits are delicious if they're prepared with the right consistency. (They're easy to screw up.) I prefer them with butter and garlic salt.

   

---------------------QUOTE-------------------

However, let me state up front that I am going to write you off as a complete food geek if you actually prepare your own hominy.  Not that my opinion means anything, but just saying........
---------------------QUOTE-------------------



I have a friend who grows his own heirloom corn and uses it to make his own hominy. Soaks it in lye to get the hulls off and everything. It makes awesome pozole, BTW.

So why didn't Louis mention chip butties as one of the proud acheivements of English cuisine? Is he trying to HIDE something?  :angry:
Posted by: Rev. BigDumbChimp on July 11 2007,12:31

Quote (Arden Chatfield @ July 11 2007,11:34)
Quote (carlsonjok @ July 11 2007,11:26)
   
Quote (Rev. BigDumbChimp @ July 11 2007,11:19)
     
Quote (carlsonjok @ July 11 2007,10:30)
       
Quote (Stephen Elliott @ July 11 2007,10:15)
To have our cuisine criticised by people from a nation that eats cakes for breakfast, puts sugar in damn near everything and produce the most tasteless apples I have ever encountered (but they looked nice) is a tad harsh.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Interestingly, my wife and I were watching a show about breakfast on the Food Network (porn for the middle aged set) and they were saying that the only traditional breakfast food that is truly American is < grits. >
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


I'll start taking virtual punches if anyone criticizes grits.....
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


I love grits.  I usually eat them with liberal amounts of butter and black pepper.  But, I am willing to bet the Right Reverend has a good recipe or two for grits.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Grits are delicious if they're prepared with the right consistency. (They're easy to screw up.) I prefer them with butter and garlic salt.

   

---------------------QUOTE-------------------

However, let me state up front that I am going to write you off as a complete food geek if you actually prepare your own hominy.  Not that my opinion means anything, but just saying........
---------------------QUOTE-------------------



I have a friend who grows his own heirloom corn and uses it to make his own hominy. Soaks it in lye to get the hulls off and everything. It makes awesome pozole, BTW.

So why didn't Louis mention chip butties as one of the proud acheivements of English cuisine? Is he trying to HIDE something?  :angry:
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


I wouldn't put it past me to try it once.
Posted by: Stephen Elliott on July 11 2007,12:37

Quote (Louis @ July 11 2007,11:06)
Steve,

Traditional English food?

Pork in cider...stews....broths....steak and ale pie...sprats....lamb and mint...roast chicken with stuffing.....bacon sandwiches, hell ALL sandwiches....eccles cakes....cheddar....STILTON!!!!!....beer, real beer, not making love in a canoe beer....pork scratchings...curry(we stole India therefore Indian cuisine is ours)...fish and chips, it doesn't suck so there, add mushy peas and gravy....roast beef, yorkshire pudding, mustard GRAVY, mashed potatoes..........

I could go on and on and on. You can get GREAT English food in many pubs, especially in the new Gastro Pubs which are springing up across the nation. I reckon even in Windsor we could find English food (although I'll grant you know the place better than I ;-) )

Celebrate our English fodder (and this from a Demi-Greek!)

Louis
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Lets lay claim to Greek too. Man I love Haloumi. Fried, barbied or grilled.

Anyway. Good food is available in England and who the Hell cares where it originated from so long as it is tasty?

PS. Beer is more important than food and I know of not a single country that such a wide and varied choice as England *flies flag. sings "Land of hope and glory"*.
Posted by: Rev. BigDumbChimp on July 11 2007,12:54

Quote (Stephen Elliott @ July 11 2007,12:37)
Quote (Louis @ July 11 2007,11:06)
Steve,

Traditional English food?

Pork in cider...stews....broths....steak and ale pie...sprats....lamb and mint...roast chicken with stuffing.....bacon sandwiches, hell ALL sandwiches....eccles cakes....cheddar....STILTON!!!!!....beer, real beer, not making love in a canoe beer....pork scratchings...curry(we stole India therefore Indian cuisine is ours)...fish and chips, it doesn't suck so there, add mushy peas and gravy....roast beef, yorkshire pudding, mustard GRAVY, mashed potatoes..........

I could go on and on and on. You can get GREAT English food in many pubs, especially in the new Gastro Pubs which are springing up across the nation. I reckon even in Windsor we could find English food (although I'll grant you know the place better than I ;-) )

Celebrate our English fodder (and this from a Demi-Greek!)

Louis
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Lets lay claim to Greek too. Man I love Haloumi. Fried, barbied or grilled.

Anyway. Good food is available in England and who the Hell cares where it originated from so long as it is tasty?

PS. Beer is more important than food and I know of not a single country that such a wide and varied choice as England *flies flag. sings "Land of hope and glory"*.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


You'd be surprised at the massive amounts of styles and breweries that are in the us now. Ignore the big swill beers like miller, bud, coors etc... There is a huge craft beer industry here in the states.

Not saying more than england but more than most people think.
Posted by: Stephen Elliott on July 11 2007,13:05

Quote (Rev. BigDumbChimp @ July 11 2007,12:54)
You'd be surprised at the massive amounts of styles and breweries that are in the us now. Ignore the big swill beers like miller, bud, coors etc... There is a huge craft beer industry here in the states.

Not saying more than england but more than most people think.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Maybe, maybe not. I did have a stay in ST. Louis and was very pleasantly surprised by the quality of some micro-breweries there. IIRC it was in the French quarter but am not certain due to the said quality of beer.

I was being over-generalistic. There is plenty of crap beer over here. Just not the ones that Americans (normally) refer to as warm.

IMO. The mark of a good beer is that it tastes OK at room temperature. I am not saying it SHOULD be served at that temperature BTW.

In short. I have tasted good beer in the USA and was being fascitious (trying to sound clever).
Posted by: Louis on July 11 2007,15:28

I've drunk good American beer, but I won't admit to it....

....D'OH!

{slaps forehead}

Louis

P.S.  Chip butties come under the heading of "sandwich". As do barms, baps, butties, cobs, chaps, crusties etc etc etc
Posted by: BWE on July 11 2007,16:06

I've drunk good american beer and I prefer the shitty stuff.

However, yesterday:

Breakfast: very good cottage cheese, bacon, leek and birdseye pepper stuffed crepes. ; coffee

Lunch: avacado based wrap sandwich, I remember tomato, lettuce and cream cheese not sure of what else. ; tomato juice and lots of water because it's hot.

Dinner: bb-q shrimp with water chestnuts and scallions wrapped around them, salad with dried cranberries, feta and walnuts and fresh baked bread; 6 pack of miller lite.

Summer vacation. I love it.
Posted by: Richardthughes on July 11 2007,16:10

Quote (Arden Chatfield @ July 11 2007,10:10)
Quote (Richardthughes @ July 11 2007,09:49)
   
Quote (stevestory @ July 10 2007,14:00)
Yesterday's lunch: shredded beef fajita burrito from Chipotle Mexican Grill. verdict: though it was incompetently wrapped and come apart immediately, the ingredients were fresh and tasty, and the hot salsa was actually hot. Yummy.

today's breakfast: Everything bagel with onion and chive cream cheese from Bruegger's. mediocre and room temp.

Lunch: Red Baron pizza and a few Miller Lites. Waiting for this intense thunderstorm to pass so I can go get some coffee (Probably Open Eye cafe) and then some decent vittles from Harris Teeter.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


I'm having lifestyle envy of Sternberger Story!
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Mmmmmmm.... Sternbergers....


---------------------QUOTE-------------------


HOMER! - DT
Posted by: stevestory on July 11 2007,16:54

Food Lion has catfish for $1.19/lb at the moment. So dinner is that, fried in beer batter, and with more beer on the side. Yuengling lager, if you must know.
Posted by: "Rev Dr" Lenny Flank on July 11 2007,18:44

Quote (stevestory @ July 11 2007,16:54)
Yuengling lager, if you must know.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Dude, go for the porter.

It was my favorite beer when I lived in PA.  The reason I started brewing my own Viking Piss Porter is because I couldn't find any Yuengling here after I moved.
Posted by: Arden Chatfield on July 12 2007,13:24

I'm especially partial to < Szechuan cardboard >, myself:

 

---------------------QUOTE-------------------
Beijing Steamed Buns Include Cardboard

Thursday, July 12, 2007\(07-12) 09:00 PDT BEIJING, China (AP) --

Chopped cardboard, softened with an industrial chemical and flavored with fatty pork and powdered seasoning, is a main ingredient in batches of steamed buns sold in one Beijing neighborhood, state television said.
The report, aired late Wednesday on China Central Television, highlights the country's problems with food safety despite government efforts to improve the situation.
Countless small, often illegally run operations exist across China and make money cutting corners by using inexpensive ingredients or unsavory substitutes. They are almost impossible to regulate.
State TV's undercover investigation features the shirtless, shorts-clad maker of the buns, called baozi, explaining the contents of the product sold in Beijing's sprawling Chaoyang district.
Baozi are a common snack in China, with an outer skin made from wheat or rice flour and and a filling of sliced pork. Cooked by steaming in immense bamboo baskets, they are similar to but usually much bigger than the dumplings found on dim sum menus familiar to many Americans.
The hidden camera follows the man, whose face is not shown, into a ramshackle building where steamers are filled with the fluffy white buns, traditionally stuffed with minced pork.
The surroundings are filthy, with water puddles and piles of old furniture and cardboard on the ground.
"What's in the recipe?" the reporter asks. "Six to four," the man says.
"You mean 60 percent cardboard? What is the other 40 percent?" asks the reporter. "Fatty meat," the man replies.
The bun maker and his assistants then give a demonstration on how the product is made.
Squares of cardboard picked from the ground are first soaked to a pulp in a plastic basin of caustic soda — a chemical base commonly used in manufacturing paper and soap — then chopped into tiny morsels with a cleaver. Fatty pork and powdered seasoning are stirred in.
Soon, steaming servings of the buns appear on the screen. The reporter takes a bite.
"This baozi filling is kind of tough. Not much taste," he says. "Can other people taste the difference?"
"Most people can't. It fools the average person," the maker says. "I don't eat them myself."
The police eventually showed up and shut down the operation.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Posted by: carlsonjok on July 12 2007,13:36

Quote (Arden Chatfield @ July 12 2007,13:24)
I'm especially partial to < Szechuan cardboard >, myself:
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Arden, I found one of your old school photos:


Posted by: Richardthughes on July 12 2007,13:42

Quote (stevestory @ July 11 2007,16:54)
Food Lion has catfish for $1.19/lb at the moment. So dinner is that, fried in beer batter, and with more beer on the side. Yuengling lager, if you must know.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Yuengling is one of the better colonial brews.
Posted by: Arden Chatfield on July 12 2007,13:44

Quote (carlsonjok @ July 12 2007,13:36)
Quote (Arden Chatfield @ July 12 2007,13:24)
I'm especially partial to < Szechuan cardboard >, myself:
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Arden, I found one of your old school photos:


---------------------QUOTE-------------------


But Carlsonjok, does your cat's breath smell like tuna fish?


Posted by: Tracy P. Hamilton on July 12 2007,14:53

Quote ("Rev Dr" Lenny Flank @ July 10 2007,17:39)
Breakfast:  Beer.


Lunch.  Beer.


Dinner:  Beer.  And half a block of cheddar cheese.



:)
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


[Dinner]

1.5 cheese and chicken quesadillas with chipotles.
To drink:

brewmasters list, July 11, 2007
[      
     
       STYLE OF THE MONTH: Light Lagers, which a couple of us misremembered as Light Hyrids and responded accordingly.
       Appetizers:
       1. Eku 28.
       2. Petrus Oud Bruin.
       3. Rogue’s Charlie 1981, commemorative in honor of homebrewer Charlie Papazian.
       And the Serious stuff. Just look at what’s first up!
       4. Budweiser, in a 24-ounce can no less.
       5. Doug’s Lawn Mower Beer, a Wit, homebrew.
       6. Dennis’ Lager, homebrew.
       7. Tracy’s Cream Ale, made with a bit of corn, homebrew.
       8. Kim’s Lager, “a backwards Cream Ale,” homebrew.
       9. Doug’s “Coors With Hops”  homebrew, 7% corn.
       10. Miller Chill, cutting out the middle man at Corona bars.
       11. Sol.
       12. Yeungling Lager, in a 16-ounce can.
       13. Yeungling Lager, in a bottle, and most agreed there was a difference.
       14. Brooklyn Lager.
       15. Spaten.
       16. Peroni Nastro Assurro.
       17. Kronenbourg 1664.
       18. Palma Louca.
       19. Tecate.
       20. Dos XX Lage Especial, the green bottle.
       21. Abita 20th Anniversary Ale.
       22. Left Hand Haystack Wheat.
       23. Weihenstephaner.
       24. Cabana

Slice of sourdough bread.

That is where the record-keeping ends.  Alas, Yuengling Porter is not widely available.  The brewer named Doug got into homebrewing because of Yuengling Porter.
Posted by: stevestory on July 12 2007,17:57

Continuing the $1.20/lb catfish theme, tonight's dish:

< Louisiana Catfish >
Posted by: stevestory on July 12 2007,18:17

i only had Tecate once, but i thought it was foul. What do other people think?
Posted by: BWE on July 12 2007,18:24

Quote (stevestory @ July 12 2007,18:17)
i only had Tecate once, but i thought it was foul. What do other people think?
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Where most people judge things on a scale of, say, 1-10 with one being bad and 10 being wonderful, I call that a vertical palette. Mine is more horizontal with a variety of different 5's.

Tecate though, is akin to bud, coors, heineken, labatts, hamms, oly, sam adams, basically very clear watery beer. I like it.
Posted by: carlsonjok on July 12 2007,18:51

Quote (stevestory @ July 12 2007,18:17)
i only had Tecate once, but i thought it was foul. What do other people think?
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


My favorite Mexican restaurant (note: not a chain, Steve) serves it ice cold with salt and lime pulp on the rim of the glass and, while some may consider that heresy(*), I think it tastes great.  I will occasionally drink it at home straight up, but again it has to be ice cold.  My personal preference for Mexican beers is < Indio >, but it is not available in the States as far as I can tell.  :(

(*)  A former coworker, who is an accomplished homebrewer, called it a white trash margarita.  YMMV.
Posted by: Tracy P. Hamilton on July 12 2007,21:33

Quote (Arden Chatfield @ July 12 2007,13:24)
I'm especially partial to < Szechuan cardboard >, myself:

   

---------------------QUOTE-------------------
Beijing Steamed Buns Include Cardboard

Thursday, July 12, 2007\(07-12) 09:00 PDT BEIJING, China (AP) --

Chopped cardboard, softened with an industrial chemical and flavored with fatty pork and powdered seasoning, is a main ingredient in batches of steamed buns sold in one Beijing neighborhood, state television said.
The report, aired late Wednesday on China Central Television, highlights the country's problems with food safety despite government efforts to improve the situation.
Countless small, often illegally run operations exist across China and make money cutting corners by using inexpensive ingredients or unsavory substitutes. They are almost impossible to regulate.
State TV's undercover investigation features the shirtless, shorts-clad maker of the buns, called baozi, explaining the contents of the product sold in Beijing's sprawling Chaoyang district.
Baozi are a common snack in China, with an outer skin made from wheat or rice flour and and a filling of sliced pork. Cooked by steaming in immense bamboo baskets, they are similar to but usually much bigger than the dumplings found on dim sum menus familiar to many Americans.
The hidden camera follows the man, whose face is not shown, into a ramshackle building where steamers are filled with the fluffy white buns, traditionally stuffed with minced pork.
The surroundings are filthy, with water puddles and piles of old furniture and cardboard on the ground.
"What's in the recipe?" the reporter asks. "Six to four," the man says.
"You mean 60 percent cardboard? What is the other 40 percent?" asks the reporter. "Fatty meat," the man replies.
The bun maker and his assistants then give a demonstration on how the product is made.
Squares of cardboard picked from the ground are first soaked to a pulp in a plastic basin of caustic soda — a chemical base commonly used in manufacturing paper and soap — then chopped into tiny morsels with a cleaver. Fatty pork and powdered seasoning are stirred in.
Soon, steaming servings of the buns appear on the screen. The reporter takes a bite.
"This baozi filling is kind of tough. Not much taste," he says. "Can other people taste the difference?"
"Most people can't. It fools the average person," the maker says. "I don't eat them myself."
The police eventually showed up and shut down the operation.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


---------------------QUOTE-------------------


The guy must have been Disembowel-Meself-Honorably Dibhala, the Agatean counterpart to Cut-My-Own Throat Dibbler of Ankh-Morpork.
Posted by: Tracy P. Hamilton on July 12 2007,21:35

Quote (stevestory @ July 12 2007,18:17)
i only had Tecate once, but i thought it was foul. What do other people think?
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


I find all of the Mexican light lagers the same.  The amber lagers like Negro Modelo and perhaps Dos Equis ore decent.
Posted by: Rev. BigDumbChimp on July 13 2007,22:48

Sipping on some of this right now.

< Noah's Mill Bourbon >
Posted by: stevestory on July 14 2007,17:13

tonight: catfish fried in a beer batter with a tsp of Szeged fish rub mixed in, and some Michelob Ultra.
Posted by: Albatrossity2 on July 14 2007,17:50

Quote (stevestory @ July 14 2007,17:13)
tonight: catfish fried in a beer batter with a tsp of Szeged fish rub mixed in, and some Michelob Ultra.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


While hoping that an approaching < thunder- and hailstorm > doesn't hit Manhattan, I thought I'd try < this chicken mole recipe >. Served with < this IPA > (which is delicious, BTW). I'll report back on the chicken/mole recipe after all the critics have weighed in...
Posted by: stevestory on July 14 2007,17:58

chicken mole is pretty bangin'.
Posted by: Albatrossity2 on July 14 2007,18:25

Quote (stevestory @ July 14 2007,17:58)
chicken mole is pretty bangin'.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


We'll certainly find out!

And, praise FSM, the thunderstorm slid off to the east and missed us. It is a very interesting sky at the moment, however.
Posted by: carlsonjok on July 14 2007,18:50

Quote (Albatrossity2 @ July 14 2007,17:50)
While hoping that an approaching < thunder- and hailstorm > doesn't hit Manhattan,
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Better you than me, Bubba.  I've done had it with the rain. After the drought last year, I am trying to be thankful that we are getting rain, but it is getting a bit ridiculous.  Last year, with the drought, I mowed my lawn 6 times the entire year.  This year, I am mowing it every 4 days like clock work.
 

---------------------QUOTE-------------------
I thought I'd try < this chicken mole recipe >. Served with < this IPA > (which is delicious, BTW). I'll report back on the chicken/mole recipe after all the critics have weighed in...
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


That is an odd recipe.  Raisins?  I've never seen that before.  And no peppers?  Strange.  Our < favorite mole recipe >is actually on the  South Beach Diet.  I've tried it with the jarred mole that you can find at Hispanic groceries, but the South Beach is better.

EDIT: Was watching Guy's Big Bite on the Food Network (porn for the over 40 set) and < this recipe > looks intriguing.  Will probably try it next weekend.
Posted by: Rev. BigDumbChimp on July 14 2007,21:05

Quote (Albatrossity2 @ July 14 2007,17:50)
Quote (stevestory @ July 14 2007,17:13)
tonight: catfish fried in a beer batter with a tsp of Szeged fish rub mixed in, and some Michelob Ultra.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


While hoping that an approaching < thunder- and hailstorm > doesn't hit Manhattan, I thought I'd try < this chicken mole recipe >. Served with < this IPA > (which is delicious, BTW). I'll report back on the chicken/mole recipe after all the critics have weighed in...
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Oh yeah. The Great Divide Brewery is top notch. That IPA is very good and their < Hercules Double IPA > is fantastic.

The Yeti Imperial Stout might be one of my favorite Imperial Stouts I've tried recently.
Posted by: Rev. BigDumbChimp on July 14 2007,21:09

Quote (carlsonjok @ July 14 2007,18:50)
 
Quote (Albatrossity2 @ July 14 2007,17:50)
While hoping that an approaching < thunder- and hailstorm > doesn't hit Manhattan,
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Better you than me, Bubba.  I've done had it with the rain. After the drought last year, I am trying to be thankful that we are getting rain, but it is getting a bit ridiculous.  Last year, with the drought, I mowed my lawn 6 times the entire year.  This year, I am mowing it every 4 days like clock work.
     

---------------------QUOTE-------------------
I thought I'd try < this chicken mole recipe >. Served with < this IPA > (which is delicious, BTW). I'll report back on the chicken/mole recipe after all the critics have weighed in...
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


That is an odd recipe.  Raisins?  I've never seen that before.  And no peppers?  Strange.  Our < favorite mole recipe >is actually on the  South Beach Diet.  I've tried it with the jarred mole that you can find at Hispanic groceries, but the South Beach is better.

EDIT: Was watching Guy's Big Bite on the Food Network (porn for the over 40 set) and < this recipe > looks intriguing.  Will probably try it next weekend.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Whoa. That looks great. Any excuse I can find to make ribs I'll take.

I bet < this > would go great with those

---edit---

That recipe looks amazing. I think I've found a pork and whiskey post.
Posted by: carlsonjok on July 15 2007,20:24

Quote (Rev. BigDumbChimp @ July 14 2007,21:09)
 
Quote (carlsonjok @ July 14 2007,18:50)
   EDIT: Was watching Guy's Big Bite on the Food Network (porn for the over 40 set) and < this recipe > looks intriguing.  Will probably try it next weekend.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Whoa. That looks great. Any excuse I can find to make ribs I'll take.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


So, I broke down and made the ribs tonight.  The turned out good, although next time I will probably add dry mustard to the rub and forgo the bottled mustard which made it hard to spread the rub evenly.  I would also cut down on the soy sauce and increase the hot sauce.
 

---------------------QUOTE-------------------

I bet < this > would go great with those
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


I served it with < Lakewood Vineyards Vignoles. >  It was sweet with a touch of spice to it.  A nice complement to the flavor of the ribs.
Posted by: Rev. BigDumbChimp on July 15 2007,23:14

Quote (carlsonjok @ July 15 2007,20:24)
Quote (Rev. BigDumbChimp @ July 14 2007,21:09)
   
Quote (carlsonjok @ July 14 2007,18:50)
   EDIT: Was watching Guy's Big Bite on the Food Network (porn for the over 40 set) and < this recipe > looks intriguing.  Will probably try it next weekend.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Whoa. That looks great. Any excuse I can find to make ribs I'll take.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


So, I broke down and made the ribs tonight.  The turned out good, although next time I will probably add dry mustard to the rub and forgo the bottled mustard which made it hard to spread the rub evenly.  I would also cut down on the soy sauce and increase the hot sauce.
 

---------------------QUOTE-------------------

I bet < this > would go great with those
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


I served it with < Lakewood Vineyards Vignoles. >  It was sweet with a touch of spice to it.  A nice complement to the flavor of the ribs.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Funny, I made the ribs tonight as well. I'm not sure if the cherrys I used were weak or what but I was expecting a little more cherry flavor.

All in all pretty damn good though.
Posted by: Albatrossity2 on July 16 2007,09:23

Quote (carlsonjok @ July 14 2007,18:50)
That is an odd recipe.  Raisins?  I've never seen that before.  And no peppers?  Strange.  Our < favorite mole recipe >is actually on the  South Beach Diet.  I've tried it with the jarred mole that you can find at Hispanic groceries, but the South Beach is better.


---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Yeah, I added a serrano pepper to the mix since I was also perplexed by the lack of heat potential in this dish. I'm not looking for the fire-breathing diet that Louis and Steve et al. seem to favor, but Mexican food should have some pepper ingredients!

I can report that it was pretty good, and, like all moles, even better the second day as leftovers. It wasn't the best mole I ever had, but it was far from the worst. Sometime I'll try that South Beach recipe as well, and see how it compares.
Posted by: "Rev Dr" Lenny Flank on July 16 2007,17:19

Quote (Albatrossity2 @ July 16 2007,09:23)
I can report that it was pretty good, and, like all moles, even better the second day as leftovers. It wasn't the best mole I ever had, but it was far from the worst.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Why are you eating subterranean rodents . . . . ?
Posted by: Albatrossity2 on July 16 2007,17:25

Quote ("Rev Dr" Lenny Flank @ July 16 2007,17:19)
Why are you eating subterranean rodents . . . . ?
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Gopher, Everett?


Posted by: Arden Chatfield on July 16 2007,18:04

Quote ("Rev Dr" Lenny Flank @ July 16 2007,17:19)
Quote (Albatrossity2 @ July 16 2007,09:23)
I can report that it was pretty good, and, like all moles, even better the second day as leftovers. It wasn't the best mole I ever had, but it was far from the worst.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Why are you eating subterranean rodents . . . . ?
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Are you here all week, Lenny?
Posted by: Arden Chatfield on July 16 2007,18:08

Quote (Albatrossity2 @ July 16 2007,17:25)
 
Quote ("Rev Dr" Lenny Flank @ July 16 2007,17:19)
Why are you eating subterranean rodents . . . . ?
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Gopher, Everett?


---------------------QUOTE-------------------


 

---------------------QUOTE-------------------

Clark: [a squirrel is loose in the house] Where is Eddie? He usually eats these goddam things.
Cousin Catherine Johnson: Not recently, Clark. He read that squirrels were high in cholesterol.

---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Posted by: Louis on July 16 2007,18:17

Quote ("Rev Dr" Lenny Flank @ July 16 2007,23:19)
Quote (Albatrossity2 @ July 16 2007,09:23)
I can report that it was pretty good, and, like all moles, even better the second day as leftovers. It wasn't the best mole I ever had, but it was far from the worst.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Why are you eating subterranean rodents . . . . ?
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Thank the FSM! I was going to ask that.

Louis

P.S. I'm joking. I know what a mole is. Although why anyone would wish to eat an undercover operative placed into an organisation to gather intelligence is beyond me.
Posted by: BWE on July 17 2007,01:56

Quote (Albatrossity2 @ July 16 2007,17:25)
Quote ("Rev Dr" Lenny Flank @ July 16 2007,17:19)
Why are you eating subterranean rodents . . . . ?
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Gopher, Everett?


---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Can I play you a song to go with the fresh rodent?

Posted by: Arden Chatfield on July 17 2007,23:46

Okay, the last time I tried to make a phaal, I didn't like the results. Too tomatoey and I didn't like the diced potatoes.

So I tackled the recipe again, hopefully to get it right this time.

I again worked off < this > recipe, since it looked simple enough for my rather shaky skill set:

       

---------------------QUOTE-------------------
Mutton Dish (Phaal)
Ingredients
1. Mutton pieces or Chicken 1/2 kg.
2. Bunch of Coriander/Cilantro. More than a handful. Well chopped.
3. 4-5 Red Chillies
4. 1 tbsp Pepper Powder.
5. Ginger-Garlic paste- 1 tbsp
6. 2 Onions
7. 1 Tomato
8. 3-4 Potatoes
9. Oil - 2 tbsp
10. Salt to taste
Method
Fry the onions for a while. Then add ginger-garlic paste and fry a little longer.
Make a paste out of Coriander, red chillies, pepper powder, tomato and fried onions (from step 1 ).
Take a wok and put in the paste and heat well. Keep stirring until paste thickens and the raw smell disappears.
Add some water, mutton or chicken pieces along with potatoes and cook for 20 minutes.
If it is mutton you will have to pressure cook for 3-4 whistles. Stir once in a while and add water if you require a little extra gravy.
Happy cooking.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------



I used chicken thighs and not mutton, of course. I used ground coriander (a lot), not cilantro. (I can't abide cilantro.) I used exactly the amount of ginger garlic paste it instructed, but only half a (yellow) onion. I didn't use any potatoes (I prefer rice), and only used about half a cup of crushed tomatoes. For the heat I used one habanero (my other one had gone bad), one jalapeño, a tablespoon of store-bought red chile paste, and a bunch of Mexican chili powder. (I didn't know how hot that would make it so I wanted to start cautious.) I ran the onions and peppers thru a blender beforehand just to avoid the headache of chopping them, tho let me tell you when I finished blending them and opened the lid of the blender, the onion and pepper fumes were quite overwhelming.

Anyway, other than that I pretty much followed the directions: browned the onions and pepper in olive oil, added the ginger/garlic when it asked me to, put in the other ingredients, stirred the resulting paste around with the chicken, then added the water. I also threw in about a teaspoon or so of sea salt. After about half an hour of cooking I noticed the sauce looked a tad watery, so I added a little more olive oil.

Result: it fuckin rawked. Easily the best curry I've ever made from scratch, maybe better than all the ones I've made from store-bought pastes. Cutting WAY down on the tomato and onion was a smart idea, since that meant the spices came way to the front. My wife really liked it, too.

As for the heat, it was nice and hot, and made my scalp sweat, but I think I should have upped the voltage some. The two obvious ways to do this next time would be to use two whole habaneros and no jalapeños, and to use 2-3 tablespoons of the red chili paste, and not just one. Other than that, I really like the way I tweaked the spices, tho maybe doubling the ginger/garlic paste might be nice as well.
Posted by: Rev. BigDumbChimp on July 18 2007,00:16

Picked up some < Guanciale > from the butcher. Will be making something with that this week. If I can find someone with a curing locker I'm going to try making some. WAY to hot and humid down here in SC to do it the traditional way and hang it outside to cure. Might try in our second fridge but the humidity in a fridge can be an issue.

If you've never had it, it is like pork heaven.
Posted by: Louis on July 18 2007,01:04

Arden,

I'm impressed, your Phaal Research is great, I applaud it. However, the fact that you can still walk after one, let alone walk the next day means you have yet to make one. Also, what's this specifying the meat? Meat in a phaal should be mysterious and of potentially dubious origin. You are follwoing the letter of phaal lawbut not yet the spirit. Fight on curry warrior!

Louis
Posted by: Arden Chatfield on July 18 2007,01:38

Quote (Louis @ July 18 2007,01:04)
Arden,

I'm impressed, your Phaal Research is great, I applaud it.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


I know that I haven't made a truly authentic phaal yet. I'm sort of working up to that. I know most restaurants that serve them do loony things like putting 12 naga jolokias in them.

Recipes for phaal actually are not that easy to find. There's < this > one, which is, uh, awfully basic. Almost no spices, just peppers. If I'm reading it correctly, forty of them. :O

But < this > recipe has potential. Hmmm....



---------------------QUOTE-------------------
However, the fact that you can still walk after one, let alone walk the next day
---------------------QUOTE-------------------



Or, uh, *sit* the next day.



---------------------QUOTE-------------------
means you have yet to make one. Also, what's this specifying the meat? Meat in a phaal should be mysterious and of potentially dubious origin.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------



Isn't the tenderloin of an Alsatian traditional in Britain?



---------------------QUOTE-------------------
You are follwoing the letter of phaal lawbut not yet the spirit. Fight on curry warrior!

---------------------QUOTE-------------------



I consider the true phaal to be a path, not a destination.  :angry:

What happened with those Dorset peppers you ordered?
Posted by: Arden Chatfield on July 18 2007,01:39

Quote (Rev. BigDumbChimp @ July 18 2007,00:16)
Picked up some < Guanciale > from the butcher. Will be making something with that this week. If I can find someone with a curing locker I'm going to try making some. WAY too hot and humid down here in SC to do it the traditional way and hang it outside to cure. Might try in our second fridge but the humidity in a fridge can be an issue.

If you've never had it, it is like pork heaven.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Jesus, that sounds good. Never heard of it before.
Posted by: Louis on July 18 2007,02:24

Quote (Arden Chatfield @ July 18 2007,07:38)
What happened with those Dorset peppers you ordered?
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


They become available at the end of this month, later in August for the really hot versions. There will be a tasting, oh yes, there will. Lawks! My poor intestinal tract!

Louis

P.S. The recipe with 40 odd peppers, no spices, no flavour and Alsatian meat sounds about right. You're right by the way phaal is a journey, and that journey is usually between the lavatory, the fridge and the pharmacy.
Posted by: carlsonjok on July 18 2007,06:26

Woo-hoo!!   A friend sent my wife home yesterday with a huge bag (at least 5 pounds) of fresh-picked okra.  Tonight, I'm making "Chicken Smothered with Okra And Tomatoes" from The Prudhomme Family Cookbook.  And, later this week, fried okra.
Posted by: JohnW on July 18 2007,10:41

Quote (Arden Chatfield @ July 18 2007,01:38)
Isn't the tenderloin of an Alsatian traditional in Britain?
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Arden, Arden, Arden...

We're evilushonists.  We eat babies.
Posted by: Louis on July 18 2007,11:17

Quote (JohnW @ July 18 2007,16:41)
Quote (Arden Chatfield @ July 18 2007,01:38)
Isn't the tenderloin of an Alsatian traditional in Britain?
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Arden, Arden, Arden...

We're evilushonists.  We eat babies.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


One does not curry baby.

Such tender meat is best either barbequed or as a carpaccio.

Honestly, do I have to teach you people EVERYTHING!

Louis
Posted by: Kristine on July 25 2007,23:51

< Drinks all around! > :)
Posted by: stevestory on July 26 2007,19:28

I've been busy and not eating much all week. Tonight: some country style ribs are currently marinating in Guiness-flavored Bull's Eye sauce in the oven on 200º. I'm trying to see if the warm temp helps the sauce infuse into the meat. After an hour or two of that I'll cook them at 400º for an hour. Serve with Miller Lite.

Tomorrow: weekend food and booze blowout.
Posted by: Steverino on July 27 2007,06:53

LOL...whenever I glance this thread name...for some reason, my mind reads it or sees it as "Libations and Combustibles"

Just makes me chuckle.

Although not a scientist and I have never played one on TV, I am a fan.....huge fan who supports the fight and the effort you all make in the name of truth.

Having said that...if you all ever get to Unv. of CT way...drinks are on me!
Posted by: Tracy P. Hamilton on July 27 2007,09:47

Quote (Steverino @ July 27 2007,06:53)
LOL...whenever I glance this thread name...for some reason, my mind reads it or sees it as "Libations and Combustibles"

Just makes me chuckle.

Although not a scientist and I have never played one on TV, I am a fan.....huge fan who supports the fight and the effort you all make in the name of truth.

Having said that...if you all ever get to Unv. of CT way...drinks are on me!
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


I have the same problem with the "Discussing Explore Evolution".
I keep reading it as "Dissing Explore Evolution"

Mandatory thread content - last night had a

< http://www.ratebeer.com/Beer/brooklyn-monster-ale/538 >
Posted by: stevestory on July 27 2007,14:42

Quote (Steverino @ July 27 2007,07:53)
LOL...whenever I glance this thread name...for some reason, my mind reads it or sees it as "Libations and Combustibles"
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


tonight's libations are combustibles.


Posted by: "Rev Dr" Lenny Flank on July 27 2007,21:03

Just spent half the night drinking Amber Bock at a retirement oparty for a good co-worker.

I'm seriosly drunk right now,  (burp)


:)
Posted by: Rev. BigDumbChimp on July 27 2007,23:14

I'm hooked on the Noah's Mill bourbon. Drinking it now. Tomorrow off to a concert in Charlotte, many partakings to be had.

If my mom calls, you don't know where I am.
Posted by: stevestory on July 28 2007,14:06

We'll tell her < He's Not Here. >
Posted by: Paul Flocken on Aug. 01 2007,09:20

This is probably old news for all of y'all but when I read it I immediately thought of Steve S. and company and L&C.  So:

< Just for you Steve. >
Posted by: stevestory on Aug. 01 2007,14:12



---------------------QUOTE-------------------
"It is so hot you can't even imagine," said the farmer, Digonta Saikia, working in his fields in the midday sun, his face nearly invisible behind an enormous straw hat. "When you eat it, it's like dying."
---------------------QUOTE-------------------



Yikes.
Posted by: Arden Chatfield on Aug. 01 2007,14:40

Quote (stevestory @ Aug. 01 2007,14:12)


---------------------QUOTE-------------------
"It is so hot you can't even imagine," said the farmer, Digonta Saikia, working in his fields in the midday sun, his face nearly invisible behind an enormous straw hat. "When you eat it, it's like dying."
---------------------QUOTE-------------------



Yikes.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


< Still not as hot as these. >
Posted by: carlsonjok on Aug. 03 2007,18:58

Wife is off playing bunco, so < this > is on the agenda for tonight.  It is chilling down for that magical time when all the chores are done.


Posted by: stevestory on Aug. 03 2007,19:48

chipotle is very popular right now. Got some chipotle chedder in the fridge. Yesterday got some chipotle sauce added to an italian sub at Subway. Good stuff.
Posted by: carlsonjok on Aug. 03 2007,21:30

Quote (carlsonjok @ Aug. 03 2007,18:58)

---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Verdict:  Good stuff. It isn't the type of thing you drink at the end of a hot day of work, but it was definitely enjoyable.  Flavoring beer with spices is, to me, a difficult thing to do.  There is a real fine line between adding too little and too much. This seems to hit the right balance. You can taste the peppers without it overwhelming the flavor of the underlying beer.
Posted by: stevestory on Aug. 07 2007,18:56

tonight: Johnsonville brats on hot dog buns with spicy brown mustard. Served with Miller Lite Chelada style beer. Possibly cheap vodka to follow.



Posted by: stevestory on Aug. 07 2007,18:59

The miller lite chelada beer is extremely limey. I'm pleased.
Posted by: IanBrown_101 on Aug. 07 2007,19:01

Presumably brats are bratwurst? I get my bratwurst from Lidl, it's a super cheapo supermarket, by my god the German products are good.
Posted by: carlsonjok on Aug. 07 2007,19:15

Quote (stevestory @ Aug. 07 2007,18:59)
The miller lite chelada beer is extremely limey. I'm pleased.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Leave it to an American brewery to really f*** something up.  For a real michelada, here is < a recipe >.  It is best made with a dark lager like Negro Modelo or Indio.
Posted by: stevestory on Aug. 07 2007,19:19

this is clearly not authentic. This is more like a Miller with about 2 tablespoons of lime juice added. Good, though.
Posted by: carlsonjok on Aug. 07 2007,19:25

Quote (stevestory @ Aug. 07 2007,19:19)
this is clearly not authentic. This is more like a Miller with about 2 tablespoons of lime juice added. Good, though.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


I might have to try it.  This weekend the temperature is supposed to be near triple digits and, thanks to an unusually wet spring, I've got some serious brush clearing to do.  That sounds like just the thing to hit the spot after a hot day of work.
Posted by: stevestory on Aug. 09 2007,19:59

tonight's dinner: a sammich constructed from the following ingredients.

3 slices of pastrami
6 small slices of pepperoni
3 strips of romaine lettuce
liberal amounts of chipotle mustard
salt
pepper
garlic powder
oregano
sesame bun
Posted by: stevestory on Aug. 09 2007,20:06

I forgot to add Swiss cheese.
Posted by: carlsonjok on Aug. 14 2007,14:46

I really enjoy the show "Diners, Drive-ins, and Dives" on The Food Network.  On a recent show, they actually featured a place I have eaten at, < The Triple XXX Family Restaurant >, just down the hill from Purdue University in West Lafayette, IN. Seeing the Triple XXX (9 X's?) on TV gave me a craving for a Purvis Burger.  So, tonight for dinner, I am making one for dinner.  

What is a Purvis Burger, you might ask?  Well, it is described thusly:
 

---------------------QUOTE-------------------
The Duane Purvis All-American - A very special taste treat!
 
1/4 lb. of 100% ground sirloin served on a toasted sesame bun with melted cheese on top with lettuce, tomato, pickle, Spanish onion and French fries. Add thick creamy peanut butter on the lower deck and you're in for the touchdown!
---------------------QUOTE-------------------



That is right. Peanut butter on a hamburger.  I can hardly wait!
Posted by: JohnW on Aug. 14 2007,15:01

Quote (carlsonjok @ Aug. 14 2007,14:46)
I really enjoy the show "Diners, Drive-ins, and Dives" on The Food Network.  On a recent show, they actually featured a place I have eaten at, < The Triple XXX Family Restaurant >, just down the hill from Purdue University in West Lafayette, IN. Seeing the Triple XXX (9 X's?) on TV gave me a craving for a Purvis Burger.  So, tonight for dinner, I am making one for dinner.  

What is a Purvis Burger, you might ask?  Well, it is described thusly:
   

---------------------QUOTE-------------------
The Duane Purvis All-American - A very special taste treat!
 
1/4 lb. of 100% ground sirloin served on a toasted sesame bun with melted cheese on top with lettuce, tomato, pickle, Spanish onion and French fries. Add thick creamy peanut butter on the lower deck and you're in for the touchdown!
---------------------QUOTE-------------------



That is right. Peanut butter on a hamburger.  I can hardly wait!
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


The aforementioned "touchdown" being your bum on the toilet seat, presumably.
Posted by: stevestory on Aug. 14 2007,19:30

tonight: Burrito bowls, i.e., burrito contents eaten from a bowl instead of wrapped in a tortilla.

burrito contents created from

1/4 lb chorizo sausage
2 cups black beans
1/2 cup Herdez salsa
1/2 sauteed yellow onion
1/2 bell pepper diced, sauteed
1/2 red pepper diced, sauteed
3 jalapenos diced, sauteed
1 cup shredded mexican cheese blend
1/4 cup cilantro
Posted by: Arden Chatfield on Aug. 14 2007,20:06

Quote (stevestory @ Aug. 14 2007,19:30)
tonight: Burrito bowls, i.e., burrito contents eaten from a bowl instead of wrapped in a tortilla.

burrito contents created from

1/4 lb chorizo sausage
2 cups black beans
1/2 cup Herdez salsa
1/2 sauteed yellow onion
1/2 bell pepper diced, sauteed
1/2 red pepper diced, sauteed
3 jalapenos diced, sauteed
1 cup shredded mexican cheese blend
1/4 cup cilantro
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


No habaneros?

You're going soft as you approach middle age, Steve. ?;)

(Still, it's better than those Tombstone frozen pizzas.)
Posted by: stevestory on Aug. 14 2007,20:08

You're right, I need to spice them up. They were still good, with just all the jalapeno.

and there are definitely Tombstone pizzas in the fridge.
Posted by: Louis on Aug. 15 2007,03:11

Just FYI: The Dorset Nagas are on order.

I'm scared and they haven't yet arrived. I don't even know when they will!

Louis
Posted by: Arden Chatfield on Aug. 15 2007,11:32

Quote (Louis @ Aug. 15 2007,03:11)
Just FYI: The Dorset Nagas are on order.

I'm scared and they haven't yet arrived. I don't even know when they will!

Louis
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


If you suddenly quit posting, will we know why?

If we don't hear from you for a month should we send Stephen Elliott over so he can take pictures and post them here? "Well, you can see from the burn marks here and here that Louis actually suffered quite a lot before he finally..."
Posted by: stevestory on Aug. 16 2007,18:14

The week's fare has been kind of boring. I'm training for a triathlon several months away and so I'm eating more sensibly. Lots of veggies and no booze during the week. To make up for these absurd strictures, I go hog wild on the weekend. I need suggestions for the weekend blowout. Anybody got any favorite dishes?
Posted by: Albatrossity2 on Aug. 16 2007,18:28

Quote (stevestory @ Aug. 16 2007,18:14)
The week's fare has been kind of boring. I'm training for a triathlon several months away and so I'm eating more sensibly. Lots of veggies and no booze during the week. To make up for these absurd strictures, I go hog wild on the weekend. I need suggestions for the weekend blowout. Anybody got any favorite dishes?
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


This may not be "blowout" food, but you will like it, and it generates lots of leftovers, which makes the weekday cooking a bit simpler.

From Food and Wine. I recommend substituting some bacon grease for part of the oil/butter when you saute the leeks. Quick, easy, no fancy ingredients, and truly delicious.
---

Pan-Roasted Chicken and Leeks

ACTIVE TIME: 30 MIN
TOTAL TIME: 55 MIN
SERVES: 4
Four Season Farm co-owner Barbara Damrosch roasts the chicken on a bed of leeks to infuse them with flavor. You can leave the dark green parts on the leeks, but they'll be too tough to eat.
ingredients

   * 2 tablespoons unsalted butter
   * 2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
   * 10 medium leeks (3 pounds)&#151;trimmed, slit and rinsed
   * Salt and freshly ground pepper
   * One 4-pound chicken, cut into 8 pieces
   * 3 rosemary sprigs, halved


directions

  1. Preheat the oven to 450?. Melt 1 tablespoon of the butter in 1 tablespoon of the oil in a skillet. Add the leeks; cook over moderately high heat, turning, until browned in spots, 6 minutes. Transfer to a 9-by-13-inch baking dish, season with salt and pepper and roast for 10 minutes, or until beginning to soften.
  2. Wipe out the skillet. Melt the remaining 1 tablespoon of butter in the remaining 1 tablespoon of oil. Season the chicken with salt and pepper. Add the chicken and rosemary to the skillet; cook over moderate heat until browned, about 10 minutes. Set the chicken on the leeks, skin side up, add the rosemary and roast for about 20 minutes, or until the chicken is cooked through and the leeks are very tender. Serve hot.

wine recommendation Cabernet Franc-based reds from the Loire Valley have enough acidity to cut the richness here. Try the 2000 Charles Joguet Chinon Ch?ne Vert or the 2000 Bernard Baudry Chinon Cuv?e Domaine. (ed note - I also like a nice Zinfandel, eg Seghesio, with this dish. Beer-wise, IPAs go pretty well too)
Posted by: carlsonjok on Aug. 16 2007,18:29

Quote (stevestory @ Aug. 16 2007,18:14)
The week's fare has been kind of boring. I'm training for a triathlon several months away and so I'm eating more sensibly. Lots of veggies and no booze during the week. To make up for these absurd strictures, I go hog wild on the weekend. I need suggestions for the weekend blowout. Anybody got any favorite dishes?
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


How about < Mesquite Crusted & Marinated Pork Tenderloin >?

Using a 2-3 lb tenderloin, it obviously makes alot, so you probably should invite company.
Posted by: stevestory on Aug. 16 2007,18:39

Not sure what the booze is going to be. Magic Hat #9? La Fin Du Monde? Rogue? Beefeaters? Bacardi? Stoli?
Posted by: Louis on Aug. 17 2007,03:06

Quote (stevestory @ Aug. 17 2007,00:39)
Not sure what the booze is going to be. Magic Hat #9? La Fin Du Monde? Rogue? Beefeaters? Bacardi? Stoli?
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Nothing says "decadent" like a pint of creme du menthe.

Louis

P.S. Mind you nothing says "alcoholic" quite as well either.
Posted by: stevestory on Aug. 17 2007,19:44

We're going with a 6 pack of



and a little less than a pint of


Posted by: Arden Chatfield on Aug. 17 2007,19:45

Quote (stevestory @ Aug. 17 2007,19:44)
We're going with a 6 pack of



and a little less than a pint of


---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Not mixed together, I hope?  :O
Posted by: stevestory on Aug. 17 2007,19:51

Oh no of course not. The Beefeater in shots, and the ESB very gradually.
Posted by: Louis on Aug. 18 2007,06:20

You should have combined them! Have you heard of a "Dog's Nose"?

Let me check my Tom Sharpe collection....

....Ah yes! The Grantchester Grind...

< Lord Jeremy Pimpole >

In there you shall find the recipe for the Dog's Nose:

7 ounces of Gin to 13 ounces of Bitter. Lord Pimpole's version is the other way around (roughly!).

Go you ahead!

Louis
Posted by: Richardthughes on Aug. 20 2007,21:50

Can we get Christopher Hitchens on this thread?
Posted by: Arden Chatfield on Aug. 20 2007,21:57

Quote (Richardthughes @ Aug. 20 2007,21:50)
Can we get Christopher Hitchens on this thread?
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


You mean to fill out a sort of "British drunks" theme?
Posted by: Richardthughes on Aug. 20 2007,22:04

Quote (Arden Chatfield @ Aug. 20 2007,21:57)
Quote (Richardthughes @ Aug. 20 2007,21:50)
Can we get Christopher Hitchens on this thread?
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


You mean to fill out a sort of "British drunks" theme?
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Oh, you v\can't ever fill it out. Reality just isn't challenging enough sober..
Posted by: Louis on Aug. 21 2007,04:53

MY CHILLIS HAVE ARRIVED

MY CHILLIS HAVE ARRIVED

I have some jalapenos, some poblanos and of course two packs of the Dorset Naga (the hottest chilli in the world).

I touched the outside of the pack and then my lip and my lip can feel it already. These beauties are rocket fuel!

I'm not going to cook them yet, I am going to ask for chilli based recipe suggestions from the assembled connosieurs of all things chilli.

Have at it lads and ladies. How am I going to cook my super chillis?

Louis
Posted by: Albatrossity2 on Aug. 21 2007,06:11

Quote (Louis @ Aug. 21 2007,04:53)
Have at it lads and ladies. How am I going to cook my super chillis?

Louis
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


More to the point, what is the address where we can send flowers for the funeral?
Posted by: Louis on Aug. 21 2007,06:19

Quote (Albatrossity2 @ Aug. 21 2007,12:11)
Quote (Louis @ Aug. 21 2007,04:53)
Have at it lads and ladies. How am I going to cook my super chillis?

Louis
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


More to the point, what is the address where we can send flowers for the funeral?
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Don't joke, I'm genuinely afriad.

They're still in the bag, in a fridge and I can taste them if I walk into the tea area at work where the fridge is(People's tea might be spicier than expected). Bear in mind that I work in a lab, the exciting smell of stored chemicals and various noxious fumes is nothing odd to me. The sheer chemical heat these beasts give off through two layers of plastic and a closed fridge door is impressive.

I am tempted to take some gloves from the lab, take a teeny slice of one and taste it for real, but I have work to do, dribbling and shooting fire from any given orifice are not conducive to that process.

Fear the chilli, it is mighty and I am weak.

Louis

P.S. No flowers please, just some chilled toilet paper and Savlon.
Posted by: Louis on Aug. 21 2007,09:38

Ok so when I said I was tempted to try a bit of a chilli and that this would be stupid and therefore I wouldn't do it, I erm, well, was mistaken!

I did cut a bit off the chilli (wearing some gloves and using a new, clean scapel, on a clean paper covered surface!). I should have done it in a fume cupboard. Whoa are these things spicy!. I took about a square millimetre of the flesh and popped it onto the tip of my tongue. YOWZA!!!! This is unlike anything I have had before and I have eaten raw habaneros whole in a Mexican restaurant. It is genuinely the most searing chilli I have encountered, it also tastes great! Really sweet and fresh, just unbelievably spicy. I am going to turn one set into chilli jam/preserve and I am going to cook with the other set. Chilli for 4000 seems about right.

Louis
Posted by: Arden Chatfield on Aug. 21 2007,09:53

Well, Louis, there's always < this. >:p

Actually, there should be a lot of ideas < here. >
Posted by: k.e on Aug. 21 2007,10:12

Quote (Arden Chatfield @ Aug. 21 2007,17:53)
Well, Louis, there's always < this. >:p

Actually, there should be a lot of ideas < here. >
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


32 years ago in a restaurant in Bangkok I was 'treated' to a  local speciality that was 'tweaked' by some locals to give it some extra 'character'.
Let me just say it involved some beef and chillies.
I can say I have never been the same since and so could they, presumably.
Posted by: stevestory on Aug. 21 2007,10:13

Quote (Louis @ Aug. 21 2007,07:19)
Quote (Albatrossity2 @ Aug. 21 2007,12:11)
Quote (Louis @ Aug. 21 2007,04:53)
Have at it lads and ladies. How am I going to cook my super chillis?

Louis
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


More to the point, what is the address where we can send flowers for the funeral?
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Don't joke, I'm genuinely afriad.

They're still in the bag, in a fridge and I can taste them if I walk into the tea area at work where the fridge is(People's tea might be spicier than expected). Bear in mind that I work in a lab, the exciting smell of stored chemicals and various noxious fumes is nothing odd to me. The sheer chemical heat these beasts give off through two layers of plastic and a closed fridge door is impressive.

I am tempted to take some gloves from the lab, take a teeny slice of one and taste it for real, but I have work to do, dribbling and shooting fire from any given orifice are not conducive to that process.

Fear the chilli, it is mighty and I am weak.

Louis

P.S. No flowers please, just some chilled toilet paper and Savlon.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


I'm generally pretty opposed to toilet humor, but 'chilled toilet paper' was pretty funny.
Posted by: k.e on Aug. 21 2007,10:19



---------------------QUOTE-------------------
I'm generally pretty opposed to toilet humor, but 'chilled toilet paper' was pretty funny.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------



pfffft give me sand paper and a branding iron.
Posted by: Louis on Aug. 21 2007,10:24

Quote (stevestory @ Aug. 21 2007,16:13)
Quote (Louis @ Aug. 21 2007,07:19)
Quote (Albatrossity2 @ Aug. 21 2007,12:11)
 
Quote (Louis @ Aug. 21 2007,04:53)
Have at it lads and ladies. How am I going to cook my super chillis?

Louis
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


More to the point, what is the address where we can send flowers for the funeral?
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Don't joke, I'm genuinely afriad.

They're still in the bag, in a fridge and I can taste them if I walk into the tea area at work where the fridge is(People's tea might be spicier than expected). Bear in mind that I work in a lab, the exciting smell of stored chemicals and various noxious fumes is nothing odd to me. The sheer chemical heat these beasts give off through two layers of plastic and a closed fridge door is impressive.

I am tempted to take some gloves from the lab, take a teeny slice of one and taste it for real, but I have work to do, dribbling and shooting fire from any given orifice are not conducive to that process.

Fear the chilli, it is mighty and I am weak.

Louis

P.S. No flowers please, just some chilled toilet paper and Savlon.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


I'm generally pretty opposed to toilet humor, but 'chilled toilet paper' was pretty funny.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Toilet humour?

I guess you could flush the tissue paper after blowing your nose on its cooling wonderfulness (hot chillis do make your nose run after all, and the chilled paper cools the sore and chapped skins wonderfully). What did you mean?

Louis (Innocent as several new born lambs who've just been put through innocent school on an innocent scholarship for the amazingly innocent.)
Posted by: k.e on Aug. 21 2007,10:28



---------------------QUOTE-------------------
Louis (Innocent as several new born lambs who've just been put through innocent school on an innocent scholarship for the amazingly innocent.)
---------------------QUOTE-------------------



FFS

I hope you get mauled by Argentina in the Rugby world cup, then eaten by Samoa.
Posted by: Louis on Aug. 21 2007,10:37

Quote (k.e @ Aug. 21 2007,16:28)


---------------------QUOTE-------------------
Louis (Innocent as several new born lambs who've just been put through innocent school on an innocent scholarship for the amazingly innocent.)
---------------------QUOTE-------------------



FFS

I hope you get mauled by Argentina in the Rugby world cup, then eaten by Samoa.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Tchoh! The way we're playing, we probably will!

Louis

P.S. You do realise that that addendum after my name was a joke right? Have you been drinking again? If long words and cheeky phraseology upset you so, might I suggest a course of jamming your head repeatedly up your arse followed by a short stint of get over it? ;)
Posted by: carlsonjok on Aug. 22 2007,08:24

< Experience British Dining, or An American Gourmand in London >
Posted by: J-Dog on Aug. 22 2007,11:14

Quote (carlsonjok @ Aug. 22 2007,08:24)
< Experience British Dining, or An American Gourmand in London >
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Funny stuff... and probably 90% true.  It reminds me of a scene in European Vacation where Chevy Chase as Clark Griswold from Chicago pulls out a translation dictionary to try and understand what the English clerk says to him at a hotel.

I would expect Richard to have stories to tell about Bad American Service too.
Posted by: Louis on Aug. 23 2007,10:33

Quote (carlsonjok @ Aug. 22 2007,14:24)
< Experience British Dining, or An American Gourmand in London >
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Insular, American fuck finds world is not like America, whines about it.

Film at eleven.

Louis

P.S. If travel broadens the mind it failed in this case. I feel about Americans who do this the way I feel about Brits who go to Spain for the fish and chips: STAY THE FUCK HOME. Guess what, there are those of us who travel and...uhuh...ENJOY the differences! Wow, what a concept. I realise that there are roughly 250 million people on this planet who think that the USA is the epitome of everything good, but there are roughly 60 million people who think that the UK is, and about the same who think that France is etc. Guess what? They're all wrong!

Fuck it, I'm in a mood. It must be this haircut. I see it and think that someone has to die.

(I'm only kidding by the way)

P.P.S. There are excellent aspects of American dining culture which should under no circumstances be repeated in the UK. I cite Hooters as one example. A pneumatic blonde arrives at your table and says "Hi, I'm CanDI? I'll be your waitRESS? Would you like fries with THAT?", this works. A barely literate scrubber from Solihull slouches up to your table in a boob tube and in a deep Brummie accent drawls "Yow want froiz?", this does not work. The Americans do some things very well. Not merely Hooters. They do not all translate.
Posted by: k.e on Aug. 23 2007,10:56



---------------------QUOTE-------------------
Insular, American fuck finds world is not like America, whines about it.

---------------------QUOTE-------------------



Oh you know, being slavered over by the serving classes with a grudge, insincerly grovelling for their Servis Compris under a psychosis induced by fear of instant unemployement for questioning fascism is just my thing.

Some things you just can't translate into American

Give me distain any day.
Posted by: J-Dog on Aug. 23 2007,10:56

Quote (Louis @ Aug. 23 2007,10:33)
Quote (carlsonjok @ Aug. 22 2007,14:24)
< Experience British Dining, or An American Gourmand in London >
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Insular, American fuck finds world is not like America, whines about it.

Film at eleven.

Louis

P.S. If travel broadens the mind it failed in this case. I feel about Americans who do this the way I feel about Brits who go to Spain for the fish and chips: STAY THE FUCK HOME. Guess what, there are those of us who travel and...uhuh...ENJOY the differences! Wow, what a concept. I realise that there are roughly 250 million people on this planet who think that the USA is the epitome of everything good, but there are roughly 60 million people who think that the UK is, and about the same who think that France is etc. Guess what? They're all wrong!

Fuck it, I'm in a mood. It must be this haircut. I see it and think that someone has to die.

(I'm only kidding by the way)

P.P.S. There are excellent aspects of American dining culture which should under no circumstances be repeated in the UK. I cite Hooters as one example. A pneumatic blonde arrives at your table and says "Hi, I'm CanDI? I'll be your waitRESS? Would you like fries with THAT?", this works. A barely literate scrubber from Solihull slouches up to your table in a boob tube and in a deep Brummie accent drawls "Yow want froiz?", this does not work. The Americans do some things very well. Not merely Hooters. They do not all translate.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Travel DOES broaden the mind, and sometimes the stomach. ?Ever since that Fateful Trip To Monreal, (the biggest French speaking city in the world BTW after Paris) I have always eschewed ketchup on fries, and instead have ordered fries with malt vinegar.

No. ?Wearing a beret would be silly.  Unless I had a bad haircut.  :)
Posted by: "Rev Dr" Lenny Flank on Aug. 23 2007,12:19

Quote (Louis @ Aug. 23 2007,10:33)
Insular, American fuck finds world is not like America, whines about it.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


But, ya know, the whole world WANTS to be American.

At gunpoint, if necessary.


;)
Posted by: Louis on Aug. 23 2007,12:44

Quote ("Rev Dr" Lenny Flank @ Aug. 23 2007,18:19)
Quote (Louis @ Aug. 23 2007,10:33)
Insular, American fuck finds world is not like America, whines about it.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


But, ya know, the whole world WANTS to be American.

At gunpoint, if necessary.


;)
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Yeah, but some of us just don't know it yet.

Louis
Posted by: Knev_Ydoc on Aug. 23 2007,15:48

I may be an insular whiny fuck, but at least I can go to any restaurant I want, ask for a cup of water, and fill it with as much ice as I please.


For free.
Posted by: Louis on Aug. 24 2007,05:08

Quote (Knev_Ydoc @ Aug. 23 2007,21:48)
I may be an insular whiny fuck, but at least I can go to any restaurant I want, ask for a cup of water, and fill it with as much ice as I please.


For free.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Ah, the pinnacle of existence. Well done, you must be so very proud.

Louis

P.S. Just FYI McDonalds, Burger King, KFC, Wendys, Arbys. Subway, Taco Bell, Dominos, Pizza Hut, Caesars, In and Out, Hooters, various greasy diners, etc etc ad extreme nauseum =/= restaurant.
Posted by: Louis on Aug. 24 2007,05:14

Oh and I forgot to add:

To all the simple minded whiny fucks out there, of all nations, creeds and colours, don't merely stay the fuck home (for the rest of the world is not interested in you), don't fucking breed. If you have children, please kill them and then yourselves. If you can take a few of your likeminded neighbours with you, so much the better. The world needs less dumb, do the world a favour.
Posted by: k.e on Aug. 24 2007,05:41

Quote (Knev_Ydoc @ Aug. 23 2007,23:48)
I may be an insular whiny fuck, but at least I can go to any restaurant I want, ask for a cup of water, and fill it with as much ice as I please.


For free.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Thats great, there should be more of it.

I can't tink of a better way to get rid of toxic waste EXCEPT PUT IT IN COKE BOTTLE AND SHOVE IT.
Posted by: Knev_Ydoc on Aug. 24 2007,13:13

Quote (k.e @ Aug. 24 2007,05:41)
Thats great, there should be more of it.

I can't tink of a better way to get rid of toxic waste EXCEPT PUT IT IN COKE BOTTLE AND SHOVE IT.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


And, if you're in London, sell it for 4.30 pounds.
Posted by: Louis on Aug. 25 2007,03:32

Quote (Knev_Ydoc @ Aug. 24 2007,19:13)
Quote (k.e @ Aug. 24 2007,05:41)
Thats great, there should be more of it.

I can't tink of a better way to get rid of toxic waste EXCEPT PUT IT IN COKE BOTTLE AND SHOVE IT.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


And, if you're in London, sell it for 4.30 pounds.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


You must be going to the shitty places.

Mostly it's ?8.50.

Louis

P.S. a) London=/=UK. You can get coke for ?0.80 outside the capital. b) Overcharging whiny, insular Yanks in bars and generally treating you like shit is a tradition. We don't like whiny, insular Yanks, so we treat you like crap in the hope you'll go back to Kansas, Kentucky or wherever the hell you multichinned, ignorant hillbilly fucks are from. This is a trick we learned from the French. When ignorant, multichinned, inbred clueless fucks from England go to France, they get overcharged and treated like shit, so they don't go again. Those of us who speak French (or at least try), realise that France is a different country and don't act like ignorant, multichinned, inbred clueless fucks get to go back. There may be a clue there. Smart Yanks good, stupid Yanks bad. Hell, let's do away with the word "Yank" and merely insert "tourist".
Posted by: Knev_Ydoc on Aug. 25 2007,04:44



---------------------QUOTE-------------------
P.S. a) London=/=UK.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------



I think if you re-read my post you'll find I mentioned only London and made no generalizations about the UK. Had I visited the entire UK, I would've said so and written a post about it. As it stands, I'm well acquainted with the London=/=UK principle in geography.


 

---------------------QUOTE-------------------
This is a trick we learned from the French.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------



You almost sound like you're proud of this.


Finally, to assist you with your stereotypes, I'm from Texas, and I prefer epithets that involve Wac[k]o cults, gun-totin' craziness, and steers/queers dichotomies.
Posted by: Louis on Aug. 25 2007,05:02

Ah good. My apologies for getting my stereotypes wrong and apologies for missing the bit about your realisation that London=/=UK. Mea maxima culpa.

Can we hope any time soon you will realise that America=/=world? And that as such value systems, social discourse, the vagaries of diverse and different groups of humans are likely to contain things that are not the same as those things you are used to?

Re Stereotypes: Would you accept "Relgious cult loving, Messiah complex, barbeque obsessed, Stetson wearing, overly compensating closet homosexual with more guns than brain cells"?

Seems to me that many of the Texans I know fit that stereotype at least as poorly as any other I can conjure. Of course you DO realise that stereotypes are meant to be inaccurate don't you? You do realise that by using stereotypes I was making a humourous point: i.e. that engaging in this kind of small minded silliness is a problem?

And what do you mean I ALMOST sound like I am proud of the trick we learned from the French? Of course I'm bloody proud of it! In fact I'm so proud of it I wish we'd taught it to the French, but they are so much better at it than we are we clearly didn't. You think that tolerance of small minded, shallow, whining stupidity is a good thing? Wow! I don't!

As a wise man once said: there are three types of people in this world. There's the glass half full people, the glass half empty people, and the people who when they are handed a glass complain  "Hey, I ordered orange juice, this is lemonade, I ordered orange juice. Listen here buddy, when I ask for orange juice I want fucking orange juice, what are you fucking stupid?".

I can live with the first kind, I can live with the second kind. The third kind are scum who need to be eradicated from the face of the earth.

{Louis waits and sees just how THAT will be misinterpreted}

Louis
Posted by: Arden Chatfield on Aug. 25 2007,11:08

On other subjects, Louis, have you tried those Naga Jolokias out on that Sikh uncle-in-law of yours?
Posted by: Louis on Aug. 25 2007,11:50

Quote (Arden Chatfield @ Aug. 25 2007,17:08)
On other subjects, Louis, have you tried those Naga Jolokias out on that Sikh uncle-in-law of yours?
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


LMFAO!

Arden,

You have an exceptional memory! Well done. Coincidentally I am off to Leicester tomorrow morning to do just that! (Well that and have a bit of a social with some of my wife's family).

I hope he takes my warnings seriously this time.

Louis

P.S. I have made chilli jam with some of them. 6 Dorset Nagas to about 450g of tomatoes. It is hot, tasty as hell, but hot. I also did burritos with Nagas and a bog standard shicken curry with Nagas. They are hot but so so tasty (if you like that almost melony note to a habanero taste that is).
Posted by: Arden Chatfield on Aug. 25 2007,12:33



---------------------QUOTE-------------------
You have an exceptional memory! Well done. Coincidentally I am off to Leicester tomorrow morning to do just that! (Well that and have a bit of a social with some of my wife's family).

I hope he takes my warnings seriously this time.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------



Tell him he won't be a real man unless he eats some of them. You can always appeal to a Sikh's sense of machismo. (Or whatever the Punjabi word for that is.)

 

---------------------QUOTE-------------------
I have made chilli jam with some of them. 6 Dorset Nagas to about 450g of tomatoes. It is hot, tasty as hell, but hot. I also did burritos with Nagas and a bog standard chicken curry with Nagas. They are hot but so so tasty (if you like that almost melony note to a habanero taste that is).
---------------------QUOTE-------------------



I know exactly what you mean. Beneath the burn, habaneros have a much nicer flavor than jalapenos. Jalapenos are milder than habaneros, but they have a sort of bitter edge to their flavor that I'm not all that impressed with. Plus, jalapenos burn and burn and burn forever, while habaneros do a sort of scorched-earth thing to you, but it's over quicker.

PS: How do you use chili jam?
Posted by: Stephen Elliott on Aug. 25 2007,14:40

WTF is it with you chaps? Why would anyone want to eat someting that is so hot that it overwhelmes your tastebuds to he extent that you could be eating anything? Damned if I can understand (unless it is a test of bravado).

EDIT: Back to watching "Sharpe".
Posted by: Arden Chatfield on Aug. 25 2007,15:35

Quote (Stephen Elliott @ Aug. 25 2007,14:40)
WTF is it with you chaps? Why would anyone want to eat someting that is so hot that it overwhelmes your tastebuds to he extent that you could be eating anything? Damned if I can understand (unless it is a test of bravado).
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


< If you have to ask, you'll never understand: >



---------------------QUOTE-------------------
A number of studies have claimed that the reaction of pain receptors to the hotter ingredients in curries, even Korma, leads to the body's release of endorphins and combined with the complex sensory reaction to the variety of spices and flavours, a natural high is achieved that causes subsequent cravings, often followed by a desire to move on to hotter curries. Some refer to this as addiction, but other researchers contest the use of the word "addiction" in this instance. Additionally, curry addiction is an example of a colloquial use of the word "addiction" as the medical definition of the word requires continued use despite harmful effects.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Posted by: Stephen Elliott on Aug. 25 2007,15:50

Quote (Arden Chatfield @ Aug. 25 2007,15:35)
Quote (Stephen Elliott @ Aug. 25 2007,14:40)
WTF is it with you chaps? Why would anyone want to eat someting that is so hot that it overwhelmes your tastebuds to he extent that you could be eating anything? Damned if I can understand (unless it is a test of bravado).
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


< If you have to ask, you'll never understand: >



---------------------QUOTE-------------------
A number of studies have claimed that the reaction of pain receptors to the hotter ingredients in curries, even Korma, leads to the body's release of endorphins and combined with the complex sensory reaction to the variety of spices and flavours, a natural high is achieved that causes subsequent cravings, often followed by a desire to move on to hotter curries. Some refer to this as addiction, but other researchers contest the use of the word "addiction" in this instance. Additionally, curry addiction is an example of a colloquial use of the word "addiction" as the medical definition of the word requires continued use despite harmful effects.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Korma?
Good grief korma has nothing hot in it.
Sounds like a damned weak excuse to me.

Now (in yhe UK at least) most hot dish eaters do this to express how manly they are whilst never doing anything more dangerous than getting pissed at the weekend and going on to eat something hot.

But I could be wrong.
Posted by: Arden Chatfield on Aug. 25 2007,16:41

Quote (Stephen Elliott @ Aug. 25 2007,15:50)
 
Quote (Arden Chatfield @ Aug. 25 2007,15:35)
?
Quote (Stephen Elliott @ Aug. 25 2007,14:40)
WTF is it with you chaps? Why would anyone want to eat someting that is so hot that it overwhelmes your tastebuds to he extent that you could be eating anything? Damned if I can understand (unless it is a test of bravado).
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


< If you have to ask, you'll never understand: >

 

---------------------QUOTE-------------------
A number of studies have claimed that the reaction of pain receptors to the hotter ingredients in curries, even Korma, leads to the body's release of endorphins and combined with the complex sensory reaction to the variety of spices and flavours, a natural high is achieved that causes subsequent cravings, often followed by a desire to move on to hotter curries. Some refer to this as addiction, but other researchers contest the use of the word "addiction" in this instance. Additionally, curry addiction is an example of a colloquial use of the word "addiction" as the medical definition of the word requires continued use despite harmful effects.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Korma?
Good grief korma has nothing hot in it.
Sounds like a damned weak excuse to me.

Now (in yhe UK at least) most hot dish eaters do this to express how manly they are whilst never doing anything more dangerous than getting pissed at the weekend and going on to eat something hot.

But I could be wrong.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


You poor, poor man. Well, maybe someday you'll understand, like us beautiful people.

[pats head condescendingly] ;)
Posted by: Stephen Elliott on Aug. 25 2007,16:50

Quote (Arden Chatfield @ Aug. 25 2007,16:41)
...
You poor, poor man. Well, maybe someday you'll understand, like us beautiful people.

[pats head condescendingly] ;)
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


I doubt that is possible. I was (unfortunately) born ugly.

Hence: You beautifull people can  just..........Fuck Off!


*Takes slapped head easilly*
Posted by: Arden Chatfield on Aug. 25 2007,16:59

Quote (Stephen Elliott @ Aug. 25 2007,16:50)
Quote (Arden Chatfield @ Aug. 25 2007,16:41)
...
You poor, poor man. Well, maybe someday you'll understand, like us beautiful people.

[pats head condescendingly] ;)
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


I doubt that is possible. I was (unfortunately) born ugly.

Hence: You beautifull people can ?just..........Fuck Off!


*Takes slapped head easilly*
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Stephen, Stephen, Stephen. Beauty is a state of mind, don't you know, old boy? It's all right there in that 'science and religion' thread.

Except for Richard Hughes. He's just... well... he frightens blind people. Seriously, take my word for it. :O
Posted by: stevestory on Aug. 25 2007,18:29

as far as yesterday's libations, my connecting flight back to RDU was delayed 5 hours, so the flight attendant gave me lots of free booze. 4 screwdrivers makes a bad flight into a good flight.

Tonight, I bought some veal that was on sale, but I'm not sure what to do with it. might just pan-fry it in olive oil. might cook pasta and sauce and make veal parm.
Posted by: carlsonjok on Aug. 25 2007,19:06

Quote (stevestory @ Aug. 25 2007,18:29)
Tonight, I bought some veal that was on sale,
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Why, Steve, why?!?!?!?!?!?



EDIT:  Go with Schnitzel.
Posted by: Wesley R. Elsberry on Aug. 25 2007,19:07



---------------------QUOTE-------------------

But I could be wrong.

---------------------QUOTE-------------------



< Like Tim Wilson? >

Oh, that's not anywhere near work-safe.
Posted by: stevestory on Aug. 25 2007,23:05

BTW, thanks to Rev. BigDumbChimp's blog, I've started to notice the fat content in meat, and he's right, much of it is too lean to taste good. Pork chops are too lean, and a bit more fat really adds to the mouthfeel. The veal tonight had a high fat content and was delicious.

(yeah, I have some ethical problems with veal too. I'm a hypocrite, I confess.)
Posted by: Stephen Elliott on Aug. 26 2007,05:31

Quote (Wesley R. Elsberry @ Aug. 25 2007,19:07)


---------------------QUOTE-------------------

But I could be wrong.

---------------------QUOTE-------------------



< Like Tim Wilson? >

Oh, that's not anywhere near work-safe.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


That was funny.
:D
Posted by: stevestory on Aug. 26 2007,17:57

thanks to a sale at Harris Teeter, tonight's dinner is stuffed crab cakes and Saranac Trail Mix.




Posted by: IanBrown_101 on Aug. 26 2007,18:20

Quote (stevestory @ Aug. 25 2007,23:05)
BTW, thanks to Rev. BigDumbChimp's blog, I've started to notice the fat content in meat, and he's right, much of it is too lean to taste good. Pork chops are too lean, and a bit more fat really adds to the mouthfeel. The veal tonight had a high fat content and was delicious.

(yeah, I have some ethical problems with veal too. I'm a hypocrite, I confess.)
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Well unless it's the young animals thing, there isn't much to worry about with British veal. Veal cages were banned over a decade ago, and the animals are now reared well, kept in good condiions and made to be happy.

They're still killed, but hey, we want meat.
Posted by: Albatrossity2 on Aug. 26 2007,18:45

We are having the kitchen renovated starting tomorrow, so we are looking at at least a month of microwave or restaurant food. So tonight it is roasted potatoes, chicken with leeks (recipe posted previously) and this ale



Excellent!
Posted by: stevestory on Aug. 26 2007,19:06

Dogfish Head 90 minute is pretty good.
Posted by: Albatrossity2 on Aug. 26 2007,20:00

Quote (stevestory @ Aug. 26 2007,19:06)
Dogfish Head 90 minute is pretty good.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Yeah, and at 9% alcohol, it is pretty potent too. I will be toddling off to bed soon...
Posted by: carlsonjok on Aug. 26 2007,20:39

Quote (Albatrossity2 @ Aug. 26 2007,18:45)
We are having the kitchen renovated starting tomorrow, so we are looking at at least a month of microwave or restaurant food.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


A month? Good googly moogly! I just finished a week without air conditioning and hot water due to a foundation repair and new HVAC install. I think I prefer my ordeal over being without a kitchen for a month.

On topic: Boulevard Bully Porter is not a real good choice for a drink when you dealing with the heat. The only thing that tasted good was ice cold Coca-Cola.


Posted by: Richardthughes on Aug. 27 2007,16:47


Posted by: stevestory on Aug. 27 2007,20:09

What a horrible week it's been. So today I took some time off, read a bit, drank some coffee, swam a 1/4 mile and played tennis for a while. Tonight we're looking at steamed broccoli in a cheese sauce, the rest of that veal, pan-fried, and a small bottle of vodka.
Posted by: Arden Chatfield on Aug. 27 2007,20:52

Another hot curry, a variation on the same recipe I've been fiddling with all summer. This is how I tweaked it this time:

6 chicken thighs
1 smallish yellow onion, run thru blender & sauteed in olive oil
1 tbsp habanero chili powder
1 teaspoon liquidy store-bought Indian chili paste
1 tbsp hot curry powder
1 tomato, run thru blender
[no fresh chilis, I was all out and my corner store has a shitty selection]
2 heaping tbsp's ginger/garlic paste (smelly stuff!)
1 small teaspoon vindaloo curry paste
lots o' dried coriander
2 tablespoons Lemon Juice

Still ain't done, so I can't pronounce a verdict yet.

Hmmm. It's a different color from my other death curries. Sort of more light yellow/orangy rather than reddish-brown.
Posted by: Rev. BigDumbChimp on Aug. 28 2007,09:04

Quote (stevestory @ Aug. 26 2007,19:06)
Dogfish Head 90 minute is pretty good.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


One of my all time favorites.

If you like that try the Great Divide Brewery Hercules Double IPA.
Posted by: Albatrossity2 on Aug. 28 2007,09:09

Quote (Rev. BigDumbChimp @ Aug. 28 2007,09:04)
 
Quote (stevestory @ Aug. 26 2007,19:06)
Dogfish Head 90 minute is pretty good.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


One of my all time favorites.

If you like that try the Great Divide Brewery Hercules Double IPA.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


We can't generally get the Dogfish head brews here in Kansas; those were imported on a recent trip to Coloroado.

At least one store here carries the the Great Divide Denver Pale Ale and their Titan IPA; both are delicious. Today (day 2 of the kitchen remodeling) may be a good day to try both when I get home.
Posted by: "Rev Dr" Lenny Flank on Aug. 28 2007,18:33

Quote (carlsonjok @ Aug. 26 2007,20:39)
Quote (Albatrossity2 @ Aug. 26 2007,18:45)
We are having the kitchen renovated starting tomorrow, so we are looking at at least a month of microwave or restaurant food.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


A month? Good googly moogly! I just finished a week without air conditioning and hot water due to a foundation repair and new HVAC install. I think I prefer my ordeal over being without a kitchen for a month.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


I have, quite literally, never plugged my stove in.  I don't even know if it works.  I nuke *everything*.  I still have the same microwave that I moved here from Pennsylvania with, ten years ago.

On weekends, when I have the time, I usually cook with a homemade solar oven.

As for AC, I generally don't run it at all.  In the past few weeks we've had record-high temps in Tampa (96-97), so I've taken to running the AC for two or three hours -- but only on those afternoons when I'm actually at home.  My preferred room temp is about 82-83 (that preference probably comes from 20-plus years of snake-keeping).
Posted by: Arden Chatfield on Aug. 28 2007,18:54

The curry came out very hot but good. My scalp sweated like a sumbitch. I think the heat was entirely due to the habanero powder.

Lunch today: local little hole-in-the-wall Messkin restaurant, pozole, better than I've ever been able to make. Came with what appeared to be a few pork ribs in it. I dumped in the little chopped onions and a little of the habanero sauce that came on the side. Frigging awesome, only $6. One of the perks of living in urban California -- cheap, abundant, authentic, high quality Mexican restaurants. Tell me again why immigration is supposed to be such a bad thing?
Posted by: Arden Chatfield on Aug. 28 2007,18:55

Quote ("Rev Dr" Lenny Flank @ Aug. 28 2007,18:33)
As for AC, I generally don't run it at all. ?In the past few weeks we've had record-high temps in Tampa (96-97), so I've taken to running the AC for two or three hours -- but only on those afternoons when I'm actually at home. ?My preferred room temp is about 82-83 (that preference probably comes from 20-plus years of snake-keeping).
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Let me guess: all you eat is a couple rats per month, and after you eat one you sleep for a week. Am I right?
Posted by: stevestory on Aug. 28 2007,19:28

man, I'm eating the most scrumptious taco salad right now.

seasoned shredded chicken
sauteed onion
chopped green onion
diced bell pepper
herdez hot salsa
4 cheese mexican blend
cilantro
diced jalapenos
salt
pepper
garlic
sour cream
refried beans
several crunchy tostadas cracked up
Posted by: "Rev Dr" Lenny Flank on Aug. 28 2007,19:50

Quote (Arden Chatfield @ Aug. 28 2007,18:55)
Quote ("Rev Dr" Lenny Flank @ Aug. 28 2007,18:33)
As for AC, I generally don't run it at all. ?In the past few weeks we've had record-high temps in Tampa (96-97), so I've taken to running the AC for two or three hours -- but only on those afternoons when I'm actually at home. ?My preferred room temp is about 82-83 (that preference probably comes from 20-plus years of snake-keeping).
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Let me guess: all you eat is a couple rats per month, and after you eat one you sleep for a week. Am I right?
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Ahhhhh, what a life.

Excuse me while I go shed my skin.

;)
Posted by: carlsonjok on Aug. 28 2007,19:59

Quote (Arden Chatfield @ Aug. 28 2007,18:54)
One of the perks of living in urban California -- cheap, abundant, authentic, high quality Mexican restaurants. Tell me again why immigration is supposed to be such a bad thing?
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Oklahoma is the same way. I have a little over a six mile drive to my favorite Mexican restaurant. The first four miles are country road and, in the final two miles, I have to directly pass three other Mexican restaurants and within a short detour to another four.

Around here, Mexican restaurants are like religion. Everyone has their favorite and is fiercely loyal to it. Of course, most everyone else is wrong, except those that agree with me.
Posted by: stevestory on Aug. 28 2007,20:55

Quote (Arden Chatfield @ Aug. 28 2007,19:54)
One of the perks of living in urban California -- cheap, abundant, authentic, high quality Mexican restaurants. Tell me again why immigration is supposed to be such a bad thing?
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Because they drive to and from those nice authentic restaurants with asshole pseudomufflers that destroy the peace?


Posted by: "Rev Dr" Lenny Flank on Aug. 28 2007,21:03

Quote (carlsonjok @ Aug. 28 2007,19:59)
Around here, Mexican restaurants are like religion. Everyone has their favorite and is fiercely loyal to it. Of course, most everyone else is wrong, except those that agree with me.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


One thing I miss about Pennsylvania (well, Allentown at least) is the large number of Arab restaurants there (Allentown has a large Syrian and Lebanese population).  Since I moved to Florida, I haven't had a decent falafel or hummus.

The Beirut Restaurant in Allentown had *the* best Arab food.  Alas, I've heard that it's now closed.  I also heard that when the invasion of Iraq began, some dickhead redneck tried to burn the place down.

Oh, and the other thing I miss most about PA is the shoo-fly pie.   MMMMMMMMMMMM.     ;)
Posted by: Arden Chatfield on Aug. 28 2007,21:06



---------------------QUOTE-------------------

The Beirut Restaurant in Allentown had *the* best Arab food. ?Alas, I've heard that it's now closed. ?I also heard that when the invasion of Iraq began, some dickhead redneck tried to burn the place down.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------



Ironically, they were probably Lebanese Christians.



---------------------QUOTE-------------------
Oh, and the other thing I miss most about PA is the shoo-fly pie. ? MMMMMMMMMMMM. ? ? ?

---------------------QUOTE-------------------



What the fuck is shoo-fly pie???
Posted by: "Rev Dr" Lenny Flank on Aug. 28 2007,21:17

Quote (Arden Chatfield @ Aug. 28 2007,21:06)
What the fuck is shoo-fly pie???
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Ahhhh, food of the gods . . . .


It's not really "pie", although it's in a pie crust:  it's a very sugary molasses-cake-like pie, covered with brown sugar, and with a quarter-inch of pure molasses at the bottom.

Your teeth will hurt just LOOKING at it, but hey, I can down the stuff by the pound. Who needs teeth anyway.

It gets its name from all the molasses, which attracts flies, hence "shoo-fly".

If I thought the stuff would tolerate a trip through the mail, I'd ask someone in PA to Fed Ex me a couple.  It's been a few years since I had one.
Posted by: stevestory on Sep. 02 2007,21:05

tonight's dinner:

sashimi. (yellowtail $6/lb at Harris Teeter right now)



and a 6 pack of black hook.




Posted by: Richardthughes on Sep. 02 2007,21:16

Your yellowtail looks a bit salmony!

I love sashimi!
Posted by: Stephen Elliott on Sep. 02 2007,21:27

Quote (Richardthughes @ Aug. 27 2007,16:47)

---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Black pudding? God, I love that stuff.
What could be better than fried congealed pigs blood?
Posted by: Darth Robo on Sep. 03 2007,08:10



---------------------QUOTE-------------------
What could be better than fried congealed pigs blood?
---------------------QUOTE-------------------



Everything!    :(

My mate loves it.   You're all sick sick people!    :angry:
Posted by: Arden Chatfield on Sep. 03 2007,10:40

Quote (Stephen Elliott @ Sep. 02 2007,21:27)
Quote (Richardthughes @ Aug. 27 2007,16:47)

---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Black pudding? God, I love that stuff.
What could be better than fried congealed pigs blood?
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


And this from the man who can't understand why people would eat hot chillies. Oy.  ;)
Posted by: k.e on Sep. 03 2007,11:16

Quote (Arden Chatfield @ Sep. 03 2007,18:40)
Quote (Stephen Elliott @ Sep. 02 2007,21:27)
 
Quote (Richardthughes @ Aug. 27 2007,16:47)

---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Black pudding? God, I love that stuff.
What could be better than fried congealed pigs blood?
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


And this from the man who can't understand why people would eat hot chillies. Oy. ?;)
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Black Pudding's Very Black Today!< Ripping Yarns: The Testing Of Eric Olthwaite - Part 1 >
Posted by: Stephen Elliott on Sep. 03 2007,12:32

Quote (k.e @ Sep. 03 2007,11:16)
?
Quote (Arden Chatfield @ Sep. 03 2007,18:40)
?And this from the man who can't understand why people would eat hot chillies. Oy. ?;)
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Black Pudding's Very Black Today!< Ripping Yarns: The Testing Of Eric Olthwaite - Part 1 >
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Arden: Touche.
k.e.: Very funny link. I had forgotten all about ripping yarns before you started with the links.
Posted by: k.e on Sep. 03 2007,12:59

Quote (Stephen Elliott @ Sep. 03 2007,20:32)
Quote (k.e @ Sep. 03 2007,11:16)
?  
Quote (Arden Chatfield @ Sep. 03 2007,18:40)
?And this from the man who can't understand why people would eat hot chillies. Oy. ?;)
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Black Pudding's Very Black Today!< Ripping Yarns: The Testing Of Eric Olthwaite - Part 1 >
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Arden: Touche.
k.e.: Very funny link. I had forgotten all about ripping yarns before you started with the links.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


If the UD geniui keep going we'll get through all of them.

Like Across the Apalatians by mushroom with Bill and Dave......er I mean Andes by Frog.

I must say I haven't seen this one and the line "we didn't ask for school girls" has a certain naughtyness that will keep me away until the end.

< Across the Andes by Frog 2/4 >
Posted by: stevestory on Sep. 05 2007,19:10

Tonight: Quesadillas with heaping helpings of El Yucateco Salsa Picante de Chile Habanero.




Posted by: stevestory on Sep. 05 2007,19:14

it's only about 3 times hotter than tabasco sauce, but applied liberally that's still something.
Posted by: Arden Chatfield on Sep. 05 2007,20:06

making a big pot o' pozole tonight:

6 lb can of Mexican-style hominy
2.5 lbs of pork shoulder, diced, fat mostly removed
1 yellow onion
5 cloves garlic
1 small can sliced pickled jalapenos
1 small can diced tomatoes with mild green chili
1 tablespoon Mexican chili powder
1 teaspoon habanero powder

(I know, I know, I'm too lazy today to cut up my own chilis.)

throw everything in pot. cook at least 2 hours.

This massive pot should last us 2-3 days.
Posted by: IanBrown_101 on Sep. 06 2007,07:14

Personally I'm a fan of both the fried blood sausage and very spciy foods (although I don't think I'm QUITE on the level of some of you, I like to taste other things the next day, for example) but then, I love haggis, so what do I know?
Posted by: stevestory on Sep. 06 2007,20:50

This training diet is just killing me. Even though it's not all that strict. Basically it's just, all week, no alcohol and ~2000 calories. The two weekend days, do what you want. My weekend days are friday and saturday, because would you rather go out drinking friday or sunday? friday of course.

Today I've had a quesadilla, a mcdonalds double cheeseburger, a Caesar salad, and one of these



with the aforementioned El Yucateco green habanero sauce. The only thing I've had to drink all week is coffee and icewater.

I will be one happy dude to see the weekend arrive.
Posted by: stevestory on Sep. 13 2007,22:21

when I go to McDonalds for take-out, I can barely stand to be in there long enough to pick up my order. Every 5 seconds some screeching alarm goes off. Anyone else have that experience?
Posted by: Richardthughes on Sep. 14 2007,11:25

OYSY for lunch:

< http://www.oysysushi.com/ >


Fiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiissssssssssssssssshhhhh!!!111oneoneone
Posted by: Arden Chatfield on Sep. 14 2007,11:34

Quote (stevestory @ Sep. 13 2007,22:21)
when I go to McDonalds for take-out, I can barely stand to be in there long enough to pick up my order. Every 5 seconds some screeching alarm goes off. Anyone else have that experience?
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Alarm? What kind of alarm, exactly?

I haven't gone into a McD's for three years, and that was because my daughter insisted. After many years away from them I can't stand the way they all smell.
Posted by: stevestory on Sep. 14 2007,11:36

Alarms on everything. Piercing, shrieking alarms, often multiple alarms at the same time. They probably have alarms to tell you no alarms are currently active. It's been years since I've been able to sit in a McDonalds.
Posted by: carlsonjok on Sep. 16 2007,21:56

Tonight was a visit to the State Fair. On the menu was roasted corn on the cob, a gyro, deep fried macaroni and cheese, an elephant ear, and a deep fried Snickers Bar.  And fresh made root beer and < Choc Beer > to wash it down.

Further, if I am lucky, my < new smoker > should arrive tomorrow!!1!!11!one!!!
Posted by: stevestory on Sep. 16 2007,23:05

Been very busy lately. Today's food consists of several sammiches. Harris Teeter's got deli stuff on sale this week.

sammich ingredients:

pepperoni
roast turkey
muenster cheese

take those bits and microwave until hot and melty, then add to

Guldens brown mustard
pepperidge farm sammich buns
lettuce

To drink is french-pressed espresso beans.
Posted by: stevestory on Sep. 20 2007,17:44

Last day of the training diet for the week. Tonight's dinner: tortellini. Maybe some fish sticks. Broccoli. A sandwich.

Tomorrow: woohoo! Probably like a Pizza Hut Supreme pizza and a case of Corona.
Posted by: BWE on Sep. 20 2007,18:43

Quote (stevestory @ Sep. 20 2007,17:44)
Last day of the training diet for the week. Tonight's dinner: tortellini. Maybe some fish sticks. Broccoli. A sandwich.

Tomorrow: woohoo! Probably like a Pizza Hut Supreme pizza and a case of Corona.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


I had a case of corona once but it cleared up in a few hours. Don't worry, it's nothing a little sleep won't cure.
Posted by: carlsonjok on Sep. 20 2007,20:12

Quote (stevestory @ Sep. 20 2007,17:44)
Tomorrow: woohoo! Probably like a Pizza Hut Supreme pizza and a case of Corona.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Maybe it is just me, but I have never had a Corona that didn't have a slightly skunky taste to it.  Gave up on it years ago.
Posted by: stevestory on Sep. 20 2007,20:33

I've never tried this Chimay stuff people talk about, but I think they carry it at the local Harris Teeter. Might give it a go.
Posted by: k.e on Sep. 20 2007,22:58

Quote (stevestory @ Sep. 21 2007,04:33)
I've never tried this Chimay stuff people talk about, but I think they carry it at the local Harris Teeter. Might give it a go.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


If I can be so bold as to make a suggestion. Chimay should be drunk like wine, with a great meal.

If after a hot day you grab it and skull it like a larger you will wonder what all the fuss is about.

So have a couple of glasses of water first to kill the thirst and that will allow you to drink the Chimay slowly and enjoy the flavor.


Posted by: k.e on Sep. 20 2007,23:13

Quote (Richardthughes @ Sep. 14 2007,19:25)
OYSY for lunch:

< http://www.oysysushi.com/ >


Fiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiissssssssssssssssshhhhh!!!111oneoneone
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


< Sushi Heresy >
Posted by: Rev. BigDumbChimp on Sep. 21 2007,13:52

Work has slowed slightly so, new entries at < Pork and Whiskey >. Many more coming soon. I have a fridge full of about 20 different kinds of beer. Reviews a plenty.
Posted by: Richardthughes on Sep. 21 2007,14:06

< Baked Potato >
Posted by: Steverino on Sep. 21 2007,16:18

Quote (stevestory @ Sep. 06 2007,20:50)
This training diet is just killing me. Even though it's not all that strict. Basically it's just, all week, no alcohol and ~2000 calories. The two weekend days, do what you want. My weekend days are friday and saturday, because would you rather go out drinking friday or sunday? friday of course.

Today I've had a quesadilla, a mcdonalds double cheeseburger, a Caesar salad, and one of these



with the aforementioned El Yucateco green habanero sauce. The only thing I've had to drink all week is coffee and icewater.

I will be one happy dude to see the weekend arrive.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


If you want to drink on those two days...try a Captain Morgan and Diet Pepsi.  No fat, very low cal and carbs.

Its the official drink of us long time bodybuilders!
Posted by: carlsonjok on Sep. 22 2007,16:50

Dinner tonight:  A brisket I just took out of the smoker after 9 hours over apple wood and a < Flying Dog Pale Ale. >

Doesn't get any better than this!
Posted by: stevestory on Sep. 22 2007,17:02

last night:



Posted by: carlsonjok on Sep. 22 2007,17:15

Quote (stevestory @ Sep. 22 2007,17:02)
last night:



---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Excellent.  You are still a young un.  But I am glad to see your commitment to a healthy prostate. That will pay dividends when you pass 40.
Posted by: stevestory on Sep. 22 2007,22:12

tonight:



and some jerk chicken, pistacios, cheetos, and red wine.



Posted by: Arden Chatfield on Sep. 23 2007,11:17

Quote (stevestory @ Sep. 22 2007,17:02)
last night:



---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Frozen pizza and vodka. Good lord, Steve, how old are you, 22?  ;)
Posted by: stevestory on Sep. 23 2007,11:26

Frozen pizza and vodka is good at any age.
Posted by: Arden Chatfield on Sep. 23 2007,11:33

Can't stop poking around with my own curries. This is the goal for tonight:



I've marinated the chicken, spices, and yogurt together in a bag in the fridge for 36 hours, since it's supposed to make the flavor 'fuller'.

Tonight I sautee the whole goopy mess with a tomato or two, a shredded yellow onion, a buncha garlic, and maybe one or two of those skinny green Indian chillies for more zing:


Posted by: Louis on Sep. 24 2007,07:45

This last fortnight I have been mstly eating:

Meze (including such diverse elements as dolmades, stifado, kleftico, pistaccio, moussaka, village salad, pastourma, loukanika, seftalia, souvla, souvlaki, keftedes, tvakas, kebabs, potatoes, couscous, pasta [the proper name of which escapes me] and a whole slew of things containing pork), beer and zivaniya. I did see a vegetable, but it was being eaten by what was about to be my dinner.

I am in pain. But it was gooooooooood

Louis

P.S. I also ate carob fresh from my uncle's carob trees, chillis from his chilli bushes, and had lime in my gin and tonic from his gin and tonic tree...no wait, I made an error there. I think my uncle is possibly the happiest bloke on the planet. He gets up each day, waters his many trees and plants, picks the fruit for the day and then wanders into the hills around his home village of Psevda to pick wild vegetables. You couldn't get the smile of that guy's face with a jack hammer.
Posted by: Alan Fox on Sep. 24 2007,10:11

Welcome back, Louis, pleased to hear you had a good time.
Can we look forward to the chillie report, now?
Posted by: Richardthughes on Sep. 24 2007,10:13

Quote (Louis @ Sep. 24 2007,07:45)
This last fortnight I have been mstly eating:

Meze (including such diverse elements as dolmades, stifado, kleftico, pistaccio, moussaka, village salad, pastourma, loukanika, seftalia, souvla, souvlaki, keftedes, tvakas, kebabs, potatoes, couscous, pasta [the proper name of which escapes me] and a whole slew of things containing pork), beer and zivaniya. I did see a vegetable, but it was being eaten by what was about to be my dinner.

I am in pain. But it was gooooooooood

Louis

P.S. I also ate carob fresh from my uncle's carob trees, chillis from his chilli bushes, and had lime in my gin and tonic from his gin and tonic tree...no wait, I made an error there. I think my uncle is possibly the happiest bloke on the planet. He gets up each day, waters his many trees and plants, picks the fruit for the day and then wanders into the hills around his home village of Psevda to pick wild vegetables. You couldn't get the smile of that guy's face with a jack hammer.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Dear Louis,
I am filing for divorce.


Cordially,
Your lower intestine.
PS - I get custody of your sphincter.
Posted by: k.e on Sep. 24 2007,10:30

OH HAHAHA, HOMO!
WELL I'M ON A < BABY DIET > GET IN MY BELLY! d.t.
Posted by: Louis on Sep. 24 2007,10:39

Quote (Richardthughes @ Sep. 24 2007,16:13)
Quote (Louis @ Sep. 24 2007,07:45)
This last fortnight I have been mstly eating:

Meze (including such diverse elements as dolmades, stifado, kleftico, pistaccio, moussaka, village salad, pastourma, loukanika, seftalia, souvla, souvlaki, keftedes, tvakas, kebabs, potatoes, couscous, pasta [the proper name of which escapes me] and a whole slew of things containing pork), beer and zivaniya. I did see a vegetable, but it was being eaten by what was about to be my dinner.

I am in pain. But it was gooooooooood

Louis

P.S. I also ate carob fresh from my uncle's carob trees, chillis from his chilli bushes, and had lime in my gin and tonic from his gin and tonic tree...no wait, I made an error there. I think my uncle is possibly the happiest bloke on the planet. He gets up each day, waters his many trees and plants, picks the fruit for the day and then wanders into the hills around his home village of Psevda to pick wild vegetables. You couldn't get the smile of that guy's face with a jack hammer.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Dear Louis,
I am filing for divorce.


Cordially,
Your lower intestine.
PS - I get custody of your sphincter.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Dear Lower Intestine,

You're welcome to it, the damn thing hasn't worked right since that incident in the Belgian Congo.

Zulus. Thousands of them.

Etc

Louis
Posted by: Louis on Sep. 24 2007,10:41

Quote (Alan Fox @ Sep. 24 2007,16:11)
Welcome back, Louis, pleased to hear you had a good time.
Can we look forward to the chillie report, now?
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Thanks Alan.

How detailed a report are you after? I mentioned the chillis a few pages back, they were hot and they were good, are the assembled masses interested in the {ahem} fallout? I have photos...

Hey! Where are you all going. Guys....Guys?

Damn!

Louis
Posted by: J-Dog on Sep. 24 2007,14:36

You all need to eat some proper food -

Last nights dinner was Bangers & Mash and Smithwicks at The Celtic Knot:

< >
Posted by: Arden Chatfield on Sep. 27 2007,19:08

< This > tonight:

 

---------------------QUOTE-------------------
Lemon Garlic Chicken Thighs Recipe
Ingredients
6 chicken thighs .
1/2 tsp oregano .
1/2 tsp garlic powder .
1/8 c vegetable oil (I use olive) .
1/2 tsp salt (add this to water if soaking) .
2 tsps lemon rind, grated (my addition) .
1/4 c lemon juice .
1/4 tsp black pepper .
1/4 c soy sauce

Directions
Step #1 Soak the chicken pieces in salted water for 20 mins (or just rinse if you're in a hurry), then pat the pieces dry & lay them in a baking dish.
Step #2 They should be a bit crowded, touching each other.
Step #3 Mix up the rest of the ingredients & pour over the chicken, then let this stand for 20 mins.
Step #4 Bake at 400F degrees for 45 mins or until until done.
Enjoy the Lemon Garlic Chicken Thighs recipe
---------------------QUOTE-------------------



Still trying to find a good Cuban lemon chicken recipe that will replicate what I've had in the Versailles Cuban restaurant in LA.
Posted by: Richardthughes on Sep. 28 2007,15:24

Quote (J-Dog @ Sep. 24 2007,14:36)
You all need to eat some proper food -

Last nights dinner was Bangers & Mash and Smithwicks at The Celtic Knot:

< >
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Deja Vu!
Posted by: stevestory on Sep. 29 2007,18:37

Salad:

entire head of romaine lettuce chopped up
Ken's Creamy Cesar dressing
Il Villagio grated parmesan cheese
Rothsbury farms croutons
Posted by: Arden Chatfield on Sep. 29 2007,19:19

Quote (stevestory @ Sep. 29 2007,18:37)
Salad:

entire head of romaine lettuce chopped up
Ken's Creamy Cesar dressing
Il Villagio grated parmesan cheese
Rothsbury farms croutons
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


No hot peppers anywhere?

Steve, you're going soft.  :(
Posted by: stevestory on Sep. 29 2007,19:36

I've been so busy lately I haven't even had much time to eat. Crazy, I know. All I've had today is that salad, a shot of Tanqueray, and a nice sammich made of pastrami, pepperoni, mustard, lettuce, olive oil and cayenne pepper. I've got a case of Budweiser in the fridge but I don't know if I'm going to get to it tonight.

Funny story though--yesterday around lunchtime my boss gave me a flask and said "Take this home. It's some good Brazilian (something I forget) made out of cane sugar. It's very sweet but has a nice kick" He was horrified and unsure what to do when I turned it up and drank some. He likes booze too, but like most Americans, gets a little weird when he sees you have a drink at lunch.
Posted by: stevestory on Sep. 29 2007,19:40

Speaking of spicy peppers, a Jamaican friend told me a while back that nobody in Jamaica makes their own Jerk mixture from scratch, they just buy the premade stuff. So I bought some from McCormicks or however you spell it. That was a mistake. No heat at all. Good thing I had some high-octane Scotch Bonnet sauce in the fridge.
Posted by: fusilier on Oct. 01 2007,09:28

Quote (stevestory @ Sep. 29 2007,19:36)
{snip} I've got a case of Budweiser in the fridge but I don't know if I'm going to get to it tonight.

{snip}
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


I presume you mean the beer from Ceske Budejovice, not the {insert synonym for equine kidney ultrafiltrate} from  St. Louis?

fusilier, who's out of Maudite, and needs to drop by the local grog shop
James 2:24
Posted by: JohnW on Oct. 01 2007,11:38

Quote (fusilier @ Oct. 01 2007,07:28)
Quote (stevestory @ Sep. 29 2007,19:36)
{snip} I've got a case of Budweiser in the fridge but I don't know if I'm going to get to it tonight.

{snip}
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


I presume you mean the beer from Ceske Budejovice, not the {insert synonym for equine kidney ultrafiltrate} from  St. Louis?

fusilier, who's out of Maudite, and needs to drop by the local grog shop
James 2:24
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


After many years of lawsuits, the drinkable stuff is available in the US now, under the name Czechvar.  Which means it's impossible to buy it without straining the eye-rolling muscles.
Posted by: stevestory on Oct. 06 2007,20:40

Tonight:


Posted by: stevestory on Oct. 06 2007,20:41

Sierra Nevada Pale Ale is great.
Posted by: stevestory on Oct. 12 2007,20:19

Home Run pizza



and chianti


Posted by: stevestory on Oct. 16 2007,00:10

Harris Teeter had a BOGO sale on their soups so tonight it's a Lobster Bisque with a 6 pack of Sierra Nevada Pale Ale.
Posted by: drew91 on Oct. 18 2007,17:28

Quote (stevestory @ Sep. 29 2007,19:40)
Speaking of spicy peppers, a Jamaican friend told me a while back that nobody in Jamaica makes their own Jerk mixture from scratch, they just buy the premade stuff. So I bought some from McCormicks or however you spell it. That was a mistake. No heat at all. Good thing I had some high-octane Scotch Bonnet sauce in the fridge.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


I like this stuff.  I usually buy them a dozen at a time

< http://www.walkerswood.com/product_detail.asp?pID=5 >
< http://www.walkerswood.com/product_detail.asp?pID=1 >

I augment with habaneros as needed, as it's really not all that hot.  Of course it'll still blow the doors off of anything McCormick's making.

The traditional is really good for mixing up with ground beef for jerk burgers.  It gives them a really nice flavor and a little heat.
Posted by: stevestory on Oct. 18 2007,21:07

Walkers Wood is what my friend's part-jamaican girlfriend told me to get. So I'm definitely going to get that. Tonight I bought some pre-cooked chicken from the Harris Teeter deli. It had some herbs on it, and I added the heat. Also, I haven't been able to mentally recover from the aftermath of that fire so I'm going to forgo the training diet and I need a little oblivion, so we're having some of this



and a little bit of this



and a great deal of this



and maybe I'll be back in the swing of things after a few days. I'm hoping it will pass, but I have the strongest ennui I've ever felt lately.


Posted by: stevestory on Oct. 18 2007,21:25

Like happened with coffee years ago, I finally got a beer palate. I can really detect and distinguish the basic flavors. Thoughts so far:

Stout: bleh
Porters: eh, they're okay. Guiness is pretty good.
Ales: Good. Sierra Nevada Pale Ale is f&%$ing fantastic.
Lagers: Tasteless but okay.
Posted by: carlsonjok on Oct. 18 2007,21:42

Quote (stevestory @ Oct. 18 2007,21:25)
Ales: Good. Sierra Nevada Pale Ale is f&%$ing fantastic.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Ha! I am drinking a couple of those tonight while watching USF-Rutgers.  Saving the rest for OU-ISU and Texas Tech-Missouri on Saturday.
Posted by: Richardthughes on Oct. 18 2007,21:51

Quote (stevestory @ Oct. 18 2007,21:25)
Like happened with coffee years ago, I finally got a beer palate.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Ahhh.... palate.. that region above the crotch but below the nipples?
Posted by: Louis on Oct. 19 2007,02:33

Quote (stevestory @ Oct. 19 2007,03:25)
Like happened with coffee years ago, I finally got a beer palate. I can really detect and distinguish the basic flavors. Thoughts so far:

Stout: bleh
Porters: eh, they're okay. Guiness is pretty good.
Ales: Good. Sierra Nevada Pale Ale is f&%$ing fantastic.
Lagers: Tasteless but okay.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Steve,

1) Guinness is a stout, not a porter.

2) You misspelt "fucking".

3) Ennui? Dude I hear ya. The cure is MORE BEER. What was the problem again?

Louis
Posted by: stevestory on Oct. 19 2007,10:51

Guiness is okay. The other stouts I've tried were bleh.
Posted by: blipey on Oct. 19 2007,11:20

Quote (stevestory @ Oct. 19 2007,10:51)
Guiness is okay. The other stouts I've tried were bleh.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


For your stout research, I offer:

1.  Young's Double Chocolate: for a beer drinker who thinks he doesn't like stouts and would like to drink one (even if it's a bit girlie)

2.  Beamish: a bit smoother and slightly maltier than Guiness, a true stout for those who want a somewhat softer beer

3.  Guiness Extra-Stout:  this is the original Guiness bottle, not the Draught can or bottle that have come around in the last few years.  This beer is not the same as your Guiness out of the tap, it's has a more metallic flavor and a much higher alcohol content.  For those who like a bite in the beer.

4.  Sapporo Black Stout (as if it could e another color): for the adventurous, who knew the Japanese could make a stout.  Well...I think they're very mediocre at it, a smoothish beer with not much bite, a starter stout perhaps?

Domestics and Craft Brews:

1.  Boulevard Brewing Co (Kansas City, MO) Dry Stout: a stout for the beginner.  This beer hasn't got a lot of body and is a little thin and watery.  Definitely for people who want to drink a stout because it looks cool, but who don't really like stout.

2.  Magic Hat Brewery (Burlington, VT) Heart of Darkness:  Delicious, my favorite American Stout.  ahas a nice bitter chocolate aftertaste, nice and malty, with just the right bitterness.  only drawback is that this is brewed seasonally--only in the winter

3.  North Coast Brewing Co. (Ft. Bragg, CA) Old Rasputin Imperial Russian Stout:  a super intense brew, very delicious, slightly metallic, hint of roasted nuts, a brew that is stout enough (flavor-wise) that one is good enough for me.

Some other darker beers you might try (these are not stouts):

1.  Old Engine Oil (Harvestoun Brewer; Dollar, Scotland):  a Scottish Ale that tastes faintly of barley, chocolate, malt, ad is slightly sweet.  sort of a dessert beer

2.  Old Peculier (Theakston's Brewery; Yorkshire, England): a full malt brew that has a slightly fruity nose.  worth finding here in the states.

Most (if not all) of these brews you can get in your better liquor stores.  So, drink up.
Posted by: Louis on Oct. 19 2007,11:31

You "forgot" (I'll accept "didn't know about" in its place) Mackeson Stout (I hope you get it in the USA). A well poured pint can support a 2p coin on the head of the pint.

It's not a bad stout, although I have had better. Can be eaten with a spoon and is often used in hand to hand combat.

Louis
Posted by: carlsonjok on Oct. 19 2007,11:34

Quote (Louis @ Oct. 19 2007,11:31)
You "forgot" (I'll accept "didn't know about" in its place) Mackeson Stout (I hope you get it in the USA). A well poured pint can support a 2p coin on the head of the pint.

It's not a bad stout, although I have had better. Can be eaten with a spoon and is often used in hand to hand combat.

Louis
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Damn you, Louis, I was going to mention Mackesons, which is a favorite of mine.  We do get it in the States, although I was surprised to find out that it isn't imported, but is brewed here under license.  

Interestingly, the US version of Mackeson's has a a higher alcohol content than the British version, 5.0% versus 3.75%.  Just further proof that you Brits are bunch of royalist pansies.
Posted by: Occam's Toothbrush on Oct. 19 2007,11:42

Quote (stevestory @ Oct. 18 2007,22:25)
Like happened with coffee years ago, I finally got a beer palate. I can really detect and distinguish the basic flavors. Thoughts so far:

Stout: bleh
Porters: eh, they're okay. Guiness is pretty good.
Ales: Good. Sierra Nevada Pale Ale is f&%$ing fantastic.
Lagers: Tasteless but okay.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Hear hear on the SNPA.  The pile of empties in my recycling closet is so big it's #$&#%@ embarassing.
Posted by: blipey on Oct. 19 2007,11:51

I have not had the pleasure of a Mackeson.  I will be going to Gomer's in a couple minutes to see if I can acquire one.

On the topic of Sierra Nevada PA: I've had better, but it is a nice brew.
Posted by: Louis on Oct. 19 2007,11:53

Quote (carlsonjok @ Oct. 19 2007,17:34)
Quote (Louis @ Oct. 19 2007,11:31)
You "forgot" (I'll accept "didn't know about" in its place) Mackeson Stout (I hope you get it in the USA). A well poured pint can support a 2p coin on the head of the pint.

It's not a bad stout, although I have had better. Can be eaten with a spoon and is often used in hand to hand combat.

Louis
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Damn you, Louis, I was going to mention Mackesons, which is a favorite of mine.  We do get it in the States, although I was surprised to find out that it isn't imported, but is brewed here under license.  

Interestingly, the US version of Mackeson's has a a higher alcohol content than the British version, 5.0% versus 3.75%.  Just further proof that you Brits are bunch of royalist pansies.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


I remember when I got to the USA 13 years and 2 months ago to live there for a while as an undergraduate I decided to use my recently faked ID to get me some beers.

Over Main Street to Tops Friendly Markets I went and promptly bought myself (and the roommates who would be arriving soon) three cases of beer. I bought Labatts Blue, Budweiser and one of the "new" ice beers (they were "new" in 1994 I was assured by the clerk). My new roommates arrived, introductions were done and then I broke out the beers. These fresh faced and lovely young American lads had barely ever seen a beer before. I explained the basic principles. Over the course of the evening's early section I noticed I had drunk the entire case of Bud by myself and had moved onto the Labatts. I was also sober as a sodding judge. I remarked on this to my new American chums (who were all drunk as beasts) who assured me that the strength of the American beer, it was not so good.

Frankly, as I have said on many occasions, until the rise of the microbrews and things like Pete's Wicked Ale etc, all the American beer I have encountered was like making love in a canoe.

Anyway, more of a Special Brew man myself! It's the drink of Kings and Tramps!*

Louis

* Seriously, never drink Carlesberg Special Brew UNLESS you are 17 and wanting to get horrendously drunk or are a gentleman of the road (that'a a Harold Ramp to you rhyming slang enthusiasts). It's horrible and ridiculously strong. Further reading drinking, se: Diamond White, White Lightning, Strongbow Super, Kestrel Super, Mad Dog Tewenty Twenty, Thunderbird, 40s of Malt Liquor etc
Posted by: carlsonjok on Oct. 19 2007,12:04

Quote (Louis @ Oct. 19 2007,11:53)
 
Quote (carlsonjok @ Oct. 19 2007,17:34)
Interestingly, the US version of Mackeson's has a a higher alcohol content than the British version, 5.0% versus 3.75%.  Just further proof that you Brits are bunch of royalist pansies.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


I remember when I got to the USA 13 years and 2 months ago to live there for a while as an undergraduate I decided to use my recently faked ID to get me some beers.

Over Main Street to Tops Friendly Markets I went and promptly bought myself (and the roommates who would be arriving soon) three cases of beer. I bought Labatts Blue, Budweiser and one of the "new" ice beers (they were "new" in 1994 I was assured by the clerk).
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Tops Friendly Market?  Labatt's Blue?  Good God, man, you were in Upstate New York?  

Surely, you must have had Genesee Cream Ale.  There is nothing, I say nothing, like the Creamer Screamers the next morning!  All the effectiveness of Phillips Milk of Magnesia with the added bonus of a pounding headache
Posted by: blipey on Oct. 19 2007,12:06

Sounds like the upper Midwest version of Grainbelt, or if you're in Pittsburgh, Iron City Beer.
Posted by: Louis on Oct. 19 2007,12:10

Quote (carlsonjok @ Oct. 19 2007,18:04)
Quote (Louis @ Oct. 19 2007,11:53)
   
Quote (carlsonjok @ Oct. 19 2007,17:34)
Interestingly, the US version of Mackeson's has a a higher alcohol content than the British version, 5.0% versus 3.75%.  Just further proof that you Brits are bunch of royalist pansies.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


I remember when I got to the USA 13 years and 2 months ago to live there for a while as an undergraduate I decided to use my recently faked ID to get me some beers.

Over Main Street to Tops Friendly Markets I went and promptly bought myself (and the roommates who would be arriving soon) three cases of beer. I bought Labatts Blue, Budweiser and one of the "new" ice beers (they were "new" in 1994 I was assured by the clerk).
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Tops Friendly Market?  Labatt's Blue?  Good God, man, you were in Upstate New York?  

Surely, you must have had Genesee Cream Ale.  There is nothing, I say nothing, like the Creamer Screamers the next morning!  All the effectiveness of Phillips Milk of Magnesia with the added bonus of a pounding headache
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Yup. Buffalo at SUNY Buffalo. Goodyear Hall, Main St, Buffalo. It was a great laugh. I almost turned up to a class once. (I've matured since then, honest)

Incidentally don't tell anyone, but I really enjoyed myself and loved upstate NY. Shhhh, my reputation as a Yank baiting UK nationalist King lover will be destroyed.

I did have Genesee Cream Ale, as well as a few other things that were perfectly good. But I had to discover these things by trial and error. There was a lot of error!

Louis
Posted by: carlsonjok on Oct. 19 2007,12:21

Quote (Louis @ Oct. 19 2007,12:10)
 
Quote (carlsonjok @ Oct. 19 2007,18:04)

Tops Friendly Market?  Labatt's Blue?  Good God, man, you were in Upstate New York?  

Surely, you must have had Genesee Cream Ale.  There is nothing, I say nothing, like the Creamer Screamers the next morning!  All the effectiveness of Phillips Milk of Magnesia with the added bonus of a pounding headache
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Yup. Buffalo at SUNY Buffalo. Goodyear Hall, Main St, Buffalo. It was a great laugh. I almost turned up to a class once. (I've matured since then, honest)

Incidentally don't tell anyone, but I really enjoyed myself and loved upstate NY. Shhhh, my reputation as a Yank baiting UK nationalist King lover will be destroyed.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


I can understand that.  God's country up there.  I like living in the Southern Plains, but have been jonesing lately about getting back to Upstate NY. I could do without the winters, but it would sure be nice to be back within driving distance of innumerable wineries. An old college roommate of mine has recently taken over management of his families < winery and brewery. >  They have a < Trippelbock > that is absolutely stellar and an ingredient in a great stew recipe.
Posted by: Richardthughes on Oct. 19 2007,17:44

Tonight:







WooOOoo! Go Fridays!
Posted by: carlsonjok on Oct. 19 2007,18:40

Quote (Richardthughes @ Oct. 19 2007,17:44)
Tonight:







WooOOoo! Go Fridays!
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


What? Are you in Topeka or something?!?!?
Posted by: Arden Chatfield on Nov. 05 2007,20:30

This thread needed to be bumped back to the front page.

Okay, lazy man's curry tonight:



Mix 5 tbsp of the above sauce with 5 chicken thighs, add ¼ cup yogurt, let marinade 6 hours.

Then, sautee an onion in some olive oil, add the aforementioned chicken goop, brown the whole mess, then add a pureed tomato. Simmer for 50 minutes. Yum!
Posted by: carlsonjok on Nov. 05 2007,21:37

Quote (Arden Chatfield @ Nov. 05 2007,20:30)
This thread needed to be bumped back to the front page.

Okay, lazy man's curry tonight:



Mix 5 tbsp of the above sauce with 5 chicken thighs, add ¼ cup yogurt, let marinade 6 hours.

Then, sautee an onion in some olive oil, add the aforementioned chicken goop, brown the whole mess, then add a pureed tomato. Simmer for 50 minutes. Yum!
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


I guess that makes me a lazy man.  I use Patak's all the time. Although my approach varies. I usually cook this as an afterthought, so I normally don't have yogurt on hand or time to marinade.  I just parboil the chicken until cooked through, then debone and pull into smaller pieces.  I'll then saute up onion, bell pepper, and some garlic in olive oil.  When the peppers start to soften, I add the chicken, 5 tablespoons of Patak's, a can of diced tomatoes, and chicken broth to get the right consistency. Then simmer for 20-30 minutes and serve!
Posted by: stevestory on Nov. 05 2007,23:50

been just too busy to do much cooking lately. But today I learned from a friend that you can cook bacon in the microwave. So I just finished an excellent BLT.

Tomato
Bacon
Romaine lettuce
french bread
gulden's spicy brown mustard
freshly ground pepper
olive oil
garlic powder
cayenne powder
< Epicurean Tuscan butter >

and a 6-pack of Icehouse with lime juice squirted in.
Posted by: stevestory on Nov. 05 2007,23:54

yesterday I made a sammich like so:

turkey pastrami
beef salami
Romaine lettuce
french bread
gulden's spicy brown mustard
freshly ground pepper
olive oil
garlic powder

and added some scotch bonnet sauce. The effect was terrible. Turns out an italian sub is not a dish you want to be absurdly hot.
Posted by: Arden Chatfield on Nov. 06 2007,13:40

Quote (carlsonjok @ Nov. 05 2007,21:37)
     
Quote (Arden Chatfield @ Nov. 05 2007,20:30)
This thread needed to be bumped back to the front page.

Okay, lazy man's curry tonight:



Mix 5 tbsp of the above sauce with 5 chicken thighs, add ¼ cup yogurt, let marinade 6 hours.

Then, sautee an onion in some olive oil, add the aforementioned chicken goop, brown the whole mess, then add a pureed tomato. Simmer for 50 minutes. Yum!
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


I guess that makes me a lazy man.  I use Patak's all the time. Although my approach varies. I usually cook this as an afterthought, so I normally don't have yogurt on hand or time to marinade.  I just parboil the chicken until cooked through, then debone and pull into smaller pieces.  I'll then saute up onion, bell pepper, and some garlic in olive oil.  When the peppers start to soften, I add the chicken, 5 tablespoons of Patak's, a can of diced tomatoes, and chicken broth to get the right consistency. Then simmer for 20-30 minutes and serve!
---------------------QUOTE-------------------



Actually, I use Patak's pastes all the time. I especially like their Hot Curry Paste. My own cooking skills, while improving, are somewhat mediocre, at least for complicated things like producing things like a good curry from scratch. Generally when I try to make a curry from scratch, it's just not as yummy as some wonderful oily Patak's curry made with 4 minutes prep time.

This is a recipe I've been using as sort of a springboard lately:

     

---------------------QUOTE-------------------
Ingredients

1. Mutton pieces or Chicken 1/2 kg.
2. Bunch of Coriander/Cilantro. More than a handful. Well chopped.
3. 4-5 Red Chillies
4. 1 tbsp Pepper Powder.
5. Ginger-Garlic paste- 1 tbsp
6. 2 Onions
7. 1 Tomato
8. Oil - 2 tbsp
9. Salt to taste

Fry the onions for a while. Then add ginger-garlic paste and fry a little longer.
Make a paste out of Coriander, red chillies, pepper powder, tomato and fried onions (from step 1 ).
Take a wok and put in the paste and heat well. Keep stirring until paste thickens and the raw smell disappears.
Add some water, mutton or chicken pieces and cook for 20 minutes.
If it is mutton you will have to pressure cook for 3-4 whistles. Stir once in a while and add water if you require a little extra gravy.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------



I've been tweaking various aspects of this, such as reducing the tomatoes (most recipes call for too much, IMHO), or adding lemon juice, or experimenting with different kinds of chillis. I'd say about a quarter of the time, they're awesome.

SPEAKING of stupidly hot foods, the other day while I was at my favorite Indian spice store, I picked up a little bag of imported white chilli powder. I'd never had it before, but it looked intriguing, and at $2.50 there wasn't much to lose. I have yet to try it in a dish, but when I got it home I opened it and sniffed it, just to see what it smelled like. BIG mistake. It smelled good at some level, but when I sniffed it, it felt like I'd just inhaled fiberglass. I immediately started a sneezing jag that took 20 minutes to totally go away. Even habanero powder doesn't do THAT. I tried looking up white chilli powder on the internet and couldn't find much info on it. It must not get imported often. Maybe the feds consider it a controlled substance.

My spice store also stocks *these* for very cheap:



I can get a huge bag of them for a buck. Not all THAT hot as these things go, but nice. I personally think the red ones have the best flavor.
Posted by: C.J.O'Brien on Nov. 06 2007,14:11

Where do you go for spices, Arden?
Posted by: Arden Chatfield on Nov. 06 2007,14:17

Quote (C.J.O'Brien @ Nov. 06 2007,14:11)
Where do you go for spices, Arden?
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Bombay Spice Store in west Berkeley, California.

Are you local?
Posted by: C.J.O'Brien on Nov. 06 2007,14:30

Yessir. We talked about it once before, remember? We both used to live right by 40th and Telly.

I'm in Emeryville now, on San Pablo.

Bombay... is it on University?
Posted by: Arden Chatfield on Nov. 06 2007,14:38

Quote (C.J.O'Brien @ Nov. 06 2007,14:30)
Yessir. We talked about it once before, remember? We both used to live right by 40th and Telly.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Sorry, I can't always remember *who* I had these conversations with!  :(

 

---------------------QUOTE-------------------
I'm in Emeryville now, on San Pablo.

Bombay... is it on University?
---------------------QUOTE-------------------



Yes. South side of University, 1/2 block west of San Pablo. Should be all of a 3-minute trip for you.
Posted by: stevestory on Nov. 08 2007,19:06

Godalmightly Damn, this is a good beer.


Posted by: Richardthughes on Nov. 08 2007,19:28

just had:


Har Har colonials. better than your rubbish confectionery..
Posted by: carlsonjok on Nov. 08 2007,20:18

Quote (Richardthughes @ Nov. 08 2007,19:28)
just had:


Har Har colonials. better than your rubbish confectionery..
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Coming from a land where boiled meat is considered haute cuisine, it probably has not flavor.  

Now this is candy, you furrner.


Posted by: stevestory on Nov. 10 2007,20:33

Tonight:






Posted by: Richardthughes on Nov. 11 2007,14:33

Just had a bacon and egg butty.

SEXUAL.
Posted by: carlsonjok on Nov. 11 2007,18:39

Tonight:

Archer Farms* Frozen Mediterranean Vegetable Pizza made with Mascarpone cheese, red and yellow peppers, sundried tomatoes, onion, spinach, and pesto. Served with:



* House brand for SuperTarget.
Posted by: Altabin on Nov. 12 2007,10:23

Quote (stevestory @ Nov. 11 2007,03:33)
Tonight:






---------------------QUOTE-------------------


In latest news, steve s. is still in the crapper.
Posted by: stevestory on Nov. 12 2007,19:36

Those are really high-quality burritos. I normally wouldn't buy them for $3 apiece at Harris Teeter, but they're BOGO at the moment, so they're worth it. I'm still waiting on HT to put that awesome lobster bisque back on BOGO. I'm going to buy like 20 lbs of it.



The only libations news at the moment is I've switched from red wine to gin, because I got sick and tired of the vicious hangover two bottles of red wine will give you. I love merlot, and cab sauv, and shiraz, but that headache is just brutal.
Posted by: Lou FCD on Nov. 16 2007,13:42

< Baby back ribs >



---------------------QUOTE-------------------
So Cute You Could Just Eat Them Up

By Benjamin Lester
ScienceNOW Daily News
14 November 2007
Most likely, your mother nurtured you for years and you never worried that when you came home from kindergarten, she'd gobble you up. But many animals do occasionally eat their young, including many that also are attentive parents. New research indicates that, when it comes to deciding whether to chow down on junior, Ma and Pa may be motivated by more than hunger. For example, parents may selectively eat their weaker offspring to favor the stronger ones, an evolutionary model predicts.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Posted by: stevestory on Nov. 16 2007,20:27

Heh. I was waiting in line at some coffeeshop in Chapel Hill, and the day's trivia question was "Complete the sentence: "And I looked, and behold a pale _."" and a girl ahead of me in line said to her friend, "Behold a pale...ale?"
Posted by: stevestory on Nov. 16 2007,20:37

Quote (Altabin @ Nov. 12 2007,11:23)
Quote (stevestory @ Nov. 11 2007,03:33)
Tonight:



---------------------QUOTE-------------------


---------------------QUOTE-------------------


I was raised on milk chocolate and still find it sweet and satisfying. But this dark chocolate, while it took some getting used to, now seems sweet and rich and alluring.
Posted by: stevestory on Nov. 17 2007,21:09

tonight:


Posted by: stevestory on Nov. 17 2007,21:35

and a sammich:

french bread
Moutarde a l'Acienne whole grain mustard
romaine lettuce
cayenne pepper
garlic powder
pepper
turkey
salami
pepperoni
jalapenos!!!!!!!!! woooooohooooooo!!!!!!!!!!!111111
Posted by: stevestory on Nov. 29 2007,20:08

stir fry veggies to which I've added soy sauce, ginger, and enough cayenne pepper to give it a kung-pau kind of kick.
Posted by: stevestory on Dec. 02 2007,21:51

After blowing off a few months, I'm back on a training diet for triathlons. I'm not in bad shape. 6', 230 lbs of mostly muscle. Today I walked 5 miles and hardly noticed it. But I've got to strip off some fat. Lugging 230 lbs through the water is no fun. So the past few weeks, during the weekdays, 1500 cals a day of mostly veggies. Weekends are cheat days. I can do what I want.

Today:
shiraz/cab:

and some saranac pale ale:



yummy.
Posted by: stevestory on Dec. 03 2007,22:13

Date tonight. We went to < India Palace >. Appetizers were papadam and some spinach nan. She had curry chicken, I had chicken vindaloo.

"Mild, medium, or hot, sir?"
"Extra hot."
Posted by: IanBrown_101 on Dec. 03 2007,22:29

Quote (stevestory @ Dec. 04 2007,04:13)
Date tonight. We went to < India Palace >. Appetizers were papadam and some spinach nan. She had curry chicken, I had chicken vindaloo.

"Mild, medium, or hot, sir?"
"Extra hot."
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


See, while it (obviously) varies from place to place, I tend not to like vindaloo. It often doesn't have much in the way of real flavour, just chilli and garlic, and maybe lemon (I like quite complex flavours from my curries, except when it's a white fish curry, when it really should be a clean taste, just some herbs (particularly coriander), coconut milk, green chillis and a touch of garam masalla (just a little bit)).

A nice Madras now, that is always good, but I still vote Dhanksak to be my favourite curry sauce, particularly on prawns.
Posted by: stevestory on Dec. 03 2007,23:34

I like it because it's got a little heat. Ethnic places in america, in my limited experience, really tone down the heat to be more palatable to a wide american audience. I'm almost never satisfied with the heat on a dish. It's not all about the heat, I won't order things like phalls, that's just crazy. But I do have to get things extra hot to get a reasonable heat.

Anyone who spent much time on Hillsborough street in Raleigh, and who remembers Alfie's Caribbean Restaurant on the second floor, that was my favorite place. The jerk chicken had tons of flavor and also would make your scalp sweat just by sniffing it. It was very tasty.
Posted by: Arden Chatfield on Dec. 03 2007,23:46

Quote (stevestory @ Dec. 03 2007,22:13)
Date tonight. We went to < India Palace >. Appetizers were papadam and some spinach nan. She had curry chicken, I had chicken vindaloo.

"Mild, medium, or hot, sir?"
"Extra hot."
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Well? What was the 'extra hot' like?

< Here's > my favorite restaurant anywhere, a first rate little Pakistani dhaba. Very divey place, but everything they make is fabulous. Their tandoori chicken is one of the best smelling things I know of in the world. Also, the best chicken biryanis I've ever had, tho for spice I recommend the karahi chicken.
Posted by: Louis on Dec. 04 2007,04:17

Curry on a date? Bold choice!

You're a very confident chap aren't you, Steve?

Louis
Posted by: carlsonjok on Dec. 04 2007,05:38

Quote (Louis @ Dec. 04 2007,04:17)
Curry on a date? Bold choice!

You're a very confident chap aren't you, Steve?
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Confident that he is going home alone, I'd say.



FWIW, I am a jalfrazi kind of guy. The local Indian joint we favor makes it mild, but the place we dined at in St. Louis kicked it up a notch and I liked it better.
Posted by: stevestory on Dec. 04 2007,18:02

the only fallout from the dinner was that on the way home I spilled a lot of the vindaloo onto my sportscoat, and today I took it to the dry cleaners and from what I can tell from the woman's broken english, there's a good chance they won't clean it. "Big stain. If smell bad they send back." is the best I could get from her.
Posted by: Arden Chatfield on Dec. 04 2007,18:16

Quote (stevestory @ Dec. 04 2007,18:02)
the only fallout from the dinner was that on the way home I spilled a lot of the vindaloo onto my sportscoat, and today I took it to the dry cleaners and from what I can tell from the woman's broken english, there's a good chance they won't clean it. "Big stain. If smell bad they send back." is the best I could get from her.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


You asked for 'extra hot' -- how hot did they make it? Did they crank it down for the white guy?
Posted by: stevestory on Dec. 04 2007,18:18

I think they did crank it down. It was hot. Not too hot, but hot enough. Not as hot as the chili from brueggers i had today.
Posted by: Lou FCD on Dec. 04 2007,20:36



To Whom It May Concern,

I was once like you:

I didn't think a Black & Tan would mix well with Christmas petits fours.  I was as wrong then as you are now.
Posted by: stevestory on Dec. 04 2007,20:59

what's 'a drink'? Because airplane bottles are 50 ml, I assumed 50 ml was a single drink. So this 375ml bottle of gin I've got is about 7 drinks. No big deal. But a friend who's an almanac maniac says a drink is an ounce, or roughly 30 ml of booze. That would make this small bottle about 12 drinks. A big difference. Which is correct?
Posted by: Lou FCD on Dec. 04 2007,21:06

Quote (stevestory @ Dec. 04 2007,21:59)
what's 'a drink'? Because airplane bottles are 50 ml, I assumed 50 ml was a single drink. So this 375ml bottle of gin I've got is about 7 drinks. No big deal. But a friend who's an almanac maniac says a drink is an ounce, or roughly 30 ml of booze. That would make this small bottle about 12 drinks. A big difference. Which is correct?
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Depends on which side of the Atlantic you're currently standing.

< A commenter on one of Dr. BA's recent threads > pointed out the difference in a pint between there and here, a difference which puzzled me when I was in London, but until now hadn't gotten my head around.  I thought those suckers looked a little supersized!

It seems we're about 4 oz short, and truthfully, it makes a big difference at the pub.
Posted by: carlsonjok on Dec. 04 2007,21:08

Quote (stevestory @ Dec. 04 2007,20:59)
what's 'a drink'? Because airplane bottles are 50 ml, I assumed 50 ml was a single drink. So this 375ml bottle of gin I've got is about 7 drinks. No big deal. But a friend who's an almanac maniac says a drink is an ounce, or roughly 30 ml of booze. That would make this small bottle about 12 drinks. A big difference. Which is correct?
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Why do you ask? Are you taking one of those "you might be an alcoholic" quizzes where question 3 is whether you drink more than 9 drinks a day?

EDIT:

Posted by: stevestory on Dec. 06 2007,10:31

lol. no. I'm asking because I'd like to accurately estimate the number of drinks in various form of delivery, the better to choose what to buy depending on the occasion. If you want to merely get tipsy, for instance, you don't want to miscalculate and find yourself roaring drunk.
Posted by: Tracy P. Hamilton on Dec. 06 2007,13:31

Quote (stevestory @ Dec. 06 2007,10:31)
lol. no. I'm asking because I'd like to accurately estimate the number of drinks in various form of delivery, the better to choose what to buy depending on the occasion. If you want to merely get tipsy, for instance, you don't want to miscalculate and find yourself roaring drunk.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


A drink is one 12 fluid ounce (A volume measure, abbreviated fl oz) regular strength beer.  So, 5% times 12 oz is 0.6 fl oz of pure alcohol.

Wine at 15%, to have 0.6 fl oz should be 4 fl. oz in a drink.

Liquor, at 40%, to have 0.6 fl oz should be 1.5 fl. oz.
32 fl. oz = 1 quart = 946 mL, so a drink of usual strength liquor is 44 mL, pretty close to your 50 mL.

This ends the units conversion lesson for the day.

*Edited because I could.  [Nelson Muntz] Ha-Ha! [/Nelson Muntz]
Posted by: carlsonjok on Dec. 07 2007,22:32

Tonight:



Yeah, baby!
Posted by: stevestory on Dec. 12 2007,07:01

an emergency project came up at work last thursday and instead of normal business hours I've been working from late evenings to 6, 7, 8, even 9 am for the past week. Well, it's totally destroyed my drinking schedule. I'm not going to get off at 8 am and have some drinks. Nor am I going to go to sleep, wake up at 5 pm, have a few drinks, and then sober up before working. So I have nothing interesting to report on the booze front.

But on the food front, we're currently noshing on some smoked gouda,



and some Lindt 85% cacao:



and then some Cool Ranch Doritos. After that breakfast of champions, it's off to bed.
Posted by: stevestory on Dec. 12 2007,07:03

The smoked gouda is good. Better by far than the Yancey's smoked cheddar I had this weekend.
Posted by: stevestory on Dec. 12 2007,07:07

A small number of certain types of cheese cause an unpleasant itchiness on my tongue. I haven't studied which types in depth, but IIRC they've tended to issue from some of the stiffer, drier types.

Does anyone know what's going on there?

Edited to add: no, I'm not lactose intolerant.


Posted by: stevestory on Dec. 12 2007,07:15

the overnight work schedule is fine, the only problem is sleeping during the day. There was that dreadful apartment fire at my complex in September, and now heavy machinery lurks about during the day pushing the rubble to and fro.

Some legislator, who I can only assume was also a tax cheat and a child molester, decided that any time a piece of construction equipment is in backwards motion it should activate an air-raid siren. If I ever meet the man responsible for this regulation I will hunt down the nearest cord and garrote him until he is stone dead.
Posted by: Lou FCD on Dec. 12 2007,07:15

Quote (stevestory @ Dec. 12 2007,08:01)
an emergency project came up at work last thursday and instead of normal business hours I've been working from late evenings to 6, 7, 8, even 9 am for the past week. Well, it's totally destroyed my drinking schedule. I'm not going to get off at 8 am and have some drinks. Nor am I going to go to sleep, wake up at 5 pm, have a few drinks, and then sober up before working. So I have nothing interesting to report on the booze front.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Holy Crap, is nothing sacred anymore?

A job should NEVER interfere with alcohol consumption, and should in fact CAUSE alcohol consumption.  It's a law, I think.  Federal, maybe.  Call OSHA.
Posted by: stevestory on Dec. 12 2007,07:30

Office of Sleeping off HAngovers?
Posted by: stevestory on Dec. 12 2007,07:36

Quote (carlsonjok @ Dec. 04 2007,06:38)
Quote (Louis @ Dec. 04 2007,04:17)
Curry on a date? Bold choice!

You're a very confident chap aren't you, Steve?
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Confident that he is going home alone, I'd say.



FWIW, I am a jalfrazi kind of guy. The local Indian joint we favor makes it mild, but the place we dined at in St. Louis kicked it up a notch and I liked it better.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


I was confident. But, while the date went fine that day, the situation went to hell shortly thereafter. For unspecified emotional reasons. I live in Chapel Hill, so on the plus side, I date 20-year-olds, but on the negative side, I date 20-year-olds.
Posted by: Richard Simons on Dec. 12 2007,08:56

Quote (Tracy P. Hamilton @ Dec. 06 2007,13:31)
32 fl. oz = 1 quart = 946 mL, so a drink of usual strength liquor is 44 mL, pretty close to your 50 mL.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Only in the US system. In the UK it is 40 fluid ounces to a quart.

I've just been trying to explain the UK/US system to a group of Canadian adults who are only familiar with litres. The US system is even crazier than the UK system, with different sizes of barrels and quarts depending on what is in them, tons that are noticably smaller than metric tonnes, grain that is measured in bushels but converted to tons using different conversion factors for each crop and so on.

After that, I really feel in need of a soothing drink. . .
Posted by: Arden Chatfield on Dec. 12 2007,09:35



---------------------QUOTE-------------------
I date 20-year-olds.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------



I bet Steve meets them by offering to buy them beer.  :p
Posted by: Tracy P. Hamilton on Dec. 12 2007,10:45

Quote (Richard Simons @ Dec. 12 2007,08:56)
Quote (Tracy P. Hamilton @ Dec. 06 2007,13:31)
32 fl. oz = 1 quart = 946 mL, so a drink of usual strength liquor is 44 mL, pretty close to your 50 mL.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Only in the US system. In the UK it is 40 fluid ounces to a quart.

I've just been trying to explain the UK/US system to a group of Canadian adults who are only familiar with litres. The US system is even crazier than the UK system, with different sizes of barrels and quarts depending on what is in them, tons that are noticably smaller than metric tonnes, grain that is measured in bushels but converted to tons using different conversion factors for each crop and so on.

After that, I really feel in need of a soothing drink. . .
---------------------QUOTE-------------------



A note for those used to a UK pint being 20 fl. oz:  what many US bars call the "pint" glass is really a 13 oz "standard" glass.
Posted by: khan on Dec. 12 2007,16:23

Quote (Lou FCD @ Dec. 12 2007,08:15)
Quote (stevestory @ Dec. 12 2007,08:01)
an emergency project came up at work last thursday and instead of normal business hours I've been working from late evenings to 6, 7, 8, even 9 am for the past week. Well, it's totally destroyed my drinking schedule. I'm not going to get off at 8 am and have some drinks. Nor am I going to go to sleep, wake up at 5 pm, have a few drinks, and then sober up before working. So I have nothing interesting to report on the booze front.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Holy Crap, is nothing sacred anymore?

A job should NEVER interfere with alcohol consumption, and should in fact CAUSE alcohol consumption.  It's a law, I think.  Federal, maybe.  Call OSHA.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


"Work is the curse of the drinking class."
Posted by: Lou FCD on Dec. 12 2007,16:32

Quote (stevestory @ Dec. 12 2007,08:36)
I was confident. But, while the date went fine that day, the situation went to hell shortly thereafter. For unspecified emotional reasons. I live in Chapel Hill, so on the plus side, I date 20-year-olds, but on the negative side, I date 20-year-olds.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


I'm feelin' your pain, Steve.
Posted by: Lou FCD on Dec. 12 2007,16:33

Quote (khan @ Dec. 12 2007,17:23)
"Work is the curse of the drinking class."
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


"Work is the cause of the drinking class" as well.
Posted by: stevestory on Dec. 12 2007,16:45

Quote (Lou FCD @ Dec. 12 2007,17:32)
Quote (stevestory @ Dec. 12 2007,08:36)
I was confident. But, while the date went fine that day, the situation went to hell shortly thereafter. For unspecified emotional reasons. I live in Chapel Hill, so on the plus side, I date 20-year-olds, but on the negative side, I date 20-year-olds.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


I'm feelin' your pain, Steve.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Ha ha. Seriously, though. 20 year olds are hot and all, but everyone knows women are at their best around age 35.
Posted by: Lou FCD on Dec. 12 2007,16:54

Quote (stevestory @ Dec. 12 2007,17:45)
Quote (Lou FCD @ Dec. 12 2007,17:32)
 
Quote (stevestory @ Dec. 12 2007,08:36)
I was confident. But, while the date went fine that day, the situation went to hell shortly thereafter. For unspecified emotional reasons. I live in Chapel Hill, so on the plus side, I date 20-year-olds, but on the negative side, I date 20-year-olds.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


I'm feelin' your pain, Steve.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Ha ha. Seriously, though. 20 year olds are hot and all, but everyone knows women are at their best around age 35.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Oh, I was totally (Ok, mostly) serious.  I was going to Marshall, living just off campus, and working in a bar just across the street from the stadium while I was divorced.

I. am. totally. there.

(It was fun while it lasted, though!)


Posted by: stevestory on Dec. 15 2007,19:28

For the party tonight:

hot wings, sierra nevada pale ale, lox on french bread, and, if serious drinking breaks out, gin and cranberry juice.


Posted by: stevestory on Dec. 15 2007,19:38

Quote (Arden Chatfield @ Dec. 12 2007,10:35)


---------------------QUOTE-------------------
I date 20-year-olds.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------



I bet Steve meets them by offering to buy them beer.  :p
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


It's very easy to meet people. Just go to a coffeeshop and be sociable. Or go to Meetups or book discussions. Or speed dating. It's easy to meet a bunch of people. The problem is unmeeting them when you've met the wrong one. As far as drinking with the underaged, it can be done, but you have to know the right bartender. I'm not trying to meet 20-year-olds, it's just that Chapel Hill is stuffed to the gills with them. It's refreshing to meet someone who's a grad student or young professional.
Posted by: stevestory on Dec. 15 2007,19:47

Quote (stevestory @ Dec. 15 2007,20:38)
The problem is unmeeting them when you've met the wrong one.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


I like good coffee, and in Chapel Hill / Carrboro that means Open Eye, Starbucks, Caribou, Driade and 3 Cups. I had to stop going to  one of them for a while because this guy, let's call him Vance, was the wrong kind of person to have met. Real time-wasting moron. You'd go, get some coffee, have a smoke, and before you knew it Vance was sitting at your table explaining how the big businesses keep the vaccine for AIDS supressed so they can make money off the treatments, or how Hitler's inspiration was Christopher Columbus, or the local government was doing experiments on his brain against his will, etc etc etc.
Posted by: IanBrown_101 on Dec. 15 2007,20:24

Quote (Tracy P. Hamilton @ Dec. 12 2007,16:45)
Quote (Richard Simons @ Dec. 12 2007,08:56)
 
Quote (Tracy P. Hamilton @ Dec. 06 2007,13:31)
32 fl. oz = 1 quart = 946 mL, so a drink of usual strength liquor is 44 mL, pretty close to your 50 mL.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Only in the US system. In the UK it is 40 fluid ounces to a quart.

I've just been trying to explain the UK/US system to a group of Canadian adults who are only familiar with litres. The US system is even crazier than the UK system, with different sizes of barrels and quarts depending on what is in them, tons that are noticably smaller than metric tonnes, grain that is measured in bushels but converted to tons using different conversion factors for each crop and so on.

After that, I really feel in need of a soothing drink. . .
---------------------QUOTE-------------------



A note for those used to a UK pint being 20 fl. oz:  what many US bars call the "pint" glass is really a 13 oz "standard" glass.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


So, not only is your beer terrible, you actually get LESS of it?

Ouch, how do you people cope?
Posted by: IanBrown_101 on Dec. 15 2007,20:25

Quote (stevestory @ Dec. 16 2007,01:38)
Quote (Arden Chatfield @ Dec. 12 2007,10:35)


---------------------QUOTE-------------------
I date 20-year-olds.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------



I bet Steve meets them by offering to buy them beer.  :p
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


It's very easy to meet people. Just go to a coffeeshop and be sociable. Or go to Meetups or book discussions. Or speed dating. It's easy to meet a bunch of people. The problem is unmeeting them when you've met the wrong one. As far as drinking with the underaged, it can be done, but you have to know the right bartender. I'm not trying to meet 20-year-olds, it's just that Chapel Hill is stuffed to the gills with them. It's refreshing to meet someone who's a grad student or young professional.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Are you sure we shouldn't call him AFDave?
Posted by: carlsonjok on Dec. 15 2007,20:29

Quote (stevestory @ Dec. 15 2007,19:38)
Quote (Arden Chatfield @ Dec. 12 2007,10:35)


---------------------QUOTE-------------------
I date 20-year-olds.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------



I bet Steve meets them by offering to buy them beer.  :p
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


It's very easy to meet people. Just go to a coffeeshop and be sociable. Or go to Meetups or book discussions. Or speed dating. It's easy to meet a bunch of people. The problem is unmeeting them when you've met the wrong one. As far as drinking with the underaged, it can be done, but you have to know the right bartender. I'm not trying to meet 20-year-olds, it's just that Chapel Hill is stuffed to the gills with them. It's refreshing to meet someone who's a grad student or young professional.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Wow. You really have dated some losers. I'm guessing you didn't use the old "Let's just be friends line" on that one.
Posted by: stevestory on Dec. 16 2007,00:01

That one? You mean Vance? That wasn't a date. I'm heterosexual.
Posted by: Arden Chatfield on Dec. 16 2007,00:20

Quote (IanBrown_101 @ Dec. 15 2007,20:24)
 
Quote (Tracy P. Hamilton @ Dec. 12 2007,16:45)
 
Quote (Richard Simons @ Dec. 12 2007,08:56)
   
Quote (Tracy P. Hamilton @ Dec. 06 2007,13:31)
32 fl. oz = 1 quart = 946 mL, so a drink of usual strength liquor is 44 mL, pretty close to your 50 mL.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Only in the US system. In the UK it is 40 fluid ounces to a quart.

I've just been trying to explain the UK/US system to a group of Canadian adults who are only familiar with litres. The US system is even crazier than the UK system, with different sizes of barrels and quarts depending on what is in them, tons that are noticably smaller than metric tonnes, grain that is measured in bushels but converted to tons using different conversion factors for each crop and so on.

After that, I really feel in need of a soothing drink. . .
---------------------QUOTE-------------------



A note for those used to a UK pint being 20 fl. oz:  what many US bars call the "pint" glass is really a 13 oz "standard" glass.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


So, not only is your beer terrible, you actually get LESS of it?

Ouch, how do you people cope?
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Wait, if it's bad beer, you'd want more???
Posted by: IanBrown_101 on Dec. 16 2007,11:44

Quote (Arden Chatfield @ Dec. 16 2007,06:20)
Quote (IanBrown_101 @ Dec. 15 2007,20:24)
 
Quote (Tracy P. Hamilton @ Dec. 12 2007,16:45)
   
Quote (Richard Simons @ Dec. 12 2007,08:56)
     
Quote (Tracy P. Hamilton @ Dec. 06 2007,13:31)
32 fl. oz = 1 quart = 946 mL, so a drink of usual strength liquor is 44 mL, pretty close to your 50 mL.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Only in the US system. In the UK it is 40 fluid ounces to a quart.

I've just been trying to explain the UK/US system to a group of Canadian adults who are only familiar with litres. The US system is even crazier than the UK system, with different sizes of barrels and quarts depending on what is in them, tons that are noticably smaller than metric tonnes, grain that is measured in bushels but converted to tons using different conversion factors for each crop and so on.

After that, I really feel in need of a soothing drink. . .
---------------------QUOTE-------------------



A note for those used to a UK pint being 20 fl. oz:  what many US bars call the "pint" glass is really a 13 oz "standard" glass.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


So, not only is your beer terrible, you actually get LESS of it?

Ouch, how do you people cope?
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Wait, if it's bad beer, you'd want more???
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


you would get drunk cheaper and quicker, so you would forget it was bad.

But no, those things are both just...wrong. A pint should be a pint, not something less just because you don't "do" imperial measures.
Posted by: stevestory on Dec. 16 2007,19:03

tonight's omelette recipe:

4 eggs
1/2 cup milk
1/2 cup shredded mozarella
sauteed onions
chopped up bacon
basil
oregano
butter
salt
pepper
Posted by: stevestory on Dec. 19 2007,10:55

tonight: drinking at < The Cellar >
Posted by: stevestory on Dec. 20 2007,19:17

finally had some of this tonight



yummy. It cost as much as the burger, but it was just as good.
Posted by: Richardthughes on Dec. 20 2007,19:20

I just had KFC.

The highpoint:



Check out Leffe Blonde, Steve.
Posted by: carlsonjok on Dec. 20 2007,19:51

Tonight:



Not in the same class as Sierra Nevada. But, at $4.75 a six, the price is right.  J.W.Dundee is the craft brewery associated with Genesee Beer, a regional (Western New York) equivalent to Bud, Miller, et al.
Posted by: Lou FCD on Dec. 20 2007,20:09

I'm trying to write a bit on JanieBelle's novel tonight, but the words are just not coming.

I think I need a little something to loosen the brain.  Details after I check the wine cabinet...

ETA:



2002

My first go round with this one.  Likin' it.

ETAA:  Whoops.  dun overdididit.  *note to self - wine is not water - drink responsibly.* /psa


Posted by: stevestory on Dec. 21 2007,21:33

tonight: minestrone from a can.

not bad.

and maybe a few of these:


Posted by: Alan Fox on Dec. 22 2007,16:59



For Bob O'H (though they slightly misspelled vittu)

And the wine is quite good, too!

PS thanks for the plug.
Posted by: Assassinator on Dec. 22 2007,18:13

I only want this really:

Even though I'm legal to drink and most of my mates, wich are my age, like to indulge themselfs sometimes in alcohol I never do that. Just gimme some good ol' Lipton Ice, lemon ofcourse :D
Posted by: Albatrossity2 on Dec. 23 2007,18:17

Tonight's repast - Salad, French Onion Soup (from < this recipe), >topped with homemade French bread, and accompanied by a nice fat Zinfandel



It sure is good to have the < kitchen remodeling > completed!
Posted by: Richardthughes on Dec. 23 2007,18:57

Lovely kitchen, Dave!
Posted by: carlsonjok on Dec. 23 2007,18:57

Quote (Albatrossity2 @ Dec. 23 2007,18:17)
It sure is good to have the < kitchen remodeling > completed!
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Awesome looking kitchen.  As for myself tonight:

While cooking: Samuel Adams Scotch Ale.

Then for dinner: pork filet with caper sauce and a nice romaine salad, with:

Posted by: Richardthughes on Dec. 23 2007,18:59

Quote (carlsonjok @ Dec. 23 2007,18:57)
While cooking:

---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Cock au Cock au Chen?

We'll get take out when I visit.
Posted by: carlsonjok on Dec. 23 2007,19:01

Quote (Richardthughes @ Dec. 23 2007,18:59)
 
Quote (carlsonjok @ Dec. 23 2007,18:57)
While cooking:

Imaged editted to minimize the humilation.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Cock au Cock au Chen?

We'll get take out when I visit.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Crap. I cleared my cache and double checked only to find the problem. I editted the post as quick as I could, but you were faster.  

*shakes fist*
Posted by: Richardthughes on Dec. 23 2007,19:03

I THINK THAT SHUD BE YOU'RE kNEW AVATAR, HORSE-BOY.




PS





HOMO.
Posted by: carlsonjok on Dec. 23 2007,19:06

Quote (Richardthughes @ Dec. 23 2007,19:03)
I THINK THAT SHUD BE YOU'RE NEW AVATAR, HORSE-BOY.




PS





HOMO.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Don't make me call Homeland Security, you furrner!
Posted by: Richardthughes on Dec. 23 2007,19:09

DONT MAKE ME CALL HOMO-LAND SCRUTINY, MR HORSES AND DOGGIES ON BOY CHICKENS.
Posted by: carlsonjok on Dec. 23 2007,19:20

Quote (Richardthughes @ Dec. 23 2007,19:09)
DONT MAKE ME CALL HOMO-LAND SCRUTINY, MR HORSES AND DOGGIES ON BOY CHICKENS.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


*tries to think of some witty retort*























*shakes fist again*
Posted by: Albatrossity2 on Dec. 23 2007,20:21

Dang. By the time I get my soup and bread put away, chaos breaks out here. Sounds like I missed something entertaining; fist-shaking and all that!

Any clues?
Posted by: Richardthughes on Dec. 23 2007,20:25

Quote (Albatrossity2 @ Dec. 23 2007,20:21)
Dang. By the time I get my soup and bread put away, chaos breaks out here. Sounds like I missed something entertaining; fist-shaking and all that!

Any clues?
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


I'll let Carlsonjok tell his tale..
Posted by: carlsonjok on Dec. 23 2007,20:52

Quote (Richardthughes @ Dec. 23 2007,20:25)
 
Quote (Albatrossity2 @ Dec. 23 2007,20:21)
Dang. By the time I get my soup and bread put away, chaos breaks out here. Sounds like I missed something entertaining; fist-shaking and all that!

Any clues?
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


I'll let Carlsonjok tell his tale..
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Suffice it to say that RTH has preserved the evidence of my humilation, despite my fevered efforts to erase it.  At this point, all I have left is macho posturing to recover what little is left of my dignity.  

And, sadly, my chainsaw is in the shop.  It is bad enough that I have to saw all the branchs and limbs damaged in the recent icestorm by hand.  But, to add insult to injury, I have to menace RTH without the benefit of fossil fuel powered tools.


Posted by: Richardthughes on Dec. 23 2007,21:02

His original linked picture is in a quote up there ^ somewhere.

Ouch.
Posted by: Bob O'H on Dec. 24 2007,00:31

Quote (Alan Fox @ Dec. 22 2007,16:59)


For Bob O'H (though they slightly misspelled vittu)

And the wine is quite good, too!

PS thanks for the plug.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Aaah, thanks for that Alan.  I guess it doesn't taste like cat's piss.

And have a merry Christmas!
Posted by: Albatrossity2 on Dec. 24 2007,06:39

Quote (Richardthughes @ Dec. 23 2007,21:02)
His original linked picture is in a quote up there ^ somewhere.

Ouch.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Hmmm. Doesn't look like any Scotch Ale I've ever tried.

Are you sure that isn't one of Louis' pictures from his holiday in India?
Posted by: Lou FCD on Dec. 24 2007,18:33

Sippin' on the remainder of the bottle mentioned above, with home-made cookies, pumpkin spice bread, banana nut bread, after having a big dinner at my cousin's house (two blocks from here).

Life doesn't suck.

Missin' < my Aunt Helen >, however.


Posted by: Richardthughes on Dec. 24 2007,21:02

Quote (Lou FCD @ Dec. 24 2007,18:33)
Sippin' on the remainder of the bottle mentioned above, with home-made cookies, pumpkin spice bread, banana nut bread, after having a big dinner at my cousin's house (two blocks from here).

Life doesn't suck.

Missin' < my Aunt Helen >, however.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Sorry for your loss, Lou. She sounds quite a broad!
Posted by: Lou FCD on Dec. 25 2007,00:28

She really was, Rich.

The story at UDoJ about her saving Thanksgiving last year was true, btw.  

Walking over to Aunt Helen's (less than a hundred yards I think, so mostly doable for me) for dinner and wine or pizza and beer was one of life's little pleasures that I shall sorely miss.
Posted by: carlsonjok on Dec. 25 2007,13:34

A good day.

The turkey is ready to go into the smoker (apple wood, if you must know), the sage dressing is ready to go into the oven, < Christmas Story > is on the TV, and a bottle of 2003 Montelle Cynthiana Port has been finished.

Does it get any better than this?

Well, given that there is a Casillero del Diablo Sauvignon Blanc, a Hogue Late Harvest Reisling, a 2002 Lakewood Pinot Noir, a 2006 Wine by Joe (Oregon) Pinot Noir, and a assortment of Samuel Adams beers waiting, I am guessing that, yes, it does get better.

A Merry Christmas and Happy Hangover to all!
Posted by: Richardthughes on Dec. 25 2007,17:39

Quote (carlsonjok @ Dec. 25 2007,13:34)
A good day.

The turkey is ready to go into the smoker (apple wood, if you must know), the sage dressing is ready to go into the oven, < Christmas Story > is on the TV, and a bottle of 2003 Montelle Cynthiana Port has been finished.

Does it get any better than this?

Well, given that there is a Casillero del Diablo Sauvignon Blanc, a Hogue Late Harvest Reisling, a 2002 Lakewood Pinot Noir, a 2006 Wine by Joe (Oregon) Pinot Noir, and a assortment of Samuel Adams beers waiting, I am guessing that, yes, it does get better.

A Merry Christmas and Happy Hangover to all!
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Are you going down the dog and duck later?   ;)
Posted by: stevestory on Dec. 26 2007,18:23

tonight's appetizers are Yancey's Fancy Jalapeno and Habanero cheese on triscuits.

And since I'm not working tomorrow, libations are a chianti, a Newcastle brown ale, and some sam adams cream stout.
Posted by: Alan Fox on Dec. 27 2007,09:03

Just back from the Cap de Creus. If anyone is around north-east Spain, try not to miss Dali's house. It is simultaneously exotic and rustic, standing in his studio looking at his armchair from which he painted surrounded by his bric-a-brac was quite moving.

Afterwards stopped for lunch at a little restaurant by the lighthouse on the headland. Tapas of thin sliced smoked duck breast and anchovies on tostados followed by a fresh-caught whole sea bass picked out from the day's catch and baked on a bed of sliced potato, tomato, onion, garlic and white wine. Washed down with a local white "picapoll" wine. Heaven.
Posted by: stevestory on Dec. 27 2007,21:31

the jalapeno and habanero cheese was just too f'ing hot. not good.

tonight: Fungus Amungus Burger at < The Spotted Dog >. Yummy. And some Red something ale. Red Oak? I don't recall. But it was tasty.
Posted by: Lou FCD on Dec. 27 2007,21:52

I have friends in from Philly for the week.

They brought Tastycakes and stuff to make cheesesteaks, including Amoroso rolls and sweet peppers, which are apparently unknown down here.  Washed it down with Yuengling.

A little bit of South Philly.  Cheesesteaks.  mmmmm...

I forgot to ask for shoo-fly pie, though.

:(
Posted by: stevestory on Dec. 29 2007,20:20


skoal peach.

yummy
Posted by: someotherguy on Dec. 29 2007,20:26

Had some of this--specifically, the Premiere--last night:



Fantastic, as always.
Posted by: carlsonjok on Dec. 30 2007,19:28

Tonight:  Steaks on the grill, mashed potatoes, and turnip greens.  With an inexpensive (relatively speaking at $19 a bottle) Oregon Pinot Noir.


Posted by: Richardthughes on Dec. 30 2007,19:31

Quote (stevestory @ Dec. 29 2007,20:20)

skoal peach.

yummy
---------------------QUOTE-------------------



Posted by: stevestory on Dec. 30 2007,19:59

Quote (Richardthughes @ Dec. 30 2007,20:31)
Quote (stevestory @ Dec. 29 2007,20:20)

skoal peach.

yummy
---------------------QUOTE-------------------



---------------------QUOTE-------------------


yeah? what brand you chew?
Posted by: Richardthughes on Dec. 30 2007,20:07

Quote (stevestory @ Dec. 30 2007,19:59)
yeah? what brand you chew?
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Flufflybunny kiwi-raspberry.
Posted by: Erasmus, FCD on Dec. 30 2007,20:13



peach huh.  the little old ladies down the street at the episcopal church dip that stuff.

This holiday break has been an homage and tribute to the One True King.


I can has Budweiser?
Posted by: Richardthughes on Dec. 30 2007,20:15

Quote (Erasmus @ FCD,Dec. 30 2007,20:13)
I can has Budweiser?
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


I MADE U A CAEK.



I HOPE U LIEK IT.
Posted by: Arden Chatfield on Dec. 30 2007,21:23

Quote (stevestory @ Dec. 30 2007,19:59)
 
Quote (Richardthughes @ Dec. 30 2007,20:31)
 
Quote (stevestory @ Dec. 29 2007,20:20)

skoal peach.

yummy
---------------------QUOTE-------------------



---------------------QUOTE-------------------


yeah? what brand you chew?
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


I chew broken glass and beef jerky, like any heterosexual. Tho you guys wouldn't know anything about that.

:angry:  :angry:
Posted by: stevestory on Dec. 30 2007,21:54

< exercise can reverse the brain damage from alcohol >.

If my calculations are correct, 496 marathons and I'll be back to good...

:p
Posted by: argystokes on Dec. 30 2007,22:15

Sometimes I cook by throwing ingredients into a pan and seeing how it turns out. I think I have about a 75% success rate on decent tasting food. Tonight's one-pan special:

Some water
2 eggs
about a cuppa flour
table spoon corn starch
half bag o frozen carrots, corn, peas
some chicken strips
a layer of taco seasoning
some garlic
some creole seasoning
bit of allspice

Mix well, toss into skillet at medium heat. Stir irregularly.

Damn, wish I had some pepper jack to put on top at the end.
Posted by: Erasmus, FCD on Dec. 30 2007,22:21

Now eating:

Allium tricoccum.

yummmmmmmmmmmmm!!!
Posted by: stevestory on Dec. 30 2007,22:26

Allspice is pretty bangin' on jerk chicken. Which I should make tomorrow, come to think of it. A girl friend got me a half-gallon growler of< Santa's Secret from Carolina Brewery >the other day, which includes, among other things, allspice. It was pretty good.
Posted by: Arden Chatfield on Dec. 30 2007,22:57

Quote (stevestory @ Dec. 30 2007,22:26)
Allspice is pretty bangin' on jerk chicken. Which I should make tomorrow, come to think of it. A girl friend got me a half-gallon growler of< Santa's Secret from Carolina Brewery >the other day, which includes, among other things, allspice. It was pretty good.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


I thought allspice was pretty much mandatory in jerk chicken...?

Anyway, chili tonight:

1lb Anasazi < beans > (cook fast, sweet flavor)
5 tablespoons Ancho chili powder
3-4 tablespoons cumin
2 tablespoons coriander
2 tablespoons Bengali white chili powder
one half a tomato, pureed
1 half a big yaller onion, shredded
1lb hamburger

I had to tone down the heat this time 'cuz last time I put in a tablespoon of habanero powder and it was too hot for the wife and daughter.  :(

Most of the scoville units this time came from the white chili powder, not the ancho powder, which has a wine-like flavor, but not much heat.

Still, it came out pretty good. Happily, it didn't come out mushy like last time. The beans kept their consistency.

Also, I cut down on the tomatoes 'cuz last time there was too much and the tomato flavor sort of swamped it.
Posted by: stevestory on Dec. 30 2007,23:11

Quote (Arden Chatfield @ Dec. 30 2007,23:57)
I thought allspice was pretty much mandatory in jerk chicken...?
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Of course. My wording was a little weird. The two indispensable ingredients for jerk chicken are allspice and savage heat. I also add the common ingredients cinnamon, cloves, nutmeg, and garlic.
Posted by: stevestory on Dec. 30 2007,23:13

anasazi beans, huh? never had them. I always use black beans.
Posted by: Arden Chatfield on Dec. 31 2007,00:07

Quote (stevestory @ Dec. 30 2007,23:13)
anasazi beans, huh? never had them. I always use black beans.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


(Actually, out here one usually sees chili made with either pintos or red beans.)

It also depends on whether you're using dried beans or canned beans. When I was a poverty-stricken grad student, I was a purist and always used dried beans (VERY cheap), but the downside to that is that they take so long to cook they tend to end up mushy. Cooking dried black beans is especially draggy in that they take fucking forever to cook, especially if the beans are a little old. Really old dried black beans can turn mushy BEFORE they fully cook -- mushy and crunchy at the same time, if you can imagine that. Pretty awful. Pintos cook a lot faster, and boiling dried pintos give off a really nice smell for the first hour or so.

Nevertheless, I switched to canned beans 10 years ago, because they cook a LOT faster and they only go mushy if you overcook them. I never even tried to use dried beans again til my sister told me about anasazi beans. Even dried, they only take like 30-45 minutes of rapid boiling to cook (and I've never seen them canned), so they don't turn mushy. Tastewise, they're kind of like a cross between pintos and red beans, but a little sweeter. Pretty nice. Health food stores with big bean/grain sections often have them, tho they're not that common outside Arizona.
Posted by: stevestory on Jan. 01 2008,00:57

Ugh. New Year's Eve at Jack Spratt in Chapel Hill. Top Shelf vodka for everyone. Best wishes everyone.
Posted by: argystokes on Jan. 01 2008,03:39

Quote (stevestory @ Dec. 31 2007,22:57)
Ugh. New Year's Eve at Jack Spratt in Chapel Hill. Top Shelf vodka for everyone. Best wishes everyone.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


woooooooooooooooo libations!
Posted by: stevestory on Jan. 01 2008,20:54

that was a hangover. Yikes. Taking it easy tonight with some of this



and some of this



simply delectable.
Posted by: Darth Robo on Jan. 03 2008,09:10

I drank more on xmas day then new years eve so why is it I had the nastier hangover on new year's day?   :(
Posted by: stevestory on Jan. 07 2008,21:32

tonight:



...at some point. Too frickin' busy to get my drank on all day.
Posted by: stevestory on Jan. 07 2008,21:34

Quote (Darth Robo @ Jan. 03 2008,10:10)
I drank more on xmas day then new years eve so why is it I had the nastier hangover on new year's day?   :(
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Depends on all kinds of factors. If you were more hydrated you might have less of a hangover. And different beverages have different consequences.
Posted by: stevestory on Jan. 07 2008,21:36

There's a dish at the local chinese restaurant called Scallion Chicken. It's spicy and yummy. Anybody know how to make this? I see a variety of recipes on the internet and am not sure which to try.
Posted by: carlsonjok on Jan. 19 2008,18:58

Bump.

Tonight:  Pork Ribs marinaded in honey and rubbed with a delightful mixture of sea salt, brown sugar, garlic, onion, ancho powder, coriander, chipotle powder, paprika, allspice, and cloves, and smoked over hickory.  Accompanied by several selections from a Boulevard Brewing sampler pack!
Posted by: Assassinator on Jan. 20 2008,07:24

Carlson...you just made me hate you, a lot actually. Sunday is dad-cooking day, he'll try to brew something again out of all the crap left in the fridge, freezer and places like that....yay....
Posted by: stevestory on Jan. 25 2008,22:30

For the party tonight: Mattie's Perch shiraz, Casillero del Diablo Riesling, and some Hornsby's Hard Cider.







That's for everybody else. Me, I'll be drinking my new fave, the cuba libre.




Posted by: improvius on Jan. 28 2008,14:55

I had been trying to get more into wine over the past 5 years, but I seem to be developing some sort of allergy.  I had an allergic reaction a few years ago in the form of an itchy tongue followed by a swollen throat after I tried a particular Riesling.  After about a year, these reactions were coming more and more frequently, so I pretty much gave up on grape wine.

Fortunately, my wife and I have always been very much into Japanese culture, so we started trying different sakes.  The selection here in Rochester is abysmal, so on a recent trip to Vegas we made a point to sample as many different sakes as we could.  And we recently discovered a liquor store in Buffalo that has a decent selection on the shelves.

If anyone is interested in trying out some good sake, here are some of our current favorites:

Rihaku "Wandering Poet"
It's a highly-polished (junmai ginjo) sake with a full and smooth flavor.  It's often described as a more "traditional" sake.  I consider this a very well-rounded sake.  It's a great place to start if you're interested in sake, and an absolute  must-try if you are already a sake fan.

Kamoizumi "Summer Snow" Nigori Ginjo
This has a very rich flavor with being especially sweet.  "Nigori" sake contains unfiltered rice particles which need to be shaken up immediately before you drink it.  The result is a milky texture.  Many nigoris end up being (in my opinion) overly sweet - almost to the point of dessert wines.  But the "Summer Snow" doesn't go that route.  I could drink this stuff all day long.

Masumi Okuden Kantsukuri "Mirror of Truth" Junmai
Smooth, smooth, smooth.  This is one of the cleanest sakes I've tried so far.  The texture is very clear, and there's just a hint of rice flavor in this.  The finish is fairly mild, too.  It's almost like drinking water.  Very enjoyable.
Posted by: Richardthughes on Jan. 28 2008,16:47

It's a chain, but I was impressed:

< http://www.elephantbar.com/ >
Posted by: stevestory on Mar. 26 2008,00:01

mmmmm gorgonzola cheese. Very stinky, but very good.

also lots of this


Posted by: Dr.GH on Mar. 26 2008,02:09

I am on a light beer diet.  Heineken light isn't that bad.  But real beer is so much better.  I have 8 bottles of Ancher Steam Pale Ale tucked away.  (3? there are only 3 left)!
Posted by: stevestory on April 26 2008,01:28

highlights from the last few weeks:

< chorizo burritos with black beans >

gorgonzola

Andouille
alt and copperline
and Burnett's

that about sums it up.


Posted by: stevestory on April 26 2008,01:31

and just to be comprehensive




Posted by: Albatrossity2 on April 28 2008,17:20

Even though we have had nights that should have been too cool for mushroom development, we ventured out yesterday to hunt for morels. We didn't find a lot of them, but had better luck than I honestly expected. Here's the batch, with the requisite Swiss Army knife for scale.


And here's the outcome, a recipe we call "yard pie", made with morels, dandelion greens, dandelion blossoms, and a single shitake mushroom from one of our two shitake logs. Accompanied by a Titan IPA, it was delicious (and mostly locally grown). Recipe available upon request, but you have to get or grow your own mushrooms...


Posted by: stevestory on April 28 2008,22:38

I just moved into a sweet new place in Carrboro, off Davie rd. This place has a nice little garden in the back and my roommate, also a spicy-food aficionado, is looking to plant a bunch of peppers soon. But what kinds will grow here? I turn to the wisdom of the crowd. For this kind of climate, what sort of peppers should we plant?
Posted by: stevestory on May 11 2008,14:26

the whole training week was stressful. Eating right, doing hundreds of laps at Bowman Gray, etc. So weekend days are free-for-alls. I just woke up from Friday night.

Vague memories:







ugh what the hell is going on.
Posted by: rhmc on May 11 2008,14:52

Quote (stevestory @ April 28 2008,23:38)
I just moved into a sweet new place in Carrboro, off Davie rd. This place has a nice little garden in the back and my roommate, also a spicy-food aficionado, is looking to plant a bunch of peppers soon. But what kinds will grow here? I turn to the wisdom of the crowd. For this kind of climate, what sort of peppers should we plant?
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


what part of the world do you inhabit?
and how many hours of sun does your growing area get?
peppers will grow just about anywhere if they get several hours of sun...
i've got habenero, jalopeno, hot banana, several types of chili, tobasco and a variety of bells...
Posted by: stevestory on May 11 2008,15:01

Quote (rhmc @ May 11 2008,15:52)
what part of the world do you inhabit?
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Is there a Carrboro, Afghanistan? NC, MF.
Posted by: rhmc on May 11 2008,15:24

Quote (stevestory @ May 11 2008,16:01)
Quote (rhmc @ May 11 2008,15:52)
what part of the world do you inhabit?
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Is there a Carrboro, Afghanistan? NC, MF.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


don't blame that on me.
you could always move.  :)
Posted by: Dr.GH on May 11 2008,16:13

My dearly beloved wife brought me a bottle of Macallan Elegancia, or as the lable has it THE MACALLAN.

Lovely, but now it is all gone and I have no more.

I was on the morning fishing boat today and brought home about 30LBs of bonito which is curing in a salt/sugar mix getting ready for the smoker.  They were all large fish, so I'll give them 2 days to soak.  I plan to use mesquite+oak+white sage for the smoke. The oak I have is from old Jack Daniels barrels.  It is a gimmick really, they are not any better than any other oak.

I had a bit already as shashimi.  Very tasty.  There were literally acres of 10 to 18 LB fish, so I think I'll be out again in a few days.
Posted by: Nerull on May 11 2008,16:41

We've grown habaneros quite successfully here in southern Indiana. Each plant will produce massive numbers of peppers, and keep doing so until it starts to get too cold. You pick them, more grow, etc, etc.
Posted by: Louis on May 12 2008,02:43

Quote (Nerull @ May 11 2008,22:41)
We've grown habaneros quite successfully here in southern Indiana. Each plant will produce massive numbers of peppers, and keep doing so until it starts to get too cold. You pick them, more grow, etc, etc.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


I'm not much of a horticulturalist, but even I have managed to grow chillis (specifically habaneros and jalapenos*) in a variety of places around the UK (not the sunniest of climes). In fact the problems weren't in getting chilli plants to grow, it was in getting them to stop growing or to grow really hot peppers. The "hotness" of the peppers I grew was very variable (I have since learned that there are reasons for this). If you want to grow a cracking hot chilli it's gong to take some effort. The "Peppers by Post" people I bought the Nagas from last year have a guide if you're interested.

Louis

*Specifically to make chipotles, which I found tricky because I didn't a) have the kit or b) the experience to do this very well at the time.
Posted by: Lou FCD on May 12 2008,17:31

By my wife's request, I'm doing my version of Chicken Cacciatore tonight.

I do a sautée thing with the chicken, in butter and the table wine (a nice but cheap sauvingnon blanc), basil, oregano, garlic pepper, rosemary, and thyme.

I usually do my own sauce from scratch, but realized at the last minute I didn't have all the stuff, so I'm jazzing up a jar of "acceptable".

All over angel hair.
Posted by: C.J.O'Brien on May 12 2008,18:07

Pulled off an Eggs Benedict for the missus on Mother's Day. It's not so much difficult as it is a freaking juggling act, trying to get everything ready at the same time. We do love us some Hollandaise. Not a low-fat meal, by any stretch.

Weekend before we had some friends over and I pan-seared some shrimp. Got the recipe from Cook's Illustrated. It's a great way to cook 'em --sear in that flavor without overcooking. Over-cooked shrimp are not good. Had some jasmine rice and a little veggie stir-fry to go with it (bok choy, snow peas, broccoli). 'Twas teh excellent.

I figure the two balance in the cholesterol book.
Posted by: Lou FCD on May 12 2008,21:13

Quote (C.J.O'Brien @ May 12 2008,19:07)
Pulled off an Eggs Benedict for the missus on Mother's Day. It's not so much difficult as it is a freaking juggling act, trying to get everything ready at the same time. We do love us some Hollandaise. Not a low-fat meal, by any stretch.

Weekend before we had some friends over and I pan-seared some shrimp. Got the recipe from Cook's Illustrated. It's a great way to cook 'em --sear in that flavor without overcooking. Over-cooked shrimp are not good. Had some jasmine rice and a little veggie stir-fry to go with it (bok choy, snow peas, broccoli). 'Twas teh excellent.

I figure the two balance in the cholesterol book.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Eggs Benedict is one of those things that if it's perfect, it's divine.  If it's even a little off, it's pig slop.

I've never managed the divine.

Edited cuz I forgetted a word.


Posted by: stevestory on May 19 2008,00:05

My friend Kris was back in town and so it's been a rough weekend. Nevermind what happened last night and the necessary hair of the dog this morning. The hair of the dog became the rest of the dog, became some other dogs, became the pound, became stray dogs which wandered by...then we started off at Four Corners watching the Celtics game. I'm a long-time Boston fan but they're all from Ohio and it was Boston vs Cleveland so I was odd man out. Then we went to Goodfellas, but it was closed, so I took us to Hell, but it was 8 pm and weirdly closed for a while, so off to Bub O'Malley's upstairs, then Hell after it opened at 9 or 10.

The only libations and comestibles I remember are 4 yuenglings, a Red Headed Slut, some Bass, some more Yuengling, some shots from the well, some budweiser, some more shots, a
< buttery nipple >, some bacardi...

I need a weekend to recover from the weekend.
Posted by: stevestory on May 19 2008,00:23

Best moment of the weekend:

Steve to Kris and Suze: What day is this? Saturday? or Sunday?
Kris: What's the bad one?
Steve: Sunday?
Kris: Bingo.
Posted by: Louis on May 19 2008,03:58

Steve,

Your AtBC friends and I are getting very concerned about your drinking. Thus, we have decided to stage an Intervention.

It will be at O'Malley's Bar and Grill by the junction of 5th and Cirrhosis at 8pm on Saturday and afterwards at The Happy House of Harlots next at the corner of East 81st and Syphillis.

See you there!

Louis
Posted by: J-Dog on May 19 2008,08:01

Quote (Louis @ May 19 2008,03:58)
Steve,

Your AtBC friends and I are getting very concerned about your drinking. Thus, we have decided to stage an Intervention.

It will be at O'Malley's Bar and Grill by the junction of 5th and Cirrhosis at 8pm on Saturday and afterwards at The Happy House of Harlots next at the corner of East 81st and Syphillis.

See you there!

Louis
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Hey!  I was there about 20 years ago.  Of course I don't remember the details all that well, but I'm sure I had a hell of a time!
Posted by: Arden Chatfield on May 19 2008,09:34

Quote (Louis @ May 19 2008,01:58)
Steve,

Your AtBC friends and I are getting very concerned about your drinking. Thus, we have decided to stage an Intervention.

It will be at O'Malley's Bar and Grill by the junction of 5th and Cirrhosis at 8pm on Saturday and afterwards at The Happy House of Harlots next at the corner of East 81st and Syphillis.

See you there!

Louis
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Isn't there some kind of law against Englishmen organizing interventions? Or anyone from the British Isles, for that matter?
Posted by: Louis on May 19 2008,09:36

Quote (Arden Chatfield @ May 19 2008,15:34)
Quote (Louis @ May 19 2008,01:58)
Steve,

Your AtBC friends and I are getting very concerned about your drinking. Thus, we have decided to stage an Intervention.

It will be at O'Malley's Bar and Grill by the junction of 5th and Cirrhosis at 8pm on Saturday and afterwards at The Happy House of Harlots next at the corner of East 81st and Syphillis.

See you there!

Louis
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Isn't there some kind of law against Englishmen organizing interventions? Or anyone from the British Isles, for that matter?
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Not as far as I'm aware, at least none that I would respect anyway, why do you ask?

Louis
Posted by: Arden Chatfield on May 19 2008,21:36

Quote (Louis @ May 19 2008,07:36)
Quote (Arden Chatfield @ May 19 2008,15:34)
Quote (Louis @ May 19 2008,01:58)
Steve,

Your AtBC friends and I are getting very concerned about your drinking. Thus, we have decided to stage an Intervention.

It will be at O'Malley's Bar and Grill by the junction of 5th and Cirrhosis at 8pm on Saturday and afterwards at The Happy House of Harlots next at the corner of East 81st and Syphillis.

See you there!

Louis
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Isn't there some kind of law against Englishmen organizing interventions? Or anyone from the British Isles, for that matter?
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Not as far as I'm aware, at least none that I would respect anyway, why do you ask?

Louis
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Oh. No reason.
Posted by: Arden Chatfield on May 19 2008,22:01

Well, I thawed a bunch o' hamburger and the girls are sick of burgers so my daughter had the brilliant suggestion that I should make chili instead.

So..... one of my usual ad hoc low-attention-span chilis:

1 can white hominy
1 can pinto beans
1 can red beans
2 cans white beans
1 can black beans
1 big can of these weird Turkish* red beans that my corner market inexplicably stocks
about 1¼ lbs of hamburger

Spices:

a big spoonful of crushed garlic
4 fat whole garlic cloves
big heaping tablespoon of Grandma's™ chili powder (mild, but nice flavor)
big spoonful of coriander
big spoonful of cumin
smallish spoonful of cayenne pepper
smallish spoonful of hot paprika
big spoonful of Indian red chili sauce, normally used for homemade curries

no tomatoes since I don't like the flavor and no onions because I'm too lazy to chop one up.

slop the hominy & beans together with a little water and all the spices, brown the hamburger, stir all together, crush garlic gloves half an hour later when they're soft. Then cook another 30-45 minutes after that.

I may make cornbread on the side.

Should last the 3 of us sth. like 2½ days.


*just to piss off Louis.
Posted by: stevestory on May 19 2008,23:33

Quote (Louis @ May 19 2008,04:58)
Steve,

Your AtBC friends and I are getting very concerned about your drinking. Thus, we have decided to stage an Intervention.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Not necessary. I seldom have more than 10 drinks a day now. This weekend was an aberration. You have to know the people.
Posted by: Louis on May 20 2008,02:16

Quote (Arden Chatfield @ May 20 2008,04:01)
[SNIP]

...Turkish* ...
[SNIP]

*just to piss off Louis.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


But I LOVE the turks. Great bunch of blokes. I'm simply not that Greek.

Frankly, even though I am more than aware of the history, I don't see why there has to be any fuss at all. Turks and Greeks lived so closely together in Cyprus one could barely tell the difference (still bloody can't) prior to the occupation (and even now in some villages). It's just yet another excuse for we humans to have a right good scrap about something.

Now if you talk to some of my relatives it's a different story. Mind you considering my ancestral village is right on the edge of the border with the occupied area of Cyprus, I can kinda see where they are coming from. But whiter than white they ain't, no matter how persecuted they like to present themselves.

Anyway, Turkish beans are inferior, everyone knows that. And don't get me started on their horrible olive oil and terrible hummus. ;-)

Louis

ETA P.S. You eat white hominy? Fucking cannibal!
Posted by: Louis on May 20 2008,02:18

Quote (stevestory @ May 20 2008,05:33)
Quote (Louis @ May 19 2008,04:58)
Steve,

Your AtBC friends and I are getting very concerned about your drinking. Thus, we have decided to stage an Intervention.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Not necessary. I seldom have more than 10 drinks a day now. This weekend was an aberration. You have to know the people.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Steve,

You need to read that post again and note the location for the intervention. It perhaps isn't the sort of intervention you might have thought it is. It's an intervention with strippers and beer. You know, the GOOD kind.

Louis

ETA P.S. I have often wondered if there should be, planned well in advance, an AtBC International Meet Up at some suitable location. I think it would be a riot. Mind you, I also think it would involve Richard Hughes doing body shots off of FTK's tits, and no one wants to see that.
Posted by: stevestory on May 20 2008,03:02

Occasionally we meet up when we're around. Didn't those guys meet up in Seattle last year or something? Wesley's in town right now and we might have a beer tomorrow. It's a good idea to have a group gathering. Though it might run into the same problems as Mensa meetings--the least useful and socially capable members are the most likely to show up.
Posted by: stevestory on May 20 2008,03:04

Anybody who hangs out at PT/AtBC and is near the Chapel Hill / Carrboro area is welcome to stop by my place. I live < here >. PM for more specific location.
Posted by: stevestory on May 20 2008,03:07

I think I'll start a thread for this kind of thing.
Posted by: Louis on May 20 2008,04:54

Quote (stevestory @ May 20 2008,09:02)
Occasionally we meet up when we're around. Didn't those guys meet up in Seattle last year or something? Wesley's in town right now and we might have a beer tomorrow. It's a good idea to have a group gathering. Though it might run into the same problems as Mensa meetings--the least useful and socially capable members are the most likely to show up.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


LOL I'm not sure whether or not I should take that as a "compliment" since I suggested the meeting and therefore would be at least relatively likely to turn up!

Define "socially capable".

If you mean talkative, friendly, keen to participate in discussions and general chat (be it high fallutin' interlekchul or the latest sporting results/standard male minor league sexism in the face of beautiful women as befits the "New Lad" or whatever we're being called now, probably "metrosexual"), always gets his round in, and with a disturbing tendancy towards drunkenness, gentle mockery, banter and moderate to mildly illegal/unsafe capers*, then I'm your man.

If you mean silent, sitting in a corner, squeaking with fear when girls walk past, taking umbrage at irrelevancies, discussing the latest move in my D+D by post/programming course/obsession with PeeWee Herman/ST:TNG/DS9/V/whatever and generally being about as much fun as a wet weekend in Wolverhampton, then sorry, you'll have to call Chatfield.

;-)

Louis

* Caper: UK criminal slang for an enterprise or "blag" of some description. Softened in recent years to mean some kind of (probably inadvisable) escapade that may or may not involve one or more of the following: roller skates/shopping trolleys/beer/traffic cones/the sea/policeman's helmets/vomit/universities/myriad objects of a dubious nature/beer/more beer/drugs/beer/Amsterdam/etc.

More than one of my long term friends has remarked that my (our) youth (up to the age of about 26) was basically a very long episode of Jackass without the budget. Typified by the oft yelled motto "Let's give it some bollocks!".

Incidentally I can do civilised too. Very civilised. I'm just not good at the stuff in the middle. Uncouth riotous drunkeness: Check. Civilised, even cultured and erudite: Check. Small talk and (what I consider to be) abject dullness: Check please! I haven't been arrested in years.

And I can even be nice to Colonials. Now if that ain't tolerance I don't know what is.
Posted by: Zachriel on May 20 2008,12:13

Quote (stevestory @ June 07 2007,18:04)
Might as well have an explicit post about booze.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Mostly fermented nectar or ambrosia with a spritz of fresh dew drops collected by fæiries.
Posted by: Dr.GH on May 20 2008,23:10

I needed a very easy chili con carne to feed lots of people from mostly canned food.  I came up with;

Canned pinto beans (about 1.5 cups per person)
Drain 50% of the canning liquid and replace with chicken stock

1/8 large yellow onion per person (small diced)

1/4 cup corn kernels per person (drained if canned)

1/4 Lb ground meat (I pre-cooked for field work 4 days in advance, and I froze bags of cooked turkey meatballs good for 1 week in the field site coolers)

a lot of bottled salsa (green for ground turkey (our favorite) or red for beef, or pork)

ground cumin, granulated garlic, salt and black pepper

Serve with fresh chopped onion, tomato, cilantro, garlic and a bottle of pepper sauce (Tapa Tio is our current favorite).

If calories are not an issue, eat with corn bread and beer (add a bottle of beer to the chilli too).
Posted by: stevestory on May 20 2008,23:49

Quote (Dr.GH @ May 21 2008,00:10)
a lot of bottled salsa (green for ground turkey (our favorite)
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


I've got a weirdo roommate who does that but adds Pluto's Caribbean seasoning. It seems to work....
Posted by: stevestory on May 24 2008,18:33

Well, the training has gotten more serious and I have to switch to a no booze during the week phase. Tonight is the last drink for the next six days, so it's time to get serious.



mixed into a 2-liter of diet mountain dew.
Posted by: stevestory on May 24 2008,18:35

No, don't call the hospital. I won't be drinking the entire fifth. Maybe about a pint.
Posted by: Arden Chatfield on May 24 2008,20:33

Quote (stevestory @ May 24 2008,16:33)
Well, the training has gotten more serious and I have to switch to a no booze during the week phase. Tonight is the last drink for the next six days, so it's time to get serious.



mixed into a 2-liter of diet mountain dew.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


So, Steve, are you still alive?
Posted by: stevestory on May 25 2008,12:30

Oh, yeah. I don't even have a hangover. I didn't drink all that much of it. About a pint. Next time I have a drink, on Friday, my tolerance is going to be much lower, though, so I'll have to be careful. I don't really want to go down to zero alcohol on weekdays but the next triathlon in the area is July 13 and I'm still carrying about 15 extra lbs.
Posted by: stevestory on May 29 2008,20:34

Long sober week of eating right and training. Lots of veggies. Homemade fajitas and fresh spinach and romaine salad with caesar dressing and two anchovies. But tomorrow is drinkytime! woohoo!

I'm thinking Highland Gaelic ale, some Guiness, and about a gallon of Cuba Libres.
Posted by: deejay on May 29 2008,21:54

It looks like this thread is becoming a virtual chili cook-off, so here’s my chili con carne recipe, FWIW.  It’s gotten us through lots of football Sundays :  

Ingredients:

2 lb ground sirloin or ground bison
~3/4 lb sliced bacon
16 oz canned stewed tomatoes
~30 oz canned tomato sauce
16 oz canned kidney beans
16 oz canned chili beans
2 small or one medium onion
4 cloves garlic
1 red and 1 green bell pepper
2 or 3 raw jalapenos
3 tsp chili powder, or more to taste
2 tsp cumin, or more to taste
Black pepper
Tabasco sauce
Sesame oil
Cheddar cheese
Saltines

Dump tomatoes, tomato sauce, chili and kidney  beans into large stock pot and let simmer over low heat.  Finely dice raw jalapenos and add to pot.  If your stewed tomatoes are whole, break up with a wooden spoon.

Slice bacon into one-inch pieces and cook in frying pan over medium heat.  Cook, but do not brown.  Add all but a few pieces to stock pot.

Dice red and green bell peppers into half inch squares, and cook in frying pan, using the remaining pieces of bacon and as much of the bacon grease as your conscience will allow.  Cook over medium heat until tender, and add to pot.

Dice onion and garlic and cook in frying pan over medium heat with sesame oil, leaving aside some chopped onion as an optional garnish.  Cook for ~2-3 minutes, and add beef (or bison).  Cook until done, seasoning with black pepper and Tabasco to taste.   Drain excess grease, add to pot.

Season with cumin, chili powder, pepper and Tabasco to taste.  Longer simmer times help blend and thicken things, but eat it when you’re ready. Tomato paste is an optional thickening agent. Serve in bowls, topped with ground cheddar and raw diced onion, with saltines on the side if, like me, you’re too lazy to make corn bread.
Posted by: stevestory on May 31 2008,20:24

My girlfriend's back in town from Italy but busy. And there's kind of a boycott on < Hell > due to some strife there. So I'm hanging out here for a while. Smoking some Partagases



and drinking strawberry Burnett's. Is SNL live this week? I'm bored.


Posted by: stevestory on May 31 2008,21:29

I was in Tarheel Tobacco earlier and I bought a case of small Partaguses. Nice tasty dark leaf. Maybe it'll keep me from the American Spirits.
Posted by: carlsonjok on June 01 2008,16:19

We had friends over for dinner last night.

Appetizers:  Blue corn chips served with < Bronco Bob's Raspberry Chipotle Sauce > over cream cheese and Miner's Light beer from the Krebs Brewing Company.

Starter:  Apple-Butternut Bisque

Main Course:  Pork Filets with a Balsamic Caper Sauce, Steamed Asparagus, and 2005 Antinori Santa Christina Sangiovese.

Dessert:  Home Made Cayenne Pecan Pie and 2007 EOS Tears of Dew Late Harvest Moscato
Posted by: J-Dog on June 02 2008,10:15

Quote (carlsonjok @ June 01 2008,16:19)
We had friends over for dinner last night.

Appetizers:  Blue corn chips served with < Bronco Bob's Raspberry Chipotle Sauce > over cream cheese and Miner's Light beer from the Krebs Brewing Company.

Starter:  Apple-Butternut Bisque

Main Course:  Pork Filets with a Balsamic Caper Sauce, Steamed Asparagus, and 2005 Antinori Santa Christina Sangiovese.

Dessert:  Home Made Cayenne Pecan Pie and 2007 EOS Tears of Dew Late Harvest Moscato
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


So, when is the Big Bar B Q for all of the rest of us?
Posted by: EyeNoU on June 02 2008,11:29

He doesn't want you to interrupt his Krebs cycle.......
Posted by: stevestory on June 10 2008,23:53

Lately I've been making a lot of homemade pizzas. Toppings are black olive, pepperoni, red onion, bell peppers, shallots, garlic, basil, roasted red pepper, bacon etc.

F&$%ing Bowman Gray pool has been down for a few days with stupid heat issues. It's surprisingly hard to swim a mile in 92º water.

In the meantime, has anyone smoked < this Salvia stuff >? They're thinking about making it illegal, so I should try it soon.
Posted by: Arden Chatfield on June 13 2008,12:37

Trader's Joe's frozen latkes:



Fry them in olive oil for 5 minutes on one side then 5 minutes on the other. Man-oh-man they are friggin delicious. And for $1.99 for a box of eight, what's not to like?
Posted by: stevestory on June 13 2008,18:50

just made a smoothie:

1 cup seedless grapes
1 cup dannon blackberry yogurt
1 cup milk
1/2 banana

blended up. Yummy.
Posted by: Louis on June 13 2008,18:50

Quote (stevestory @ June 11 2008,05:53)
Lately I've been making a lot of homemade pizzas. Toppings are black olive, pepperoni, red onion, bell peppers, shallots, garlic, basil, roasted red pepper, bacon etc.

F&$%ing Bowman Gray pool has been down for a few days with stupid heat issues. It's surprisingly hard to swim a mile in 92º water.

In the meantime, has anyone smoked < this Salvia stuff >? They're thinking about making it illegal, so I should try it soon.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Salvia divinorum? A {ahem} friend tried it once in a bong. You have to take on a simply HUGE amount of smoke to get a very brief, very powerful hallucination. Not the best, needs work (the psychoactive ingredient has been synthesised IIRC).

Personally I think you'll be disappointed.

Louis
Posted by: khan on June 13 2008,19:21

I've recently gotten into serious salad making: some proteins and starches and lots of greens and other veggies.

A new one yesterday was mustard greens  (from local farmers) with several other vegetables and steak (also local) and walnut oil and red wine vinegar and a bit of mustard.
Posted by: stevestory on June 13 2008,20:22

I think I'll get a plant for the backyard garden, and when the time comes probably shred it and use it the same way you'd use snuff.
Posted by: stevestory on June 13 2008,22:06

Quote (Louis @ June 13 2008,19:50)
Salvia divinorum? A {ahem} friend tried it once in a bong. You have to take on a simply HUGE amount of smoke to get a very brief, very powerful hallucination.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Um...a friend...used to do a substance which resulted in 10 hour hallucinations, and honestly, they lasted kind of frustratingly, annoyingly long. So this friend of mine might think brief hallucinations are just what the doctor ordered. So Silvia sounds kinda like DMT. To my friend.
Posted by: Arden Chatfield on June 13 2008,22:14

Quote (stevestory @ June 13 2008,20:06)
 
Quote (Louis @ June 13 2008,19:50)
Salvia divinorum? A {ahem} friend tried it once in a bong. You have to take on a simply HUGE amount of smoke to get a very brief, very powerful hallucination.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Um...a friend...used to do a substance which resulted in 10 hour hallucinations, and honestly, they lasted kind of frustratingly, annoyingly long. So this friend of mine might think brief hallucinations are just what the doctor ordered. So Silvia sounds kinda like DMT. To my friend.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


So, say hi to this, uh, friend for us, Steve.

You know, next time you see this friend.

PS: Tell this friend that it might be risky to post here while hallucinating. You know, if he/she actually posts here.

*cough*
Posted by: stevestory on June 13 2008,22:28

Quote (Arden Chatfield @ June 13 2008,23:14)
So, say hi to this, uh, friend for us, Steve.

You know, next time you see this friend.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Will do. I think my friend is busy with the weekend. Couple of airplane bottles of Everclear, a pint of Burnett's vodka, and watching

< Tori Amos - Caught a light Sneeze >
< Regina Spektor - Fidelity >
< Bjork - Earth Intruders >

So he's having a good friday. Me, I'm just waiting til Bowman Gray pool opens at UNC tomorrow so I can do the requisite 30 laps. I have a much more boring life than he does.
Posted by: Reciprocating Bill on June 13 2008,22:29

Quote (stevestory @ June 13 2008,23:06)
Um...a friend...used to do a substance which resulted in 10 hour hallucinations, and honestly, they lasted kind of frustratingly, annoyingly long.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Artist's rendition of that annoyingly persistent hallucination:


Posted by: stevestory on June 13 2008,22:36

The typical traithlon swim is 750m, which is only 15 laps, so I've sunk into a pretty stable routine of 1 freestyle lap, 2 sidestroke laps, 1 freestyle lap, 2 sidestroke laps, etc. After the freestyle lap the heartrate is around 160, but after the sidestroke laps it falls to 120 or so, then back to 160, and so on. It's all about pacing yourself.
Posted by: stevestory on June 13 2008,22:36

Quote (Reciprocating Bill @ June 13 2008,23:29)
Quote (stevestory @ June 13 2008,23:06)
Um...a friend...used to do a substance which resulted in 10 hour hallucinations, and honestly, they lasted kind of frustratingly, annoyingly long.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Artist's rendition of that annoyingly persistent hallucination:


---------------------QUOTE-------------------


NOOOOOOOOOOOOO!
Posted by: stevestory on June 13 2008,23:01

Quote (Reciprocating Bill @ June 13 2008,23:29)
Artist's rendition of that annoyingly persistent hallucination:


---------------------QUOTE-------------------


The best rendition I've seen of...my friend's hallucinations...is the scene in Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas when the floor pattern starts spreading.
Posted by: Arden Chatfield on June 13 2008,23:06

Quote (stevestory @ June 13 2008,20:36)
The typical traithlon swim is 750m, which is only 15 laps, so I've sunk into a pretty stable routine of 1 freestyle lap, 2 sidestroke laps, 1 freestyle lap, 2 sidestroke laps, etc. After the freestyle lap the heartrate is around 160, but after the sidestroke laps it falls to 120 or so, then back to 160, and so on. It's all about pacing yourself.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Now is this you or your 'friend' we're talking about now?

 

---------------------QUOTE-------------------
The best rendition I've seen of...my friend's hallucinations...is the scene in Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas when the floor pattern starts spreading.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------



The only analogy to that I've experienced is the repeated organ/feedback noise in Sally Go Round the Roses by the Great Society that sounds *exactly* like a really unpleasant noise I used to get in my head back when I used to take mushrooms back in the early '80s. Probably deliberate on their part.
Posted by: stevestory on June 13 2008,23:44

Quote (Arden Chatfield @ June 14 2008,00:06)
Now is this you or your 'friend' we're talking about now?
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


What an indelicate question. Let's just say the guys who know me at the < Carrboro ABC store > occasionally see a guy walk in with numbers magic-markered to his limbs.
Posted by: Dr.GH on June 14 2008,01:55

So I am fairly plastered drinking my birthday bottle of Macallan. Not the bottle of "The Macallan Elelgancia" my dear wife brought me last year from London, but a bottle that was "The Macallan 12 Year Single Malt Scotch Whisky." I even have some left to prove it.

I was watching a neighbor work with his boxing coach- while having a bite of The Macallan. I was reminded of an odd experience: I had an unarmed-killing teacher who brought to class a boxer. Teacher told us to try and hurt him (the visitor). He easily blocked the standard kicks, and punched our lights out up close.

This began a 6 week instruction in boxing.

Well I might as well add that the first written rule in Greco-roman fighting was "No pocking out of eyes."

This was the occasion of the first (nonleathal) retirement from greco-roman fighting.

Pussies

Oh, This is really about The Macallan, not about killing people.

Really.

In fact, I am celebrating surviving for 57 years. I have the all time male record for my lineage. I have survived more years than my father, and my grandfathers, and my great-grandfathers. Beyond them is speculation.

As a philosophical and Quaker pacifist who finds himself in occasional deadly confrontations, I welcome the chance to live a bit further. (And have a bit of Whisky).


Posted by: Dr.GH on June 14 2008,02:47

I was not a very good Quaker- not the booze- when the elders more or less gave me the boot it was three issues; tobacco, swearing, and (their totally mistaken notion that) I took drugs. I do take beer, wine and whisky today, but at 18 I had never indulged in even those.

No, in the late 1960s we had tired of life under the threat of instant death. It has not changed much yet. This feeds the "Armageddon" fantasy. Larrdy lardy I had it (but recovered).
Posted by: Lou FCD on June 14 2008,05:59

Happy Birthday, Dr. GH.  May you survive another 57.

Further, it's good to see < Stones and Bones > more active.
Posted by: stevestory on June 14 2008,15:31

Man, I'm having the worst luck with that damn pool. If it's not overheating, I'm forgetting the schedule. Got kicked out at 4 o'clock with only 21 laps done. Now I guess I'll have to go running tonight. Before running to the liquor store, of course, it being a weekend cheat day.
Posted by: Lou FCD on June 14 2008,20:59

WANT:  Seven Deadly Glasses

< http://tinyurl.com/6x28tn >
Posted by: RupertG on June 15 2008,13:34

Oooh, Salvia Divinorum. This is what my friend had to say about _that_...

"Got some 10x concentrated leaf. Not sure what they do to it, but having failed to get anywhere with the raw stuff I thought it time to up the ante.

Recommended process: fill a small bowl. Light. inhale. Hold for as long as possible. Exhale. Repeat. Any question of a third go was moot.

Effect: Very fast onset. Bit like a blowtorch blasting away inside my head. Reality blew away, and not in a good way. No question of being able to talk or act. Was lying down already: this was a good thing. Eventually the room came back, every line in the visual field pressing like a razor blade into flesh just before the point it breaks the skin. Effects slunk off; no idea of time away, but it proved to be around two minutes. Most abiding memory: that blowtorch being used to melt away my face, stripping away everything to the roots of my teeth (which I could feel penetrating my jaw. The eye teeth were the most notable in this respect).

Conclusion: Remarkably unpleasant. Really. I've been on some stonkers in my time in the Psychonaut Cadet Corp, including one epic miscalculation that took a few day to properly sort itself out (if it did...), but nothing that ever said to me "you really don't want to do that again" with quite so much conviction."

My friend remains keen on All That Sort Of Thing, so it didn't do him lasting harm, but I've seen the look in his eye when he recounts his time on the salvia.
You'll have to be at least a sergeant in the PCC to want to give it a go.

Incidentally, what _is_ this Everclear? Is it really sold for drinking purposes? There's nothing like it in the UK.

R
Posted by: stevestory on June 15 2008,13:55

Quote (RupertG @ June 15 2008,14:34)
Incidentally, what _is_ this Everclear? Is it really sold for drinking purposes? There's nothing like it in the UK.

R
---------------------QUOTE-------------------




Everclear is 95% ethanol. So couple of 50 ml 'airplane bottle's of it gets you where you want to go very quickly. It's not legal in all states, but it is legal in North Carolina, where I live. You have to mix it with something or it'll wreck your throat and stomach. I thought about getting a pint of it yesterday, but I wound up getting a fifth of Burnett's for about $8.
Posted by: stevestory on June 15 2008,13:59

Incidentally, I saw a friend in the liquor store yesterday. A guy I know who has that court-prescribed dealy where every so often he has to blow into it as he's driving down the road, and it assays his breath for alcohol. He was buying about a gallon of booze. "Damn, buddy," I said, "I'm just getting a fifth of Burnett's." "Yeah," he said, "Burnett's is great. Run it through a Brita filter a few times and you can't tell the difference between it and Grey Goose." "Yeah, I guess," I said. "Or you could just drink three shots. Can't tell the difference then either."
Posted by: Dr.GH on June 15 2008,15:38

Quote (Lou FCD @ June 14 2008,03:59)
Further, it's good to see < Stones and Bones > more active.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Howdy Lou,

I have been writing all sorts of Evo/creato mainly directed to newspaper story comment boards, letters to editor pages, etc.

I am trying to not just write posts to BBs. I have not been copying these to my blog, but I thought I might as well.
Posted by: RupertG on June 15 2008,18:30

That's some powerful likker, all right. Worst I've tried neat was some 75% absinthe - just a taster, out of that darn curiosity. I only quite liked it - and the rest I disposed  of like a responsible absinthe drinker.

Incidentally, those still darn curious about salvia divinorum can < see the effects > for thesselves courtesy of the reliably entertaining b3ta.com and Yootoob. Worth it for the final few seconds alone...

R
Posted by: Arden Chatfield on June 16 2008,01:24

Quote (stevestory @ June 15 2008,11:55)
Everclear is 95% ethanol. So couple of 50 ml 'airplane bottle's of it gets you where you want to go very quickly. It's not legal in all states, but it is legal in North Carolina, where I live.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Yeah, it's legal in places like North Carolina and Nevada, where life is cheap.  :p
Posted by: stevestory on June 16 2008,02:26

Quote (Arden Chatfield @ June 16 2008,02:24)
Quote (stevestory @ June 15 2008,11:55)
Everclear is 95% ethanol. So couple of 50 ml 'airplane bottle's of it gets you where you want to go very quickly. It's not legal in all states, but it is legal in North Carolina, where I live.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Yeah, it's legal in places like North Carolina and Nevada, where life is cheap.  :p
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


I drank waaaay too much of that stuff Saturday night. Have to get back to the healthy lifestyle. The < online pool schedule > says



---------------------QUOTE-------------------
Summer Pool Hours:

     M-F:  6-8a & 11:30-8p



---------------------QUOTE-------------------



But it's run by a government entitity so of course it's wrong and I think it's really 6-8a, 12-2p, and 4-7:30p. After last week I have to make sure to hit the right times. An interrupted workout is frustrating.
Posted by: Dr.GH on June 17 2008,01:57

Since you are all so much more witty than I am, I will merely enjoy a Jerez Sherry.  Maybe several. Oh My. The bottle is empty. Damn, so is my glass.

I made a very good dinner, but I will not describe it totally. It was a frittata. The secret of my brilliant light frittata I will reveal.  It begins with bringing the eggs to room temperature first. But that is not revealing anything because you all know that already.

But, did you know to use a clotted cream, or as I must in this benighted land, a chemically ‘soured’ cream, results in the most productive of mixtures?

Of course you did not. Whip this into the eggs merrily. And, rather than a traditional and tiresome grating of cheese, a sliced commercial variety does just as well under a hot fire. For the tiresome traditionalist, a grated cheese say of Jarlsberg, or Mozzarella, scattered over the top of the skillet mix just before putting it under the broiler, will be fine.
Posted by: k.e.. on June 17 2008,04:03

Quote (Dr.GH @ June 14 2008,09:55)
...I had an unarmed-killing teacher who brought to class a boxer. Teacher told us to try and hurt him (the visitor). He easily blocked the standard kicks, and punched our lights out up close.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


HAR HAR THIS IS YOU

< REX KWAN DO >


Posted by: Tony M Nyphot on June 18 2008,09:36

Honoring Poachy:


Posted by: k.e.. on June 18 2008,10:01

Also......



Drunk Horse emphasizes the interpenetration of what are usually called "mind" and "body". According to this idea, people's deeply-held thoughts make them ill or at least create the preconditions for disease and psychological problems. We work to remove deeply held resentments, to release unexpressed emotions, to assuage buried terror (all of which, in this view, are caused by deeply held thoughts), in order to build self-confidence and to plant in people a positive and hopeful view of their path through life.... more

From some website
Posted by: Erasmus, FCD on June 18 2008,10:38

Quote (k.e.. @ June 18 2008,10:01)
Also......



Drunk Horse emphasizes the interpenetration of what are usually called "mind" and "body". According to this idea, people's deeply-held thoughts make them ill or at least create the preconditions for disease and psychological problems. We work to remove deeply held resentments, to release unexpressed emotions, to assuage buried terror (all of which, in this view, are caused by deeply held thoughts), in order to build self-confidence and to plant in people a positive and hopeful view of their path through life.... more

From some website
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


god that's gay.

re salvia, a friend just gave me this account.

"Put in yer pipe and burn the whole bowl without exhaling.  Be ready to puke if you need to but don't cause it will make you feel even more fucked up.

Sit down.  Try not to pass out from the euphoric rush to becoming.  The universe is becoming more transparent, very soon it will all become clear."

Re the effects, he says "I began to see strings everywhere.  My friends were sitting in the room and thought I was being a weirdo, but I understood why they did not see what I did and the strings that were attached to their thoughts were attached to everything else like everything else, but they could only see what was in the present and the strings I was seeing were attached to both past and future.  My hands became very interesting, as they are the primary mechanical means of manipulating the external universe, they are the contact point for many of the strings that connect me to the Other.  As the euphoria intensified, I became incoherent and unable to speak, it seemed as if i were at once both falling down down down a long ways and also speeding forward, with the strings flying past me like the stars on that old crappy Apple screen saver.  Gradually this feeling receded, but very slowly and almost imperceptibly.  At some point I realized that it was mostly over, but I was unable to communicate  clearly to my friends for about 25 minutes.  One of them said "there is no way that I'm doing that shit".  The other one said he saw a guy sit in a chair and do it and dude flipped out hugging the ground screaming about falling.  My experience was not like that, I feel like it was valuable learning experience but I am unable to demonstrate what I learned or how that is even knowledge.  I would not do it again probably.  Absolutely the most intense hallucinatory experience I have ever had and i have had several flavors."

I remember when this happened and I just figured it was hippies getting high on banana peels or toothpaste smeared on a cigarette or some rednecks huffing gas.  To each their own.
Posted by: Krubozumo Nyankoye on June 19 2008,00:44

In the category, homemade libations:

Ingredients

(1)  55 gal. drum with lid.
(2)  60-80 3 ft. lengths of ripe sugar cane
(3)  ~20 gallons of reasonably pure water (rain water preferred).

Combine all ingredients in the drum, it is adviseable to wash the drum thoroughly if it has been used to transport lubricants or fuels.  Boil over an iron wood fire for ~ 3 hrs adding additional water as necessary. Add culture. Cap and seal as tightly as possible, allow to ferment for 6 to 10 days, draw off upper 1/3 of liquid. Recap. Ferment another 6 -10 days, draw off remaining liquid, discard spent cane. Distill liquid twice being careful to maintain correct boiling point to evaporate only ethanol.  Bottle (in used containers for commercial liquors with screw on caps) as soon as volume is available. Allow to age a minimum of 24 hours.  Enjoy at your personal discretion.

In various cultures this is known by different names with more or less equivalent meanings. In Brasil it is refered to as Caixaxia, in various parts of Africa, cane juice.

Falvor, better than gasoline. Mixes, overly ripe grapefruit or
pineapple juice represses the gag reflex but you still have the aftertaste for a week or two.

Comments:  Do not store in nalgene or lexan bottles, they will
retain the flavor forever. Do not smoke while drinking or drink
near open flame. Do not consume if ambient temperature is
less than 25 degrees C or 75 degrees F. In humid tropical areas allow 3-4 days for rehydration.
Posted by: k.e.. on June 19 2008,02:06

That sounds almost as foul as this stuff...



---------------------QUOTE-------------------
Ever heard of "Steam" ?
by smokerscully1 on Wed Jan 30, 2008 7:15 pm

Just saw something neat here on the boob tube --Discovery channel--
some guy is spending some time with a tribe of natives somewhere in Papua New Guinea. These people have only recently been in contact with white missionarys and are trying very hard to keep to their original subsistance lifestyle. Besides hunting for wild pigs and harvesting Sago Palm these natives show this guy how they make "steam". It showed the Natives boiling wine they made from Palm juice in an old outboard motor gas can--wood fire underneath and just a small piece of some kinda coiled pipe for a condenser. Looks like it tastes pretty bad but was prolly very strong. The commentator asks the chief how long they have been distilling "steam" like it was some kinda ancient custom or something. The chief tells the guy one of their young men showed them how to do it 2 years ago when he came home to visit after he had been away at school.


---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Posted by: stevestory on June 21 2008,22:16

Partagus Pinturas are actually not that bad.
Posted by: Arden Chatfield on June 22 2008,11:50

Don't make a curry with < this > as the predominant spice. Extremely hot and quite bitter. The stuff smells a lot better than it tastes, and I'm very tolerant of weird spices.

What can I say, I was out of my < Patak's > pastes and had to improvise.  ???
Posted by: stevestory on June 24 2008,20:58

Lots of green tea these days.
Posted by: Amadan on June 28 2008,18:09

Forget the single malt, I've found the nectar of the gods Designers!


Posted by: Albatrossity2 on June 28 2008,18:32

Right now I'd enjoying one of these while cooking up a batch of French Onion Soup (Elizabeth is under the weather, and wanted soup).



It may not be the nectar of the designers, but it'll do until the nectar gets here...
Posted by: Arden Chatfield on June 28 2008,18:50

Quote (Amadan @ June 28 2008,16:09)
Forget the single malt, I've found the nectar of the gods Designers!


---------------------QUOTE-------------------


"Otard"? Is that like a creationist from Ireland?













I'll get me coat.
Posted by: Krubozumo Nyankoye on June 29 2008,21:10

Re: K.E. up thread.

Cane juice is worse than "steam". I've had both, just the fermented palm wine and the distillate, they both have a flavor.

Someone else up thread mentioned curry - great stuff that. I
have a formula handed down to me from a venerable establishment in Earl's court called the Sri Lanka. Killer, the best I have had anywhere by far. Made from fresh ingredients and kept tightly stoppered it will keep for a year or two and still pack a real whallop. If I can find it, I will post it for posterity.

Curry is ideal for bush camps. It is guaranteed to sterilize any conceivable combination of local food stuffs and make them moderately palatable no matter how bad they taste in their native state.  Fond memories of all that.

As to the cognac, I have never seen that one, I will have to try to find some and try it. While on the subject of spirits, who among us and the lurkers has experienced Mao Tai? I only recently came across it. ERV posted about it on her old blog some time ago and I think gave it a positive review.  Strange stuff but not bad at all after the first glass....
Posted by: Crabby Appleton on July 07 2008,23:45

Hey Steve, I'll be in Fayetteville this coming weekend and I have a hankerin' for crabs at the beach, (Shut up Louis, I ain't talking 'bout your kinda crabs).

A quick search of the web shows Dirty Dicks in Kill Devil Hills and Buddy's in Wrightsville Beach.

Ever been to either establishment or have another recommendation for a crab house at the beach?

Wrightsville will be closer but I think Kill Devil Hills would be more fun for a day at the beach.

Any advice would be appreciated.

Crabby
Posted by: stevestory on July 08 2008,01:34

You know honestly I never get out to the beach here. I grew up in Florida, and at a lot of seafood there, but in the 9 years since I moved to Raleigh, then Durham, and now Chapel Hill, I think I've been near the beach once. Haven't had much seafood here aside from calamari at 35 Chinese, fried catfish and salmon croquettes I make at home, and the Lobster bisque from Harris Teeter. Somebody here probably can advise you though.

edit: that should read 'ate a lot of seafood there'


Posted by: stevestory on July 08 2008,01:37

If you get anywhere near Chapel Hill feel free to stop by for a beer or sixteen.
Posted by: stevestory on July 08 2008,01:40

MMMM....salmon croquettes. drool drool drool




Posted by: stevestory on July 08 2008,01:47

I haven't been posting to the libations and comestibles thread lately. I'm not where I want to be for the < July 13 > triathlon, so I missed that, the next one is the J.F. Hurley Formula 1 Sprint Triathlon which is a totally fucked-up 5-leg race, the Lake Norman triathlon is already closed, so basically, I'm totally pissed off and not going to get back into triathlons til September. And it's depressed my usual gluttony.
Posted by: stevestory on July 08 2008,01:51

Guy in the lane next to me today, at Bowman Gray pool, did a triathlon last week in Charleston. Apparently they have them all the time there. Good for him. I'm not driving to the worst state in the union just to do a race.  :angry:
Posted by: stevestory on July 08 2008,02:04

btw, the website for 35 Chinese:

< http://www.trianglerestaurants.com/35Chinese/index.html >
Posted by: stevestory on July 08 2008,02:08

Quote (Crabby Appleton @ July 08 2008,00:45)
Wrightsville will be closer but I think Kill Devil Hills would be more fun for a day at the beach.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


I would move to Kill Devil Hills just to say I lived in f&%*ing Kill Devil Hills, NC.
Posted by: Crabby Appleton on July 08 2008,09:08

Dirty Dick's it is. If it turns out less than stellar I'll blame it on you. I'm not gonna get that close to the coast and stop for a Chinese buffet.

I never drink less than 3 beers or more than 40.

Salmon croquettes? Blecch! My Mom used to make 'em, they always had vertebrae innem. I'd rather eat salmon raw.

I'll PM you later this week.

Crabby
Posted by: Crabby Appleton on July 12 2008,00:12

3 generations of Crabby boys ate fresh caught Carolina Largemouth Bass with boiled baby red potatoes and steamed green beans.

A few of these



washed it all down.

Crabby
Posted by: Lou FCD on July 12 2008,09:01

Celebrated with a bottle of merlot last night, and did not share.

There's some left in the bottom.

FAIL.
Posted by: Amadan on July 13 2008,19:12

Sunday. The garden breathes well-being, and all is right with the world. Time for a hymn to remind us of the important things.


Posted by: improvius on July 21 2008,19:19

If anyone is interested in sake, the wife and I are starting a dedicated sake-only forum site:

< Sake Forums >
Posted by: stevestory on July 21 2008,21:34

Should we call this the Lifestyle thread, rather than just food and drink? I don't know. But treating it as such, here goes.

I've lived in Texas, Indiana, Florida, Georgia, and now North Carolina. Nine years ago I moved, from Florida, first to Raleigh, then Durham, now Chapel hill. I just walked to the convenience store and back, at 10 pm, and my shirt is sticking to me. I hate this. I'm not doing it much longer. I'm going to base my next move on one thing. I am going to find somewhere with a medium size city, where the average temperature is somewhere around 60-70 and the annual temperature variation is one of the lowest in the country. I didn't like the heat and humidity in Florida and it's better up here but it's starting to piss me off here too. 100 degrees can kiss my ass. A lot of wind would be nice too. Based on data like this:

< http://www.ncdc.noaa.gov/oa/climate/online/ccd/meantemp.html >
< http://lwf.ncdc.noaa.gov/oa/climate/online/ccd/maxtemp.html >

it looks like I'll be moving to Oregon next. I don't care if the high in January is only 45º, because the high in August is only 79º. Here it's 85º right now at 10:15pm at night. Screw this.
Posted by: drew91 on July 22 2008,06:44

Quote (stevestory @ July 21 2008,21:34)
it looks like I'll be moving to Oregon next. I don't care if the high in January is only 45º, because the high in August is only 79º.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------



I was going to wish you luck in your journey to San Diego before you mentioned Oregon.

Maybe you're just thinking aloud, but I say go for it.  I did a post-doc at Oregon State in Corvallis and really enjoyed my time there.  They have great beer and tons of high quality outdoor activities to enjoy, and the coast is fantastic.  The wife and I enjoyed many a trip to the Rogue brewery in Newport on our way to appease her shopping habit in Lincoln City/Depoe Bay.

Eugene and Portland are also really nice.    I'd stay away from the East half of the state if you're not into wild temperature fluctuations though. :)



---------------------QUOTE-------------------
Here it's 85º right now at 10:15pm at night. Screw this.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------



Yup.  Here too.  We're having 100º day after 100º day in Austin...and my AC just stopped working (again) last night.   :angry:
Posted by: Assassinator on July 22 2008,11:15

Quote (stevestory @ July 21 2008,21:34)
Should we call this the Lifestyle thread, rather than just food and drink? I don't know. But treating it as such, here goes.

I've lived in Texas, Indiana, Florida, Georgia, and now North Carolina. Nine years ago I moved, from Florida, first to Raleigh, then Durham, now Chapel hill. I just walked to the convenience store and back, at 10 pm, and my shirt is sticking to me. I hate this. I'm not doing it much longer. I'm going to base my next move on one thing. I am going to find somewhere with a medium size city, where the average temperature is somewhere around 60-70 and the annual temperature variation is one of the lowest in the country. I didn't like the heat and humidity in Florida and it's better up here but it's starting to piss me off here too. 100 degrees can kiss my ass. A lot of wind would be nice too. Based on data like this:

< http://www.ncdc.noaa.gov/oa/climate/online/ccd/meantemp.html >
< http://lwf.ncdc.noaa.gov/oa/climate/online/ccd/maxtemp.html >

it looks like I'll be moving to Oregon next. I don't care if the high in January is only 45º, because the high in August is only 79º. Here it's 85º right now at 10:15pm at night. Screw this.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Why would you want a lot of wind? It's just annoying when you're going to cycle somewhere (something wich I wich I do a lót, ya know, Dutch ;)). A nice breeze on warm days is nice though. Agree on you about the temperatures though, those in Oregon sound perfect (although 45 in January doesn't mean snow :().
But it seems you've moved a lót, what about friends and family then? I mean, talking to them via teh intrawebz isn't everything. Can't imagine moving so easely so far away.
Posted by: stevestory on July 22 2008,11:20

Quote (drew91 @ July 22 2008,07:44)
I was going to wish you luck in your journey to San Diego before you mentioned Oregon.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


According to the data I found, San Diego and several other Californian cities have the same attributes I'm looking for as Oregon. But California's housing prices are prohibitively expensive, so I think Oregon it is.
Posted by: Arden Chatfield on July 22 2008,13:01

Quote (stevestory @ July 22 2008,09:20)
 
Quote (drew91 @ July 22 2008,07:44)
I was going to wish you luck in your journey to San Diego before you mentioned Oregon.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


According to the data I found, San Diego and several other Californian cities have the same attributes I'm looking for as Oregon. But California's housing prices are prohibitively expensive, so I think Oregon it is.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


If you're really jonesing for 250+ overcast days a year & LOTS of rain, Oregon should definitely scratch your itch. But keep in mind, Oregon is cheap for a reason: it's got one of the highest unemployment rates in the country. There's Portland (a great city), + a few pockets like Eugene & Corvallis, but aside from that, it's very poor. The basic demographic of rural/small town Oregon is unemployed alcoholic loggers, hippie expats from California, and pot growers. (These categories overlap. In some places you can add poverty-stricken, pissed off Indians.) Also, most of the state is very Red, except for Portland and Eugene, which are very Blue.

Also, the state has been filling up with old people from California for some time now. Again, beautiful scenery + no jobs = cheap land for wealthy retirees.
Posted by: stevestory on July 22 2008,13:04

How's the employment in Portland, I wonder? That's probably where I'd move.
Posted by: Arden Chatfield on July 22 2008,13:08

Quote (stevestory @ July 22 2008,11:04)
How's the employment in Portland, I wonder? That's probably where I'd move.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Not sure, but probably not bad. If you're seriously considering it, go visit the place to see how you like it. I'd recommend a mid-winter visit, so you're clear on what you're getting into.

While you're there, visit < Powell's Books >, the best bookstore I've ever been in.
Posted by: Erasmus, FCD on July 22 2008,13:18

hey sternburglar, ashevegas ain't too bad.  ifn' you can afford it.
Posted by: Arden Chatfield on July 22 2008,13:26

Quote (Erasmus, FCD @ July 22 2008,11:18)
hey sternburglar, ashevegas ain't too bad.  ifn' you can afford it.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


And you'll be neighbors with Joy!
Posted by: carlsonjok on July 22 2008,13:39

Quote (stevestory @ July 22 2008,13:04)
How's the employment in Portland, I wonder? That's probably where I'd move.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


I would note that, in the current Money magazine, < Chapel Hill > comes in at No. 65 on the list of Top 100 small cities to live in.  By contrast, Oregon has no entries on the list.

HA HA.  I live in < No. 6 >!!! Of course, it is hotter than blazes here, too. So, maybe you shouldn't bring your sweaty stuff here.  More beer for me that way.

EDIT:Unverbed an adjective.
Posted by: Arden Chatfield on July 22 2008,13:52

Quote (carlsonjok @ July 22 2008,11:39)
Quote (stevestory @ July 22 2008,13:04)
How's the employment in Portland, I wonder? That's probably where I'd move.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


I would note that, in the current Money magazine, < Chapel Hill > comes in at No. 65 on the list of Top 100 small cities to live in.  By contrast, Oregon has no entries on the list.

HA HA.  I live in < No. 6 >!!! Of course, it is hotter than blazes here, too. So, maybe you shouldn't bring your sweating stuff here.  More beer for me that way.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Jumping Jeezus on a pogo stick, only 4 cities in California, and they're frigging Irvine, Roseville, Fountain Valley, and Sunnyvale?

Roseville is uncontrolled surburban sprawl minimall hell, and Sunnyvale is the same thing, except for people with 7-figure salaries.

Yeesh, why don't they just put Colorado Springs as number one?
Posted by: carlsonjok on July 22 2008,13:57

Quote (Arden Chatfield @ July 22 2008,13:52)
Yeesh, why don't they just put Colorado Springs as number one?
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


My understanding is that Colorado Springs has an out-of-control theft problem,




Posted by: Erasmus, FCD on July 22 2008,14:06

Quote (Arden Chatfield @ July 22 2008,13:26)
Quote (Erasmus @ FCD,July 22 2008,11:18)
hey sternburglar, ashevegas ain't too bad.  ifn' you can afford it.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


And you'll be neighbors with Joy!
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


actually, from her account, it looks like she lives closer to Old Fort or Marion.  not sure where her aura resides, perhaps on the moon or beneath a silvery waterfall in a pastoral glen.
Posted by: Arden Chatfield on July 22 2008,14:21

Quote (Erasmus @ FCD,July 22 2008,12:06)
not sure where her aura resides, perhaps on the moon or beneath a silvery waterfall in a pastoral glen.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


On a mountain. She said so.
Posted by: stevestory on July 22 2008,14:37

Quote (carlsonjok @ July 22 2008,14:39)
Quote (stevestory @ July 22 2008,13:04)
How's the employment in Portland, I wonder? That's probably where I'd move.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


I would note that, in the current Money magazine, < Chapel Hill > comes in at No. 65 on the list of Top 100 small cities to live in.  By contrast, Oregon has no entries on the list.

HA HA.  I live in < No. 6 >!!! Of course, it is hotter than blazes here, too. So, maybe you shouldn't bring your sweaty stuff here.  More beer for me that way.

EDIT:Unverbed an adjective.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Chapel Hill does have some really nice qualities. Late fall through early spring it's just fantastic. But I'm just not going to put up with 95º temps anymore.
Posted by: Arden Chatfield on July 22 2008,14:42

Quote (stevestory @ July 22 2008,12:37)
Chapel Hill does have some really nice qualities. Late fall through early spring it's just fantastic. But I'm just not going to put up with 95º temps anymore.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Well, there goes my theory that growing up in a climate like that makes one most able to tolerate it.

BTW, 71 degrees, sunny & breezy in the East Bay today.


Posted by: rhmc on July 22 2008,15:21

personally, i like hot temps, high humidity and biting flies.  :)
Posted by: Crabby Appleton on July 24 2008,02:58

Well, Crabby Jr. couldn't make a trip to the Outer Banks so Crabby Jr. Jr. and I went on a road trip to Wrightsville Beach to see if Buddies had the crabs.

No, they did not, despite what their website says! No oysters either, the bastids and parking for public access to the beach or anything else for that matter is 25 cents for 10 minutes! WTF? Who carries a couple of rolls of quarters to the beach?

So the mission was set, find some live blue crabs we could take back to Fayetteville. Failure was not an option.

We finally found 'em at a place called Mason's Marina on the Middle Sound. We bought a bushel of medium jimmys and iced 'em down for the trip back. Alarmingly (to me) they were selling sponge crabs along with sooks and jimmys. Is this legal in NC? I need to check.

Jr. Jr. slept most of the way back (2 hour trip in the Lil' Red Rocket). I prepped the spices (my own super secret MD style recipe) while the water was set to boil, then threw the first batch in to steam, extry spice of course.

Jr., Mz. Jr. and friends walk in just as they were ready, naturally.



Mz. Jr. was reluctant at first, this being her first time and all but she soon fell to with mucho gusto (you have to or starve around Crabby and his boys).

A very tasty Belizean shrimp, conch and sea trout ceviche was on the bar. Widmer Hefeweizen, Negra Modelo and more Boulevard Pale Ale were the beverages served.

Much fun was had by all.

Crabby
Posted by: Argon on July 24 2008,09:19

Quick question: How much $$ are a bushel of Blue crabs going for these days? I thought they were getting tougher to find.
Posted by: Crabby Appleton on July 25 2008,00:03

Quote (Argon @ July 24 2008,09:19)
Quick question: How much $$ are a bushel of Blue crabs going for these days? I thought they were getting tougher to find.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


I paid $72 for the bushel which was very reasonable. The woman at the dock said she had carpal tunnel syndrome so I had to tong them out of the sluice. I made sure there wasn't a whitey in the basket and they all had both claws.

I just looked around on the web and found a report that MD harvests are down 70% since 1990?!

Crabby
Posted by: stevestory on July 25 2008,01:30

Quote (Crabby Appleton @ July 25 2008,01:03)
I just looked around on the web and found a report that MD harvests are down 70% since 1990?!

Crabby
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


It's been a few years since I read Consider the Lobster, but IIRC lobsters were so plentiful 100 years ago that they were considered poor man's food, and fed to prisoners and farm animals.
Posted by: stevestory on Aug. 10 2008,01:10

on another thread Carlsonjok said:



---------------------QUOTE-------------------
You planning on spending all your time in pubs?

Oh, it's Steve. Nevermind. Asked and answered.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------



Hey dude. I've got a triathlon coming up in Sept. I gotta carbo-load.  :p
Posted by: stevestory on Aug. 26 2008,23:20

Is anything ingestible comestible? I'll leave that question for the philosophers.

the following events are all fictional depictions of a character I'll call Teve Tory, and none of the below happened in real life:



---------------------QUOTE-------------------
So today was Venture 3 into the cow fields looking for shrooms.
Another disappointment. The past two days I found only very white
mushrooms. Those are def not Psilocybe cubensis, which have a brownish
splotch on top and a purple band on the stem. Tonight I didn't find
anything matching the criteria either, though I went much further out
than before. P. cubensis is somewhat rare, it turns out. But I did
find a brownish cap mushroom with a brown/purple stem and grey gills
as opposed to pure white gills. What the hell, I thought, so I carried
it back to the casa and stuck it in a ziploc bag in the freezer after
cutting about a gram or two off and swallowing that. No need to worry
about me, I know for a fact this wasn't any kind of Amanita, which is
horribly poisonous. Amanita usually has either white or red caps, and innocent
looking but evil white gills. This isn't that. Hopefully it's some
kind of psilocybe and 30 minutes from now I'll be hallucinating, but
95% odds nothing will happen. I think I'm going to need a car to drive
around to enough fields to find some which have P. cubensis in them.

One of the great things about hallucinogens in general and mushrooms
in particular is that it's virtually impossible to overdose on them.
You'd have to eat like 40 lbs of shrooms to OD.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Posted by: stevestory on Aug. 26 2008,23:30

Quote (stevestory @ July 25 2008,02:30)
Quote (Crabby Appleton @ July 25 2008,01:03)
I just looked around on the web and found a report that MD harvests are down 70% since 1990?!

Crabby
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


It's been a few years since I read Consider the Lobster, but IIRC lobsters were so plentiful 100 years ago that they were considered poor man's food, and fed to prisoners and farm animals.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Rereading Consider the Lobster. I have mixed feelings. The first essay, about the porn industry, is amusing. The last essay, Host, is enough to permanently wreck your enjoyment of DFW's footnote-heavy style. The Dostoevsky essay inserts these cheap ethical questions willi-nilli throughout the text, in a very disruptive way. So I'm not sure I should have reread it.
Posted by: Arden Chatfield on Aug. 27 2008,10:01

Quote (stevestory @ Aug. 26 2008,21:20)
But I did find a brownish cap mushroom with a brown/purple stem and grey gills as opposed to pure white gills. What the hell, I thought, so I carried it back to the casa and stuck it in a ziploc bag in the freezer after cutting about a gram or two off and swallowing that. No need to worry about me, I know for a fact this wasn't any kind of Amanita, which is horribly poisonous. Amanita usually has either white or red caps, and innocent looking but evil white gills. This isn't that.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Well, if Steve disappears and never posts anywhere again, at least we'll know what the reason was.
Posted by: JohnW on Aug. 27 2008,11:00

Quote (Arden Chatfield @ Aug. 27 2008,08:01)
Quote (stevestory @ Aug. 26 2008,21:20)
But I did find a brownish cap mushroom with a brown/purple stem and grey gills as opposed to pure white gills. What the hell, I thought, so I carried it back to the casa and stuck it in a ziploc bag in the freezer after cutting about a gram or two off and swallowing that. No need to worry about me, I know for a fact this wasn't any kind of Amanita, which is horribly poisonous. Amanita usually has either white or red caps, and innocent looking but evil white gills. This isn't that.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Well, if Steve disappears and never posts anywhere again, at least we'll know what the reason was.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


And if his next post is


---------------------QUOTE-------------------
ABABABABABABA
1234567890-=qwertyuiopasdfghjkl;'zxcvbnm,./
weeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeee!!!!!!!
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


we'll know he found what he was looking for.
Posted by: EyeNoU on Aug. 27 2008,11:05

Quote (stevestory @ Aug. 26 2008,23:20)
Is anything ingestible comestible? I'll leave that question for the philosophers.

the following events are all fictional depictions of a character I'll call Teve Tory, and none of the below happened in real life:



---------------------QUOTE-------------------
So today was Venture 3 into the cow fields looking for shrooms.
Another disappointment. The past two days I found only very white
mushrooms. Those are def not Psilocybe cubensis, which have a brownish
splotch on top and a purple band on the stem. Tonight I didn't find
anything matching the criteria either, though I went much further out
than before. P. cubensis is somewhat rare, it turns out. But I did
find a brownish cap mushroom with a brown/purple stem and grey gills
as opposed to pure white gills. What the hell, I thought, so I carried
it back to the casa and stuck it in a ziploc bag in the freezer after
cutting about a gram or two off and swallowing that. No need to worry
about me, I know for a fact this wasn't any kind of Amanita, which is
horribly poisonous. Amanita usually has either white or red caps, and innocent
looking but evil white gills. This isn't that. Hopefully it's some
kind of psilocybe and 30 minutes from now I'll be hallucinating, but
95% odds nothing will happen. I think I'm going to need a car to drive
around to enough fields to find some which have P. cubensis in them.

One of the great things about hallucinogens in general and mushrooms
in particular is that it's virtually impossible to overdose on them.
You'd have to eat like 40 lbs of shrooms to OD.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


---------------------QUOTE-------------------


A friend that went to college in Florida told me the cattle had to have grain in their diet to produce 'shrooms. IIRC, he said the stems would turn purple when you broke them.
Posted by: Erasmus, FCD on Aug. 27 2008,11:30

steve god dammit don't fuck around with mushrooms.  get a key, get spore prints, know the morphology, don't eat shit you can't identify.  there is some bad shit out there that ain't amanita.

i recommend David Arora's "Mushrooms Demystified".

Now that the scolding is over, there are some other things you might look for.  Stropharia have hallucinogenic representatives, not that you care about that sort of thing.  Arora covers mostly western species but there is some stuff for common north american things.

ETA  P cubensis is actually rather weak, compared to some of the other species in the genus.  Don't fuck with them without using a key with spore prints and knowing the different type of gill and stem morphologies.
Posted by: stevestory on Sep. 03 2008,02:01

Quote (Erasmus, FCD @ Aug. 27 2008,12:30)
steve god dammit don't fuck around with mushrooms.  get a key, get spore prints, know the morphology, don't eat shit you can't identify.  there is some bad shit out there that ain't amanita.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


That wasn't me. That was a fictional character named Teve Tory. I would never advocate that sort of behavior. It's illegal and sets a bad example for the childrens.

All I was up to this weekend was, the missus brought some homemade Limoncello with her. It was good, and very smooth, but too sweet to drink in quantity. Sadly, I'm in training, and can't really drink anything in quantity at the moment.
Posted by: stevestory on Sep. 08 2008,21:13

I recommend < this stuff. > It's like Mountain Dew for adults.
Posted by: dheddle on Sep. 09 2008,08:51

Quote (stevestory @ Sep. 08 2008,21:13)
I recommend < this stuff. > It's like Mountain Dew for adults.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


I think I'll try that. Maybe next Sunday (like, OMG, after church of course!!) while watching NASCAR. Seems like fitting environs for "adult Mountain Dew." And all the time laughing at those F1-ers with their tiny glasses of  chablis.
Posted by: Louis on Sep. 09 2008,09:04

Quote (dheddle @ Sep. 09 2008,14:51)
Quote (stevestory @ Sep. 08 2008,21:13)
I recommend < this stuff. > It's like Mountain Dew for adults.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


I think I'll try that. Maybe next Sunday (like, OMG, after church of course!!) while watching NASCAR. Seems like fitting environs for "adult Mountain Dew." And all the time laughing at those F1-ers with their tiny glasses of  chablis.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Not that I like F1 (it's dull as old shit IMO) but it isn't "tiny glasses of chablis", it's "large, endless glasses of champagne and hordes of sexy women with all their own teeth".

You can fault the "sport" of F1 (and I do) but you can't fault the side dishes.

Anyway, it all needs more cowbell.

Louis
Posted by: carlsonjok on Sep. 09 2008,09:24

Quote (dheddle @ Sep. 09 2008,08:51)
Quote (stevestory @ Sep. 08 2008,21:13)
I recommend < this stuff. > It's like Mountain Dew for adults.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


I think I'll try that. Maybe next Sunday (like, OMG, after church of course!!) while watching NASCAR. Seems like fitting environs for "adult Mountain Dew." And all the time laughing at those F1-ers with their tiny glasses of  chablis.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Not chablis, macchiatos.

HA HA THIS IS YOU AND RTH (before he left)


Posted by: Arden Chatfield on Sep. 09 2008,10:32

Quote (stevestory @ Sep. 08 2008,19:13)
I recommend < this stuff. > It's like Mountain Dew for adults.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


I think I already made this comment here a few years ago (Carlson can track it down), but it's been said that Irish coffee is the perfect beverage since nothing else combines alcohol, caffeine, sugar, and fat.
Posted by: stevestory on Sep. 09 2008,20:37

I have to agree. That does make it nearly the perfect food. That reminds me I need to make some french-pressed French Roast. It's sort of redneck french press. I heat the water to about 210º, then spoon in the coffee grinds and stir, then after a couple minutes I strain out the grinds with the thin mesh of a splatter screen. Starbucks French Roast is the only whole-bean I could find at the local grocery store here in BFE. Would have preferred some Sumatra.
Posted by: Dr.GH on Sep. 09 2008,22:26

I make a very simple and very pleasent fish soup. I take what ever 2lbs of white meat fish I have just caught (the more species the better. Today was only Paralabrax sp.). I cut the filets into 3cm cubes, and add them to the boiling soup base and then turn off the heat. After 2 minutes, serve.

The trick is the soup base.

I use:
1 jar Newman's Own Marinara
1 8oz can of baby clams in juice
3 cloves of garlic, minced and pasted with 1/8 teaspoon of salt
1/2 red bell pepper, diced small (1/4 inch, or 6 mm max)
and ~1/2 bottle of a good red wine (drink the rest)

Some times I add a dozen shrimp, and/or 1/4 pound of mushrooms. Or all of the above.

I did all the above tonight except finish the wine- it seems a bit too much.


Posted by: Dr.GH on Sep. 09 2008,22:44

Quote (stevestory @ Sep. 09 2008,18:37)
I have to agree. That does make it nearly the perfect food. That reminds me I need to make some french-pressed French Roast. It's sort of redneck french press. I heat the water to about 210º, then spoon in the coffee grinds and stir, then after a couple minutes I strain out the grinds with the thin mesh of a splatter screen. Starbucks French Roast is the only whole-bean I could find at the local grocery store here in BFE. Would have preferred some Sumatra.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


We used to make "cowboy coffee" in the field. Boil as many cups of water as your pot "makes." (For my 12 person field crews, I used my grandmother's 100 year old 32 cup coffee pot). When the water is boiling, add 1 teaspoon of coarse ground coffee per cup of water. Remove from heat.

Drop in a few egg shells from breakfast preparation to settle the grounds.

Dang, now I am hungry...
Posted by: Arden Chatfield on Sep. 19 2008,12:43

This is wrong on so many levels I don't know where to begin:


Posted by: Louis on Sep. 19 2008,13:15

Quote (Arden Chatfield @ Sep. 19 2008,18:43)
This is wrong on so many levels I don't know where to begin:

[SNIMAGE]
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


We may disagree on many thing Arden, but on curries, you and I are in complete agreement.

Louis
Posted by: stevestory on Sep. 19 2008,13:34

Making do with what i have, i made a ginger scallion chicken dish last night, and it was pretty good, except for spiciness i used this stuff



and the heat was okay but the chili taste didn't work. I think i'm just going to get some ground cayenne pepper when i go to the sto' later.
Posted by: Arden Chatfield on Sep. 19 2008,13:37

Quote (Louis @ Sep. 19 2008,11:15)
Quote (Arden Chatfield @ Sep. 19 2008,18:43)
This is wrong on so many levels I don't know where to begin:

[SNIMAGE]
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


We may disagree on many thing Arden, but on curries, you and I are in complete agreement.

Louis
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


This is a 'Vermont curry'. I suppose we should be happy it doesn't have maple syrup in it.
Posted by: Louis on Sep. 19 2008,13:46

Quote (Arden Chatfield @ Sep. 19 2008,19:37)
Quote (Louis @ Sep. 19 2008,11:15)
Quote (Arden Chatfield @ Sep. 19 2008,18:43)
This is wrong on so many levels I don't know where to begin:

[SNIMAGE]
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


We may disagree on many thing Arden, but on curries, you and I are in complete agreement.

Louis
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


This is a 'Vermont curry'. I suppose we should be happy it doesn't have maple syrup in it.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Actually that doesn't sound bad...

....it sounds like a heresy that should punished to the most extreme level possible.

Louis
Posted by: drew91 on Sep. 19 2008,14:13

Rough week (I've got a newborn at home), so I'll be chasing a burger and fries with some of this



And thinking about some of this for dessert


Posted by: Arden Chatfield on Sep. 19 2008,14:16

Quote (stevestory @ Sep. 19 2008,11:34)
Making do with what i have, i made a ginger scallion chicken dish last night, and it was pretty good, except for spiciness i used this stuff



and the heat was okay but the chili taste didn't work. I think i'm just going to get some ground cayenne pepper when i go to the sto' later.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


That's basically just a pretty ordinary Mexican hot sauce that's for putting on chips, eggs, or soup. But I bet that's probably the best that's available in BFNW North Florida, right?
Posted by: stevestory on Sep. 19 2008,14:59

Quote (Arden Chatfield @ Sep. 19 2008,15:16)
That's basically just a pretty ordinary Mexican hot sauce that's for putting on chips, eggs, or soup. But I bet that's probably the best that's available in BFNW North Florida, right?
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


It's pretty ordinary. You can actually find lots of good stuff here, I was just making mexican last week and Valentina's is good for that. I'll get some cayenne and such today.
Posted by: stevestory on Sep. 21 2008,18:00

Are there any tater chippies better than Cape Cod?
Posted by: Crabby Appleton on Sep. 24 2008,01:10

For those who haven't heard of it, or have but haven't tried it, let me recommend the beer butt chicken.

Take your favorite brand of beer, in a can, and punch several holes in the top of the can with a church key. Pour off about half the can and stuff the can up the rear of the chicken. Use the legs to form a tripod to hold the chicken upright and place in a shallow pan. Plug the neck with whatever is handy, an onion, chunk of apple or something similar. Bake, grill or as I do, smoke the bird at º350 for an hour and a half or till the juice runs clear and prepare to enjoy the best bird you ever ate.

There are devices to hold the can upright making spills less likely, I have one that holds 2 cans/birds and 8 ears of corn for when company comes but I also have a device made by Weber that eliminates the need for a can altogether.



I use cherry wood and a dry rub for extry flavor.



Look at the juice on that cutting board.

Scrumptious!

Crabby
Posted by: Crabby Appleton on Sep. 24 2008,01:37

Another summer favorite around here is Parmesan Stuffed Peppers.

Take a block of cream cheese and let in soften at room temperature. Add grated Parmesan cheese and stir it in till the mixture is loaded with Parmesan, I do it by feel and taste.

I use Hungarian Hot Wax Peppers for stuffing but anything milder or hotter of a similar size will do. Cut the end off and make a slit down the side and remove ribs and seeds. If I'm making them for me and Missus Crabby, the ribs/seeds get chopped and mixed in to the cheese for extra flavor.

Stuff the peppers with the cheese mixture and squeeze to close.



Ready for beer batter.

The beer batter is simple, take 3/4 cup of flour, 1/4 cup of corn starch, 1 1/2 tsp of baking powder (not soda) and salt to taste, (I use a short teaspoon). Sift the ingredients into a bowl. Add a tablespoon of olive or peanut oil. Add 3/4 cup of good beer just before you are ready to start cooking and whip till it's smooth. You can add a bit of water to make it a bit thinner if you prefer.

Heat some good quality peanut oil to º375, dip the peppers in the batter and fry a few at a time till golden brown and cheese starts to come out of the peppers. Drain well and enjoy.



Crabby
Posted by: carlsonjok on Oct. 07 2008,15:44

Advice needed.

I have tried, several times now, to cook bratwurst in beer and use the reduced beer to make a gravy. I have tried this with Shiner Bock and Guiness.  In both cases, the resulting gravy has a bitter edge to it that spoils the dish.

I need suggestions for a style of beer that has alot of flavor, but doesn't have that bitter finish to it. What say you?
Posted by: C.J.O'Brien on Oct. 07 2008,16:07



---------------------QUOTE-------------------
Advice needed.

I have tried, several times now, to cook bratwurst in beer and use the reduced beer to make a gravy. I have tried this with Shiner Bock and Guiness.  In both cases, the resulting gravy has a bitter edge to it that spoils the dish.

I need suggestions for a style of beer that has alot of flavor, but doesn't have that bitter finish to it. What say you?
---------------------QUOTE-------------------



Actually, we're going to have a little Oktoberfestivities on the homestead and so I was looking around for just such a thing. I found this online. It sounded good, so I will make.

 

---------------------QUOTE-------------------
1 large jar of Sauerkraut - drained
1 large sweet onion - chopped
8 slices bacon
1/4 cup brown sugar
4 bratwursts, sliced thick
1 dark beer
Preparation:
In large skillet, cook bacon til crispy. Remove, drain, and crumble. Add chopped onion to bacon grease, and saute on low/medium heat until soft. Add drained sauerkraut. Sprinkle crumbled bacon on top, then stir in with brown sugar, and beer. Cover and simmer about 10 minutes. Add sliced sausage on top. Cover and simmer on low about 20 minutes until the brats are cooked. Serve and enjoy!
---------------------QUOTE-------------------



No linky, sorry, 'cause I didn't know I was going to be sharing. Totally forget where I found it. However, in answer to your question, carlsonjok, I think a bock beer will do well here. Sweeter than a stout, but robust of flavor.

ETA: Doh! you say you used Shiner, so maybe not, I don't know. As I recall, though, Shiner is a little more bitter than most bocks I have tried. Maybe it wants a doppelbock or just a more traditional German bock?
Posted by: JohnW on Oct. 07 2008,16:41

Quote (C.J.O'Brien @ Oct. 07 2008,14:07)


---------------------QUOTE-------------------
Advice needed.

I have tried, several times now, to cook bratwurst in beer and use the reduced beer to make a gravy. I have tried this with Shiner Bock and Guiness.  In both cases, the resulting gravy has a bitter edge to it that spoils the dish.

I need suggestions for a style of beer that has alot of flavor, but doesn't have that bitter finish to it. What say you?
---------------------QUOTE-------------------



Actually, we're going to have a little Oktoberfestivities on the homestead and so I was looking around for just such a thing. I found this online. It sounded good, so I will make.

   

---------------------QUOTE-------------------
1 large jar of Sauerkraut - drained
1 large sweet onion - chopped
8 slices bacon
1/4 cup brown sugar
4 bratwursts, sliced thick
1 dark beer
Preparation:
In large skillet, cook bacon til crispy. Remove, drain, and crumble. Add chopped onion to bacon grease, and saute on low/medium heat until soft. Add drained sauerkraut. Sprinkle crumbled bacon on top, then stir in with brown sugar, and beer. Cover and simmer about 10 minutes. Add sliced sausage on top. Cover and simmer on low about 20 minutes until the brats are cooked. Serve and enjoy!
---------------------QUOTE-------------------



No linky, sorry, 'cause I didn't know I was going to be sharing. Totally forget where I found it. However, in answer to your question, carlsonjok, I think a bock beer will do well here. Sweeter than a stout, but robust of flavor.

ETA: Doh! you say you used Shiner, so maybe not, I don't know. As I recall, though, Shiner is a little more bitter than most bocks I have tried. Maybe it wants a doppelbock or just a more traditional German bock?
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


You do need to add a bit of sugar to tame the bitterness, but I wouldn't toss in 1/4 cup all at once, unless it's sausage and sauerkraut jam you're after.  A couple of tablespoons at a time, and taste.  Keep a few bottles back for tasting also.
Posted by: Tracy P. Hamilton on Oct. 07 2008,16:42

Quote (carlsonjok @ Oct. 07 2008,15:44)
Advice needed.

I have tried, several times now, to cook bratwurst in beer and use the reduced beer to make a gravy. I have tried this with Shiner Bock and Guiness.  In both cases, the resulting gravy has a bitter edge to it that spoils the dish.

I need suggestions for a style of beer that has alot of flavor, but doesn't have that bitter finish to it. What say you?
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Bottled Guinness is definitely too hoppy (and astringent from roasted grains).  Shiner Bock surprises me, but then it is not really a bock either.  Googlage shows 13 IBU for Shiner Bock.  BJCP guidelines for dark american lager say 8-20 IBU.

You need a beer with very low hops.  Maybe a hefewiezen.  Maybe a dunkelwiezen for more flavor.  In the BJCP guidelines the range is 8-15.

Or maybe you just need more malt, try a doppelbock like Paulaner Salvator.

Lambics also don't use much hops, and frequently have fruit in them - cherry reduction from a Kriek might be good.
Posted by: C.J.O'Brien on Oct. 07 2008,16:56



---------------------QUOTE-------------------
You do need to add a bit of sugar to tame the bitterness, but I wouldn't toss in 1/4 cup all at once
---------------------QUOTE-------------------



Yeah, I thought that seemed a little heavy on the sugar. Thanks for the tip.
Posted by: carlsonjok on Oct. 07 2008,17:00

Thanks, everyone!  I have actually made a beef stew with a doppelbock (Wagner Valley Sled Dog Doppelbock, if you must know). I can't get that here, but I can get Belgian doppelbocks and trippelbocks here, so I will try one of them next time.  

I also never even thought to add some sugar to the gravy.

EDIT: I am not much of a fan of dunkelweizen as a straight drink, but it might work in a recipe.
Posted by: stevestory on Oct. 07 2008,23:16

asparagus coated in olive oil, salt, and pepper, and broiled for 2-3 mins.

nummy nummy.
Posted by: dvunkannon on Oct. 16 2008,14:06

Going to a Halloween party on Saturday night, I'm planning on making pumpkin mochi. Anyone ever make mochi before?
Posted by: C.J.O'Brien on Oct. 16 2008,14:31



---------------------QUOTE-------------------
asparagus coated in olive oil, salt, and pepper, and broiled for 2-3 mins.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------



Works well on the grill, too.
Posted by: stevestory on Oct. 21 2008,23:31

So gradually over the past year I've been doing grilled cheese experiments. the bread's pretty standard white bread. The coating on the outside has been variable (Promise, Smart Balance, olive oil, or whipped butter) and hasn't made too much diff. But the cheese...I'm now thinking the lowbrow approach might be better. So far I've used, for cheese, slices of provolone, swiss, mozarella, or muenster. And the results have all been unsatisfactory. I'm starting to think the lowbrow approach, aka those fake cheese slices like Kraft singles, which are I think mostly vegetable oil, would work better. The real cheese melts but is too stiff. The fake cheese gets gooier and I'm thinking that might actually be better.
Posted by: C.J.O'Brien on Oct. 22 2008,01:43

Oktoberfest accomplished. The beer brats were excellent. I used the Spaten Optimator doppelbock in the recipe I copied above (but with a mere heavy tablespoon of dark brown sugar, not the 1/4 cup called for [as John sagely counseled]. A less malty and sweet beer might call for somewhat more sugar.)

Also grilled locally made chicken sausages and guests brought this yummy German noodle concoction. All with salad, and baked apple goodness with ice cream for dessert. The odd beer was quaffed here and there.
Posted by: stevestory on Oct. 24 2008,21:52

I was making curry chicken tonight and it was going fine until i absolutely ruined it in the end. First I sauteed some diced chicken breast, onion, and garlic. Then I added about 2 tsp curry powder, a little cumin, salt, cayenne powder, and pepper. and 2 cups water, and was reducing that. Then I decide it's too watery and I mix about 1/3rd cup corn starch with 1/2 cup water and stir that in. Total, instant, disaster. The whole thing turned to this kind of watery jelly. Just a really gross consistency and nothing i could do. Better luck next time.
Posted by: Crabby Appleton on Oct. 27 2008,18:55

Quote (stevestory @ Oct. 21 2008,23:31)
So gradually over the past year I've been doing grilled cheese experiments. the bread's pretty standard white bread. The coating on the outside has been variable (Promise, Smart Balance, olive oil, or whipped butter) and hasn't made too much diff. But the cheese...I'm now thinking the lowbrow approach might be better. So far I've used, for cheese, slices of provolone, swiss, mozarella, or muenster. And the results have all been unsatisfactory. I'm starting to think the lowbrow approach, aka those fake cheese slices like Kraft singles, which are I think mostly vegetable oil, would work better. The real cheese melts but is too stiff. The fake cheese gets gooier and I'm thinking that might actually be better.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Steve, try grating your high quality cheese and using cream cheese or softened queso fresca as a binder. A little binder goes a long way. Monterey Jack might work well as a binder too, I love toasted Pepper Jack sammiches.
Posted by: Crabby Appleton on Oct. 27 2008,19:01

Quote (C.J.O'Brien @ Oct. 22 2008,01:43)
baked apple goodness with ice cream for dessert.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------



Works well on the grill, too.
Posted by: stevestory on Oct. 27 2008,19:06

Quote (Crabby Appleton @ Oct. 27 2008,19:55)
Steve, try grating your high quality cheese and using cream cheese or softened queso fresca as a binder. A little binder goes a long way. Monterey Jack might work well as a binder too, I love toasted Pepper Jack sammiches.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


thanks for the tips!
Posted by: Bing on Oct. 27 2008,19:18

Oh geez, I completely forgot about this thread.

So back at the beginning of the month we threw a little birthday party for Alexander Keith.  He was 213 on October 5th.

Got a keg of Keith's, had a few bottles of whisky and all was good.  On the nosh side we served Jigg's dinner (corned beef & cabbage), some salmon, Steak and Guinness pie, neeps & tatties, mushie peas.

Celtic music and more whisky for afters.  Unfortunately some miscreants decided that The Macallan Fine Oak 15 yo ($125/bottle), Lagavulin 16 yo ($115/bottle ) and my Highland Park 30 yo ($399) would make excellent shooters.  Sadly all are now but a memory.

< Here are some pictures. >
Posted by: Arden Chatfield on Oct. 27 2008,19:21

Quote (stevestory @ Oct. 24 2008,19:52)
I was making curry chicken tonight and it was going fine until i absolutely ruined it in the end. First I sauteed some diced chicken breast, onion, and garlic. Then I added about 2 tsp curry powder, a little cumin, salt, cayenne powder, and pepper. and 2 cups water, and was reducing that. Then I decide it's too watery
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Just cook it half an hour with the lid off. Fixes that right up.

Also, in my experience, with curries dark meat like chicken thighs works better, tho I guess that's pretty subjective.
Posted by: Crabby Appleton on Oct. 27 2008,19:32

With cooler weather coming in, I made a pot of Split Pea Soup this weekend.

1 lb. of split peas, 3/4 lb. ham diced, 8 large carrots sliced, 4 stalks celery sliced, 1 large onion diced, 6 minced cloves of garlic, 7 cups of water and the secret ingredient, the drippings from a smoked beer butt chicken. Salty from the dry rub and  with an intense smoky flavor, this ingredient turns the pedestrian into the sublime.

Low boil all the ingredients for 30 mins, stirring several times, then reduce the heat for another 10 mins to thicken.

Stick to your ribs goodness.
Posted by: Crabby Appleton on Oct. 27 2008,19:51

Quote (Arden Chatfield @ Oct. 27 2008,19:21)
Quote (stevestory @ Oct. 24 2008,19:52)
I was making curry chicken tonight and it was going fine until i absolutely ruined it in the end. First I sauteed some diced chicken breast, onion, and garlic. Then I added about 2 tsp curry powder, a little cumin, salt, cayenne powder, and pepper. and 2 cups water, and was reducing that. Then I decide it's too watery
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Just cook it half an hour with the lid off. Fixes that right up.

Also, in my experience, with curries dark meat like chicken thighs works better, tho I guess that's pretty subjective.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


I agree with the bold part, but remove the meat while you're doing it so it isn't overcooked.

I'm a big fan of dark meat too which is why I cook a lot of duck.

The big treat with cooking duck is the rendered fat.

Cottage Fried Potatoes cooked in duck fat ROCKS! Scrambled eggs with tomato, mild pepper, garlic, chives and diced smoked pork chops, ooh I could go on.
Posted by: khan on Oct. 27 2008,20:09

Quote (Crabby Appleton @ Oct. 27 2008,20:51)
Quote (Arden Chatfield @ Oct. 27 2008,19:21)
 
Quote (stevestory @ Oct. 24 2008,19:52)
I was making curry chicken tonight and it was going fine until i absolutely ruined it in the end. First I sauteed some diced chicken breast, onion, and garlic. Then I added about 2 tsp curry powder, a little cumin, salt, cayenne powder, and pepper. and 2 cups water, and was reducing that. Then I decide it's too watery
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Just cook it half an hour with the lid off. Fixes that right up.

Also, in my experience, with curries dark meat like chicken thighs works better, tho I guess that's pretty subjective.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


I agree with the bold part, but remove the meat while you're doing it so it isn't overcooked.

I'm a big fan of dark meat too which is why I cook a lot of duck.

The big treat with cooking duck is the rendered fat.

Cottage Fried Potatoes cooked in <b>duck fat</b> ROCKS! Scrambled eggs with tomato, mild pepper, garlic, chives and diced smoked pork chops, ooh I could go on.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Goose fat is also great, especially for potatoes.
Posted by: Arden Chatfield on Oct. 27 2008,20:17

Quote (khan @ Oct. 27 2008,18:09)
Quote (Crabby Appleton @ Oct. 27 2008,20:51)
Quote (Arden Chatfield @ Oct. 27 2008,19:21)
 
Quote (stevestory @ Oct. 24 2008,19:52)
I was making curry chicken tonight and it was going fine until i absolutely ruined it in the end. First I sauteed some diced chicken breast, onion, and garlic. Then I added about 2 tsp curry powder, a little cumin, salt, cayenne powder, and pepper. and 2 cups water, and was reducing that. Then I decide it's too watery
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Just cook it half an hour with the lid off. Fixes that right up.

Also, in my experience, with curries dark meat like chicken thighs works better, tho I guess that's pretty subjective.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


I agree with the bold part, but remove the meat while you're doing it so it isn't overcooked.

I'm a big fan of dark meat too which is why I cook a lot of duck.

The big treat with cooking duck is the rendered fat.

Cottage Fried Potatoes cooked in <b>duck fat</b> ROCKS! Scrambled eggs with tomato, mild pepper, garlic, chives and diced smoked pork chops, ooh I could go on.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Goose fat is also great, especially for potatoes.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Potatoes with goose fat with sounds like something peasants would eat in Slovenia in the 1890s.  :O  

< (Oh, speaking of scary eastern European peasant cuisine...) >
Posted by: Crabby Appleton on Oct. 27 2008,20:50

Quote (C.J.O'Brien @ Oct. 22 2008,01:43)
this yummy German noodle concoction.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Spätzle?

Mrs. Crabby used to make these but hasn't in a long time.
Posted by: Crabby Appleton on Oct. 27 2008,21:00

Quote (khan @ Oct. 27 2008,20:09)
Quote (Crabby Appleton @ Oct. 27 2008,20:51)
Quote (Arden Chatfield @ Oct. 27 2008,19:21)
 
Quote (stevestory @ Oct. 24 2008,19:52)
I was making curry chicken tonight and it was going fine until i absolutely ruined it in the end. First I sauteed some diced chicken breast, onion, and garlic. Then I added about 2 tsp curry powder, a little cumin, salt, cayenne powder, and pepper. and 2 cups water, and was reducing that. Then I decide it's too watery
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Just cook it half an hour with the lid off. Fixes that right up.

Also, in my experience, with curries dark meat like chicken thighs works better, tho I guess that's pretty subjective.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


I agree with the bold part, but remove the meat while you're doing it so it isn't overcooked.

I'm a big fan of dark meat too which is why I cook a lot of duck.

The big treat with cooking duck is the rendered fat.

Cottage Fried Potatoes cooked in duck fat ROCKS! Scrambled eggs with tomato, mild pepper, garlic, chives and diced smoked pork chops, ooh I could go on.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Goose fat is also great, especially for potatoes.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------




Finishing off the Cottage Fries Mrs. Crabby made yesterday!

I can't get goose fat unless I hunt/shoot the bird myself.

Maple Leaf Farms produce a delectable duck raised by Amish farmers that I can buy in the local market.
Posted by: Crabby Appleton on Oct. 27 2008,21:18

If you live close enough to Kansas City to get Boulevard Brewing beers (Missouri's second largest brewer) give Bob's 47 a try.



It's their fall seasonal beer, a Munich style lager. Not as good as their springtime Irish Ale, but still a very good brew.
Posted by: Tony M Nyphot on Oct. 27 2008,21:26

Quote (stevestory @ Oct. 21 2008,22:31)
So gradually over the past year I've been doing grilled cheese experiments. the bread's pretty standard white bread. The coating on the outside has been variable (Promise, Smart Balance, olive oil, or whipped butter) and hasn't made too much diff. But the cheese...I'm now thinking the lowbrow approach might be better. So far I've used, for cheese, slices of provolone, swiss, mozarella, or muenster. And the results have all been unsatisfactory. I'm starting to think the lowbrow approach, aka those fake cheese slices like Kraft singles, which are I think mostly vegetable oil, would work better. The real cheese melts but is too stiff. The fake cheese gets gooier and I'm thinking that might actually be better.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


I like to think I make some of the best cheese sammiches around and the gf (mine, not yours) agrees. I'm not sure what your gf would think, but Arden's mum and Louis' better-3/4 both like them.

I use a medium or extra sharp cheddar (usually Tillamook) cut in very thin slices and normally mix in some finely shredded asiago, parmesan and mozzarella. ( I have to try Crabbie's cream cheese binder next time.)

I have a small sandwich-size, enamel covered cast-iron frying pan pre-heated at a medium-high temp, throw a pat of butter in to melt, swish it around and swipe it clean with a slice of the bread, then repeat for the other slice. Place the whole sandwich in, cover with a lid and fry for 3 minutes per side. Crispy bread and perfectly melted cheese every time.

Sometimes I'll even use pumpernickel with swiss, muenster and some black forest smoked ham and a bit of stone-ground mustard.

Since sourdough is a hobby of mine, I believe superior bread makes a huge difference. Here's a semolina sourdough with non-segregated sesame seeds on top:



Posted by: stevestory on Oct. 27 2008,21:28

Quote (Arden Chatfield @ Oct. 27 2008,20:21)
Quote (stevestory @ Oct. 24 2008,19:52)
I was making curry chicken tonight and it was going fine until i absolutely ruined it in the end. First I sauteed some diced chicken breast, onion, and garlic. Then I added about 2 tsp curry powder, a little cumin, salt, cayenne powder, and pepper. and 2 cups water, and was reducing that. Then I decide it's too watery
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Just cook it half an hour with the lid off. Fixes that right up.

Also, in my experience, with curries dark meat like chicken thighs works better, tho I guess that's pretty subjective.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Yeah, i know that now. Not going with the corn starch again. Last night I made it, and did everything same as before, except added a can of diced tomatoes. I really liked the result. I've seen other recipes that involve stirring in yogurt at the end. Anyone got any comment on that?
Posted by: stevestory on Oct. 27 2008,21:32

hmm. i'll also have to try Tony's suggestions.
Posted by: Tony M Nyphot on Oct. 27 2008,21:44

Quote (Arden Chatfield @ Oct. 27 2008,19:17)
< (Oh, speaking of scary eastern European peasant cuisine...) >
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


How does that compare taste-wise with our southern favorite of < Scrapple >? I've heard it's hog awful offal.

There's always Armour Pork Brains in Milk Gravy, supplying 1200% of your daily cholesterol in a single serving, too.

Doesn't have much Spam in it. Not so much rat, either.
Posted by: Crabby Appleton on Oct. 27 2008,21:49

That bread looks awesome/toothsome!
Posted by: Arden Chatfield on Oct. 27 2008,22:00

Quote (stevestory @ Oct. 27 2008,19:28)
   
Quote (Arden Chatfield @ Oct. 27 2008,20:21)
   
Quote (stevestory @ Oct. 24 2008,19:52)
I was making curry chicken tonight and it was going fine until i absolutely ruined it in the end. First I sauteed some diced chicken breast, onion, and garlic. Then I added about 2 tsp curry powder, a little cumin, salt, cayenne powder, and pepper. and 2 cups water, and was reducing that. Then I decide it's too watery
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Just cook it half an hour with the lid off. Fixes that right up.

Also, in my experience, with curries dark meat like chicken thighs works better, tho I guess that's pretty subjective.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Yeah, i know that now. Not going with the corn starch again. Last night I made it, and did everything same as before, except added a can of diced tomatoes. I really liked the result. I've seen other recipes that involve stirring in yogurt at the end. Anyone got any comment on that?
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Some of the Patak's Curry pastes call for yogurt, especially this one (which I recommend)*:



Tho that recipe suggests you marinade the chicken with the paste and the yogurt anywhere from an hour to a day beforehand.

The yogurt is mostly just to give a certain consistency to the sauce. I'm not that big on putting tomatoes into curries, tho YMMV.

*this particular paste qualifies as what I would call 'mild', tho there are all kinds of ways of heating it up.
Posted by: stevestory on Oct. 27 2008,22:11

I can understand stirring the yogurt in at the end, but if you marinate it in the yogurt and then cook it, won't the yogurt curdle?
Posted by: Arden Chatfield on Oct. 27 2008,22:38

Quote (stevestory @ Oct. 27 2008,20:11)
I can understand stirring the yogurt in at the end, but if you marinate it in the yogurt and then cook it, won't the yogurt curdle?
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


No, it doesn't, it works fine. Probably because you're sposta marinate the whole thing in the fridge. Or maybe some weird chemicals in the spices prevent it.
Posted by: stevestory on Oct. 29 2008,03:10

Perhaps you are telling the truth...or maybe you're just leading me down a trail of heartache

:angry:

I've got my eye on you, Chatfield.


Posted by: stevestory on Oct. 29 2008,03:17

LOL I'm about to lead myself down a trail of headache. Bohemian Highway does have a very pretty label, though, and is available at many of your finer gas stations.

(Judge me all you want, I spent all afternoon tutoring a bunch of kids for the ACT, so you can all stuff it)
Posted by: Louis on Oct. 29 2008,03:39

Quote (stevestory @ Oct. 29 2008,09:17)
LOL I'm about to lead myself down a trail of headache. Bohemian Highway does have a very pretty label, though, and is available at many of your finer gas stations.

(Judge me all you want, I spent all afternoon tutoring a bunch of kids for the ACT, so you can all stuff it)
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Judge? Never.

Join you in the gutter with a bottle wrapped in brown paper? You betcha.

You've had students, I've had moody French collaborators again. I swear they are contagious.

Louis
Posted by: stevestory on Oct. 29 2008,03:49

Quote (Louis @ Oct. 29 2008,04:39)
Judge? Never.

Join you in the gutter with a bottle wrapped in brown paper? You betcha.

You've had students, I've had moody French collaborators again. I swear they are contagious.

Louis
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Well, I don't have any brown paper for the bottles, and we'll have to substitute watching Buffy DVDs in the house for lying in a gutter, but otherwise, you're on. We'll just have to keep the sound down so we don't wake Arden's mom.
Posted by: Arden Chatfield on Oct. 29 2008,09:53

Quote (stevestory @ Oct. 29 2008,01:49)
Quote (Louis @ Oct. 29 2008,04:39)
Judge? Never.

Join you in the gutter with a bottle wrapped in brown paper? You betcha.

You've had students, I've had moody French collaborators again. I swear they are contagious.

Louis
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Well, I don't have any brown paper for the bottles, and we'll have to substitute watching Buffy DVDs in the house for lying in a gutter, but otherwise, you're on. We'll just have to keep the sound down so we don't wake Arden's mom.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


It's my dad you have to watch out for. If he finds out you jagoffs are on his lawn, he'll be way pissed.  :angry:

Now if you don't mind, Louis's mom is expecting me.
Posted by: Alan Fox on Oct. 29 2008,10:01



---------------------QUOTE-------------------
No, it doesn't, it works fine. Probably because you're sposta marinate the whole thing in the fridge. Or maybe some weird chemicals in the spices prevent it.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------



It does work fine. You add the yoghourt before adding other liquid or stock, and in smallish dollops, stirring it in to the mix while heating it. You can then add water, stock or tomatoes to obtain the required consistency, and reduce back to required thickness if you add too much liquid. Creamed coconut (I guess this is available in the US) is also a good thickener in the appropriate curry. You can also make real coconut milk by grating the fresh flesh and extracting using boiling water. It thickens and tastes great but is a bit fiddly!

No need to thank me. Just answer the following:

We have a group called the "country club", where we have dinner at someone's house based on the cuisine of a country selected at random from a hat. This month it is the US . Does anyone have a recipe for an interesting or unusual US dish with which I could astonish* my friends?

*preferably in a good way.
Posted by: carlsonjok on Oct. 29 2008,10:16

Quote (Alan Fox @ Oct. 29 2008,10:01)
We have a group called the "country club", where we have dinner at someone's house based on the cuisine of a country selected at random from a hat. This month it is the US . Does anyone have a recipe for an interesting or unusual US dish with which I could astonish* my friends?

*preferably in a good way.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Well, if takeout from McDonalds isn't what you had in mind, I would suggest chicken fried steak with cream gravy, mashed potatoes and collard greens.
Posted by: Arden Chatfield on Oct. 29 2008,10:32

Quote (Alan Fox @ Oct. 29 2008,08:01)
We have a group called the "country club", where we have dinner at someone's house based on the cuisine of a country selected at random from a hat. This month it is the US . Does anyone have a recipe for an interesting or unusual US dish with which I could astonish* my friends?

*preferably in a good way.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


You can't go wrong with the basics. I can't imagine any of your European friends has ever eaten it:


Posted by: Alan Fox on Oct. 29 2008,10:58

Thanks, Arden.

I googled and found a recipe for scrapple. A couple of things make me wonder. It appears to be normally served at breakfast, and the last line of the recipe I read says:

---------------------QUOTE-------------------
It is in-arguably and unfathomably vile.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Posted by: Alan Fox on Oct. 29 2008,11:07

Carlson

Chicken-fried steak sounds a bit like Wiener Schnitzel using beef instead of veal. Do you recommend it?
Posted by: carlsonjok on Oct. 29 2008,11:21

Quote (Alan Fox @ Oct. 29 2008,11:07)
Carlson

Chicken-fried steak sounds a bit like Wiener Schnitzel using beef instead of veal. Do you recommend it?
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


There are differences between a chicken fried steak and wiener schnitzel, but I am not sure they are great enough to make it worth the effort.

If I was going to cook a meal here for furriners, I'd probably smoke some ribs and serve it up with alot of beans, potato salad, and fried okra.  But, you probably don't have a smoker and can you even get okra over there in the old country?

You know, I am sitting here and cannot really think of any peculiarly American food.  Most of our cuisine is derived from some other ethnicity.  Even scrapple.

For some reason, this  reminds me of a scene from Pulp Fiction.


---------------------QUOTE-------------------
Esmeralda: What is your name?
Butch: Butch.
Esmeralda: What does it mean?
Butch: I'm American, honey. Our names don't mean shit.

---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Posted by: Erasmus, FCD on Oct. 29 2008,11:30

WHAT NO AMURIKAN FOOD?  BY GOD YOU SISSIES PROBABLY TRY TO REWRITE THE CONSTITUTION TO

ramps!  speckled trout!  Boletus bicolor!  Herycium!  madeola virginica!  Sparassis crispa!  squirrel and dumplings!  Moxostoma patties (do grind them first, bony bastards)!  Branch lettuce!  

USA USA USA USA USA USA USA
Posted by: Arden Chatfield on Oct. 29 2008,11:37

Quote (carlsonjok @ Oct. 29 2008,09:21)
You know, I am sitting here and cannot really think of any peculiarly American food.  Most of our cuisine is derived from some other ethnicity.  Even scrapple.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


I would recommend lots of corn dishes, but technically that's Mexico, as are tomatoes and chocolate.

So if you're insisting on some strict notion of North American, pre-Columbian purity, then go with buffalo burgers and wild rice, like they serve at powwows. Maybe some acorn mush just for variety.
Posted by: Alan Fox on Oct. 29 2008,11:44



---------------------QUOTE-------------------
But, you probably don't have a smoker
---------------------QUOTE-------------------

True

---------------------QUOTE-------------------
...and can you even get okra over there in the old country?
---------------------QUOTE-------------------

Sure
Posted by: carlsonjok on Oct. 29 2008,12:25

Quote (Erasmus @ FCD,Oct. 29 2008,11:30)
WHAT NO AMURIKAN FOOD?  BY GOD YOU SISSIES PROBABLY TRY TO REWRITE THE CONSTITUTION TO

ramps!  speckled trout!  Boletus bicolor!  Herycium!  madeola virginica!  Sparassis crispa!  squirrel and dumplings!  Moxostoma patties (do grind them first, bony bastards)!  Branch lettuce!  

USA USA USA USA USA USA USA
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


HA HA THIS IS YOU


Posted by: Arden Chatfield on Oct. 29 2008,12:35

Quote (carlsonjok @ Oct. 29 2008,09:21)
can you even get okra over there in the old country?
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Okra (bhindi) is a big deal in Indian cooking. There's a little Pakistani place here that does a spicy okra dish that will rock your world.

Wikipedia says it's originally from Ethiopia.
Posted by: carlsonjok on Oct. 29 2008,12:47

Quote (Arden Chatfield @ Oct. 29 2008,12:35)
Quote (carlsonjok @ Oct. 29 2008,09:21)
can you even get okra over there in the old country?
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Okra (bhindi) is a big deal in Indian cooking. There's a little Pakistani place here that does a spicy okra dish that will rock your world.

Wikipedia says it's originally from Ethiopia.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Dang it, that's right.  There was an Indian restaurant on High St in Columbus, when I lived there, that made an excellent okra and tomatoes dish.  Mibad.
Posted by: Louis on Oct. 29 2008,13:57

Quote (stevestory @ Oct. 29 2008,09:49)
Quote (Louis @ Oct. 29 2008,04:39)
Judge? Never.

Join you in the gutter with a bottle wrapped in brown paper? You betcha.

You've had students, I've had moody French collaborators again. I swear they are contagious.

Louis
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Well, I don't have any brown paper for the bottles, and we'll have to substitute watching Buffy DVDs in the house for lying in a gutter, but otherwise, you're on. We'll just have to keep the sound down so we don't wake Arden's mom.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Buffy DVDs? I'm there! I have this fantasy about Buffy/Louis/Willow threesome, some hot wax and an array of motorised accessories.....mmmmm pervalicious.

I'll keep the noise down, I don't want that Behemoth to wake up and spoil me ogling the nice women. Is she still chained in the pit?

Louis
Posted by: Louis on Oct. 29 2008,13:59

Quote (Arden Chatfield @ Oct. 29 2008,15:53)
Quote (stevestory @ Oct. 29 2008,01:49)
Quote (Louis @ Oct. 29 2008,04:39)
Judge? Never.

Join you in the gutter with a bottle wrapped in brown paper? You betcha.

You've had students, I've had moody French collaborators again. I swear they are contagious.

Louis
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Well, I don't have any brown paper for the bottles, and we'll have to substitute watching Buffy DVDs in the house for lying in a gutter, but otherwise, you're on. We'll just have to keep the sound down so we don't wake Arden's mom.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


It's my dad you have to watch out for. If he finds out you jagoffs are on his lawn, he'll be way pissed.  :angry:

Now if you don't mind, Louis's mom is expecting me.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Awwww is oo sad oo doesn't have an invite?

Your bitterness and envy, it amuses me.

Louis
Posted by: Arden Chatfield on Oct. 29 2008,14:11

Quote (Louis @ Oct. 29 2008,11:59)

Awwww is oo sad oo doesn't have an invite?

---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Erm, no, I'm cool with not having been invited to hang with you guys. Trust me.



Posted by: k.e.. on Oct. 29 2008,14:19

Quote (carlsonjok @ Oct. 29 2008,20:25)
Quote (Erasmus @ FCD,Oct. 29 2008,11:30)
WHAT NO AMURIKAN FOOD?  BY GOD YOU SISSIES PROBABLY TRY TO REWRITE THE CONSTITUTION TO

ramps!  speckled trout!  Boletus bicolor!  Herycium!  madeola virginica!  Sparassis crispa!  squirrel and dumplings!  Moxostoma patties (do grind them first, bony bastards)!  Branch lettuce!  

USA USA USA USA USA USA USA
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


HA HA THIS IS YOU


---------------------QUOTE-------------------


SO?
Posted by: Louis on Oct. 29 2008,15:03

Quote (Arden Chatfield @ Oct. 29 2008,20:11)
Quote (Louis @ Oct. 29 2008,11:59)

Awwww is oo sad oo doesn't have an invite?

---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Erm, no, I'm cool with not having been invited to hang with you guys. Trust me.



---------------------QUOTE-------------------


But we're not watching the Simpsons.....OH! Are you trying to imply that those guys in the picture are us? Ummmm, I hate to mention it but if Steve and I were hanging out together there would be TWO of us, not THREE.

I realise that this borders on postgraduate level mathematics to someone like yourself, but do try harder, ok then champ? Yeah, you're a good boy, champ, well done, well done.

Louis
Posted by: Arden Chatfield on Oct. 29 2008,15:13

Quote (Louis @ Oct. 29 2008,13:03)
But we're not watching the Simpsons.....OH! Are you trying to imply that those guys in the picture are us? Ummmm, I hate to mention it but if Steve and I were hanging out together there would be TWO of us, not THREE.

I realise that this borders on postgraduate level mathematics to someone like yourself, but do try harder, ok then champ? Yeah, you're a good boy, champ, well done, well done.

Louis
---------------------QUOTE-------------------



Posted by: Erasmus, FCD on Oct. 29 2008,15:14

Quote (k.e.. @ Oct. 29 2008,14:19)
Quote (carlsonjok @ Oct. 29 2008,20:25)
Quote (Erasmus @ FCD,Oct. 29 2008,11:30)
WHAT NO AMURIKAN FOOD?  BY GOD YOU SISSIES PROBABLY TRY TO REWRITE THE CONSTITUTION TO

ramps!  speckled trout!  Boletus bicolor!  Herycium!  madeola virginica!  Sparassis crispa!  squirrel and dumplings!  Moxostoma patties (do grind them first, bony bastards)!  Branch lettuce!  

USA USA USA USA USA USA USA
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


HA HA THIS IS YOU


---------------------QUOTE-------------------


SO?
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


precisely my point.  So?

she's kinda hot here.  if you go for the Lou Dobbs slightly out of focus type.

Posted by: stevestory on Oct. 29 2008,15:28

Quote (Arden Chatfield @ Oct. 29 2008,16:13)
Quote (Louis @ Oct. 29 2008,13:03)
But we're not watching the Simpsons.....OH! Are you trying to imply that those guys in the picture are us? Ummmm, I hate to mention it but if Steve and I were hanging out together there would be TWO of us, not THREE.

I realise that this borders on postgraduate level mathematics to someone like yourself, but do try harder, ok then champ? Yeah, you're a good boy, champ, well done, well done.

Louis
---------------------QUOTE-------------------



---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Hey! Even I know not to button that top button.
Posted by: carlsonjok on Oct. 29 2008,15:37

Quote (Arden Chatfield @ Oct. 29 2008,15:13)

---------------------QUOTE-------------------



Posted by: Louis on Oct. 29 2008,15:41

Quote (Arden Chatfield @ Oct. 29 2008,21:13)
Quote (Louis @ Oct. 29 2008,13:03)
But we're not watching the Simpsons.....OH! Are you trying to imply that those guys in the picture are us? Ummmm, I hate to mention it but if Steve and I were hanging out together there would be TWO of us, not THREE.

I realise that this borders on postgraduate level mathematics to someone like yourself, but do try harder, ok then champ? Yeah, you're a good boy, champ, well done, well done.

Louis
---------------------QUOTE-------------------



---------------------QUOTE-------------------


I don't wear glasses. Other than that....sorry, but what's to be offended by?

Is being well read and intelligent some kind of insult where you come from.......oh wait, you're American, book learnin' is some kind of elitist conspiracy right?

Louis
Posted by: Arden Chatfield on Oct. 29 2008,15:46

Quote (carlsonjok @ Oct. 29 2008,13:37)
 
Quote (Arden Chatfield @ Oct. 29 2008,15:13)

---------------------QUOTE-------------------



---------------------QUOTE-------------------



Posted by: Arden Chatfield on Oct. 29 2008,15:53

Quote (Louis @ Oct. 29 2008,13:41)
I don't wear glasses.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------



Oh, very well then:


Posted by: carlsonjok on Oct. 29 2008,16:03

Quote (Arden Chatfield @ Oct. 29 2008,15:53)
Quote (Louis @ Oct. 29 2008,13:41)
I don't wear glasses.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------



Oh, very well then:


---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Not bad, but a little predictable and formulaic. If we are going to stick with the Simpson's theme, I would have done something with the < Big Book of British Smiles >.
Posted by: Arden Chatfield on Oct. 29 2008,16:20

Quote (carlsonjok @ Oct. 29 2008,14:03)

Not bad, but a little predictable and formulaic. If we are going to stick with the Simpson's theme, I would have done something with the < Big Book of British Smiles >.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


You're completely right. I apologize.


Posted by: Louis on Oct. 29 2008,17:37

Quote (Arden Chatfield @ Oct. 29 2008,22:20)
Quote (carlsonjok @ Oct. 29 2008,14:03)

Not bad, but a little predictable and formulaic. If we are going to stick with the Simpson's theme, I would have done something with the < Big Book of British Smiles >.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


You're completely right. I apologize.


---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Most amusing. Still "route one" abuse, however, we feel the artistic style marks are going to be low, and here are the marks from the judges:

4.5, 3.2, 2.1, 3.4, and 3.1, giving Chatfield a total of 16.3, enough to keep him out of the medals.

It looks like the Iraqi judge was generous, probably some kind of puppet regime there, and the Iranian judge was unusually harsh, we may have to watch him.

Louis
Posted by: khan on Oct. 29 2008,18:11

Quote (Arden Chatfield @ Oct. 29 2008,13:35)
Quote (carlsonjok @ Oct. 29 2008,09:21)
can you even get okra over there in the old country?
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Okra (bhindi) is a big deal in Indian cooking. There's a little Pakistani place here that does a spicy okra dish that will rock your world.

Wikipedia says it's originally from Ethiopia.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Is okra really food, or is it all some sort of joke?
Posted by: Louis on Oct. 29 2008,18:15

Quote (khan @ Oct. 30 2008,00:11)
Quote (Arden Chatfield @ Oct. 29 2008,13:35)
Quote (carlsonjok @ Oct. 29 2008,09:21)
can you even get okra over there in the old country?
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Okra (bhindi) is a big deal in Indian cooking. There's a little Pakistani place here that does a spicy okra dish that will rock your world.

Wikipedia says it's originally from Ethiopia.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Is okra really food, or is it all some sort of joke?
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


TEECH TEH CONTRUVERSEE!!!!!!!!oneelevenshiftone!!!11!!111!!!!!

Okra: Real materialist vegetable or divine seed bearing thingy?

Louis
Posted by: stevestory on Oct. 29 2008,18:36

Quote (khan @ Oct. 29 2008,19:11)
Quote (Arden Chatfield @ Oct. 29 2008,13:35)
Quote (carlsonjok @ Oct. 29 2008,09:21)
can you even get okra over there in the old country?
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Okra (bhindi) is a big deal in Indian cooking. There's a little Pakistani place here that does a spicy okra dish that will rock your world.

Wikipedia says it's originally from Ethiopia.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Is okra really food, or is it all some sort of joke?
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Considering I had it, breaded and fried, at Cracker Barrel this weekend, it better be food.
Posted by: stevestory on Oct. 29 2008,19:34

Okay. Today's curry chicken went better. I chopped up half an onion and sauteed it in olive oil. Then I added 2 cups of water and a diced chicken breast. Then 1 cup chunky spaghetti sauce for the tomatoes and sugar. Then about

1 Tbsp curry powder
1 tsp cayenne powder
1 tsp garlic powder
1 tsp butter

and for a little sourness,

1 tsp lime juice
1 tsp balsamic vinegar

and got all that simmering and reduced it for about 45 mins. Result: not bad! Next time I'll try the yogurt business.
Posted by: Arden Chatfield on Oct. 29 2008,20:56

Quote (stevestory @ Oct. 29 2008,17:34)
Okay. Today's curry chicken went better. I chopped up half an onion and sauteed it in olive oil. Then I added 2 cups of water and a diced chicken breast. Then 1 cup chunky spaghetti sauce for the tomatoes and sugar. Then about

1 Tbsp curry powder
1 tsp cayenne powder
1 tsp garlic powder
1 tsp butter

and for a little sourness,

1 tsp lime juice
1 tsp balsamic vinegar

and got all that simmering and reduced it for about 45 mins. Result: not bad! Next time I'll try the yogurt business.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


You put a cup of spaghetti sauce in a curry? ? ? ? ? :O

Good lord, just buy a can of crushed or diced maters!!!!
Posted by: Erasmus, FCD on Oct. 29 2008,20:57

jerry clower said that when he was a-comin on they used to eat so much boiled okra he couldn't keep his socks pulled up.
Posted by: stevestory on Oct. 29 2008,21:11

Quote (Arden Chatfield @ Oct. 29 2008,21:56)
You put a cup of spaghetti sauce in a curry? ? ? ? ? :O

Good lord, just buy a can of crushed or diced maters!!!!
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


What's the diff? Spaghetti sauce is just crushed maters with sugar.
Posted by: stevestory on Oct. 29 2008,21:30

what i was really psyched about was the knife. My kitchen knives had fallen into disrepair and dullness, and I finally dragged out the whetstones and put about a 25º edge on them. It cut through the chicken and onion like they were warm butter.
Posted by: Arden Chatfield on Oct. 29 2008,21:33

Quote (stevestory @ Oct. 29 2008,19:11)
 
Quote (Arden Chatfield @ Oct. 29 2008,21:56)
You put a cup of spaghetti sauce in a curry? ? ? ? ? :O

Good lord, just buy a can of crushed or diced maters!!!!
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


What's the diff? Spaghetti sauce is just crushed maters with sugar.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


It's more than just maters and sugar. Plus, do you really want sugar and oregano in your curry??

Lord, punk kids, lawn, grumble...
Posted by: stevestory on Oct. 29 2008,21:40

chunky ragu ingredients according to label:



---------------------QUOTE-------------------
tomato puree (water, tomato paste), diced tomatoes in puree, onions, sugar, soybean oil, salt, spices, garlic powder, natural flavors.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------



Take that, Chatfield!
Posted by: Arden Chatfield on Oct. 29 2008,22:55

Quote (stevestory @ Oct. 29 2008,19:40)
chunky ragu ingredients according to label:

   

---------------------QUOTE-------------------
tomato puree (water, tomato paste), diced tomatoes in puree, onions, sugar, soybean oil, salt, spices, garlic powder, natural flavors.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------



Take that, Chatfield!
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


You're right, Steve. I shouldn't make fun. Why, in five years, everyone might be enjoying the exciting new Italian curries you've invented.













**cough**
Posted by: Alan Fox on Oct. 30 2008,10:16

OK we're going with the smoked ribs and she-devil mopping sauce. So as not to offend Arden and his mum over the scrapple, we are looking at his suggestion for a corn-based accompaniment.

PS to Steve.

Try:

Clarified butter (melt and pour clear liquid off milky residue). Use liquid, discard residue. Fry chicken and  plenty of  sliced onion gently in the butter, add fresh garlic, then dry spices (try mixing your own selection). Add yoghourt in spoonfuls, stirring to prevent separating, then add tomatoes. Even better, save tomatoes from the garden, cook down with a little onion and garlic, blend and bottle up and use when necessary.
Posted by: carlsonjok on Oct. 30 2008,10:20

Quote (Alan Fox @ Oct. 30 2008,10:16)
OK we're going with the smoked ribs and she-devil mopping sauce.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Sweet. Pork ribs, I am assuming?  Did you locate a smoker?
Posted by: Alan Fox on Oct. 30 2008,10:41

Quote (carlsonjok @ Oct. 30 2008,05:20)
Quote (Alan Fox @ Oct. 30 2008,10:16)
OK we're going with the smoked ribs and she-devil mopping sauce.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Sweet. Pork ribs, I am assuming?  Did you locate a smoker?
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Pork, indeed.

We have a hooded gas-fired barbecue and we can add some wood chips. I will experiment with a small sample, I think.
Posted by: khan on Oct. 30 2008,18:15

Last month (never shop before breakfast) I bought a jar of ghee.

What shall I do with it?
Posted by: Louis on Oct. 30 2008,18:20

Quote (khan @ Oct. 31 2008,00:15)
Last month (never shop before breakfast) I bought a jar of ghee.

What shall I do with it?
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Ghee is merely clarified butter so I shall provide you with 3 options:

1) Fry some onions in it and use them to make a delicious curry or accompaniment to a steak etc.

2) Use it to make a very lovely pudding, I suggest a good old fashion bread and butter pudding with a slight twist: use brioche for the bread, chocolate chips and soak the brioche in Grand Marnier.

3) Umm, well it is quite slippery, so you could use it for "marital" purposes*.

Louis

*Put it on the door knob so that the kids can't get into the room. Why, what did you think I meant?
Posted by: khan on Oct. 30 2008,18:42

Quote (Louis @ Oct. 30 2008,19:20)
Quote (khan @ Oct. 31 2008,00:15)
Last month (never shop before breakfast) I bought a jar of ghee.

What shall I do with it?
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Ghee is merely clarified butter so I shall provide you with 3 options:

1) Fry some onions in it and use them to make a delicious curry or accompaniment to a steak etc.

2) Use it to make a very lovely pudding, I suggest a good old fashion bread and butter pudding with a slight twist: use brioche for the bread, chocolate chips and soak the brioche in Grand Marnier.

3) Umm, well it is quite slippery, so you could use it for "marital" purposes*.

Louis

*Put it on the door knob so that the kids can't get into the room. Why, what did you think I meant?
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


All that aside, how is ghee for deep frying?
Posted by: Bing on Oct. 31 2008,04:55

Quote (Arden Chatfield @ Oct. 29 2008,22:55)
Quote (stevestory @ Oct. 29 2008,19:40)
chunky ragu ingredients according to label:

     

---------------------QUOTE-------------------
tomato puree (water, tomato paste), diced tomatoes in puree, onions, sugar, soybean oil, salt, spices, garlic powder, natural flavors.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------



Take that, Chatfield!
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


You're right, Steve. I shouldn't make fun. Why, in five years, everyone might be enjoying the exciting new Italian curries you've invented.













**cough**
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


I thought the same thing.  Olive oil??  Chunky Ragu?? Balsamic vinegar??

Next we'll find out that he doesn't use basmati rice, preferring arborio to make a risotto and that instead of a nice raeta on the side he just sprinkles a little parmesan.

Keep this up steve and < Madhur Jaffrey > will come to your house and slap you about the head with hot naan fresh from the tandoor.  Or maybe Mario Batali will come and beat you with pasta rags.  Better yet, both will show up to slap you about the head for bastardizing each of their respective cuisines.
Posted by: stevestory on Oct. 31 2008,08:01

Quote (Bing @ Oct. 31 2008,05:55)
Keep this up steve and < Madhur Jaffrey > will come to your house and slap you about the head with hot naan fresh from the tandoor.  Or maybe Mario Batali will come and beat you with pasta rags.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Okay, well, if Mario Batali is discovered dead one day, having been drunk under the table and buried in a thin greasy pile of papadum, you'll know what happened.

:D
Posted by: Bing on Oct. 31 2008,13:25

Quote (stevestory @ Oct. 31 2008,08:01)
 
Quote (Bing @ Oct. 31 2008,05:55)
Keep this up steve and < Madhur Jaffrey > will come to your house and slap you about the head with hot naan fresh from the tandoor.  Or maybe Mario Batali will come and beat you with pasta rags.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------

Okay, well, if Mario Batali is discovered dead one day, having been drunk under the table and buried in a thin greasy pile of papadum, you'll know what happened. :D
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Mario, dead drunk under your table?  If what Anthony Bourdain (himself no slouch in the "legendary appetites" department) has written about Mario is even halfway true then he has nothing to fear from you.  

---------------------QUOTE-------------------
Oh, Mario! Oh great one! They shut down Molto Mario--only the smartest and best of the stand-up cooking shows. Is there any more egregiously under-used, criminally mishandled, dismissively treated chef on television? Relegated to the circus of Iron Chef America, where--like a great, toothless lion, fouling his cage, he hangs on--and on--a major draw (and often the only reason to watch the show). How I would like to see him unchained, free to make the television shows he’s capable of, the Real Mario--in all his Rabelasian brilliance. How I would love to hear the snapping bones of his cruel FN ringmasters, crunching between his mighty jaws! Let us see the cloven hooves beneath those cheery clogs! Let Mario be Mario!
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


But you keep making those Italian curries.  Unfortunately they are to cooking what afdave is to science education   :)
Posted by: stevestory on Oct. 31 2008,15:05

Quote (Bing @ Oct. 31 2008,14:25)
But you keep making those Italian curries.  Unfortunately they are to cooking what afdave is to science education   :)
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Ouch! The knife has been twisted!

:p
Posted by: Alan Fox on Oct. 31 2008,16:16

Just road-tested the chicken curry recipe with ghee, fresh garlic and chili, spice mix and yoghourt. Quite nice really*.

*fuckin' awesome in colonial speak.
Posted by: carlsonjok on Oct. 31 2008,16:36

Quote (Alan Fox @ Oct. 30 2008,10:41)
Quote (carlsonjok @ Oct. 30 2008,05:20)
Quote (Alan Fox @ Oct. 30 2008,10:16)
OK we're going with the smoked ribs and she-devil mopping sauce.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Sweet. Pork ribs, I am assuming?  Did you locate a smoker?
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Pork, indeed.

We have a hooded gas-fired barbecue and we can add some wood chips. I will experiment with a small sample, I think.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


If you have a choice of wood, I recommend apple.  Hickory is traditional, but I prefer the subletly of apple.
Posted by: Erasmus, FCD on Oct. 31 2008,16:49

i prefer longleaf pine.











not really.
Posted by: Tony M Nyphot on Nov. 01 2008,00:23

Quote (Erasmus @ FCD,Oct. 31 2008,15:49)
i prefer longleaf pine.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Louis said you preferred Notty Pine...
Posted by: Tracy P. Hamilton on Nov. 01 2008,08:18

Quote (Bing @ Oct. 31 2008,13:25)
Quote (stevestory @ Oct. 31 2008,08:01)
   
Quote (Bing @ Oct. 31 2008,05:55)
Keep this up steve and < Madhur Jaffrey > will come to your house and slap you about the head with hot naan fresh from the tandoor.  Or maybe Mario Batali will come and beat you with pasta rags.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------

Okay, well, if Mario Batali is discovered dead one day, having been drunk under the table and buried in a thin greasy pile of papadum, you'll know what happened. :D
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Mario, dead drunk under your table?  If what Anthony Bourdain (himself no slouch in the "legendary appetites" department) has written about Mario is even halfway true then he has nothing to fear from you.    

---------------------QUOTE-------------------
Oh, Mario! Oh great one! They shut down Molto Mario--only the smartest and best of the stand-up cooking shows. Is there any more egregiously under-used, criminally mishandled, dismissively treated chef on television? Relegated to the circus of Iron Chef America, where--like a great, toothless lion, fouling his cage, he hangs on--and on--a major draw (and often the only reason to watch the show). How I would like to see him unchained, free to make the television shows he’s capable of, the Real Mario--in all his Rabelasian brilliance. How I would love to hear the snapping bones of his cruel FN ringmasters, crunching between his mighty jaws! Let us see the cloven hooves beneath those cheery clogs! Let Mario be Mario!
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


But you keep making those Italian curries.  Unfortunately they are to cooking what afdave is to science education   :)
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


So, Italian curries are a blend of French and Spanish cuisines?  :p

Edit to correct for fat finger typo.
Posted by: Bing on Nov. 01 2008,13:32

Quote (stevestory @ Oct. 31 2008,15:05)
Ouch! The knife has been twisted!
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


And this is the knife!


Posted by: Crabby Appleton on Nov. 02 2008,18:28

Quote (Arden Chatfield @ Oct. 29 2008,11:37)
Quote (carlsonjok @ Oct. 29 2008,09:21)
You know, I am sitting here and cannot really think of any peculiarly American food.  Most of our cuisine is derived from some other ethnicity.  Even scrapple.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


I would recommend lots of corn dishes, but technically that's Mexico, as are tomatoes and chocolate.

So if you're insisting on some strict notion of North American, pre-Columbian purity, then go with buffalo burgers and wild rice, like they serve at powwows. Maybe some acorn mush just for variety.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Sufferin' succotash, corn was and is grown by Amerinds all over NA (and Mexico is part of NA). Corn, beans and squash were staples along with the wild rice some northern tribes harvested. Sunflower seeds and peppers were also cultivated.

With that, I'm off to pop some pop corn! :D

Crabby
Posted by: khan on Nov. 02 2008,18:39

Last Friday I acquired a custom cut turkey from a local farmer.

I like turkey, but don't want to deal with ~16 # all at once.

A ~17# turkey was cut into quarters.

Roasted a quarter yesterday.
Posted by: Crabby Appleton on Nov. 02 2008,18:54

Quote (khan @ Oct. 30 2008,18:42)
All that aside, how is ghee for deep frying?
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Quite good.
Posted by: Crabby Appleton on Nov. 02 2008,18:58

Quote (carlsonjok @ Oct. 31 2008,16:36)
If you have a choice of wood, I recommend apple.  Hickory is traditional, but I prefer the subletly of apple.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Maple is great with pork ribs too but I prefer pecan wood when I can get it.

Crabby
Posted by: Erasmus, FCD on Nov. 02 2008,22:45

Quote (Tony M Nyphot @ Nov. 01 2008,00:23)
Quote (Erasmus @ FCD,Oct. 31 2008,15:49)
i prefer longleaf pine.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Louis said you preferred Notty Pine...
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Louis is a Pinus sondereggeri.
Posted by: Alan Fox on Nov. 03 2008,04:59

We had:

Pumpkin soup, sourdough bread, crabcakes, ribs, meatloaf, boston baked beans, coleslaw, fried sprouts? (tasted OK), corn biscuits, cheesecake, apple pie.

Apple wood seemed to work OK, Carlson.

Success? Yes! Do it again? Not for a while! Nobody managed to buy any US wine, by the way; not a bottle to be found on any supermarket shelf.
Posted by: J-Dog on Nov. 03 2008,06:56

What is everyone's Libation / Libation & Food Creation Of Choice to properly celebrate Tuesday Night?
Posted by: EyeNoU on Nov. 03 2008,07:53

Quote (J-Dog @ Nov. 03 2008,06:56)
What is everyone's Libation / Libation & Food Creation Of Choice to properly celebrate Tuesday Night?
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


If McCain pulls off some sort of miracle, it will probably be shots of some overproof rum I brought back from Jamaica. Make that flaming shots of overproof rum ( I'll ignite them AFTER I drink them).
Posted by: Tracy P. Hamilton on Nov. 03 2008,10:00

Quote (J-Dog @ Nov. 03 2008,06:56)
What is everyone's Libation / Libation & Food Creation Of Choice to properly celebrate Tuesday Night?
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


I will be having a bit of Participation Lager from Magic Hat, on Wednesday for sure.  Maybe a California BBQ Pizza clone Tuesday night, with Sonny's sweet BBQ sauce, since CA is going to sink McSame's campaign.  http://www.recipezaar.com/155744   Yum!
Posted by: Albatrossity2 on Nov. 03 2008,10:27

Quote (J-Dog @ Nov. 03 2008,06:56)
What is everyone's Libation / Libation & Food Creation Of Choice to properly celebrate Tuesday Night?
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


This, from the great state of Delaware.


Posted by: drew91 on Nov. 03 2008,10:46

Quote (Albatrossity2 @ Nov. 03 2008,10:27)
Quote (J-Dog @ Nov. 03 2008,06:56)
What is everyone's Libation / Libation & Food Creation Of Choice to properly celebrate Tuesday Night?
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


This, from the great state of Delaware.


---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Excellent choice.  That's my current favorite for commercial IPA.
Posted by: JohnW on Nov. 03 2008,14:10

Quote (J-Dog @ Nov. 03 2008,04:56)
What is everyone's Libation / Libation & Food Creation Of Choice to properly celebrate Tuesday Night?
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Baked Alaska.
Posted by: Spottedwind on Nov. 03 2008,14:15

Quote (JohnW @ Nov. 03 2008,15:10)
 
Quote (J-Dog @ Nov. 03 2008,04:56)
What is everyone's Libation / Libation & Food Creation Of Choice to properly celebrate Tuesday Night?
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Baked Alaska.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


LOL!

1 Internet...that's how many you win.
Posted by: KCdgw on Nov. 04 2008,12:03

Quote (J-Dog @ Nov. 03 2008,06:56)
What is everyone's Libation / Libation & Food Creation Of Choice to properly celebrate Tuesday Night?
---------------------QUOTE-------------------




---------------------QUOTE-------------------
What is everyone's Libation / Libation & Food Creation Of Choice to properly celebrate Tuesday Night
---------------------QUOTE-------------------



Karl Marx was known to enjoy a few beers, so I'll be pallin' around with a few pints myself.
Posted by: Louis on Nov. 04 2008,13:35

Quote (J-Dog @ Nov. 03 2008,12:56)
What is everyone's Libation / Libation & Food Creation Of Choice to properly celebrate Tuesday Night?
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


I will be smoking a fat one in honour of an Obama victory. If McCain wins, I will be smoking several large bongs in abject self pity.

Well, perhaps not, but a boy can dream!

Louis
Posted by: ppb on Nov. 04 2008,13:57

Quote (J-Dog @ Nov. 03 2008,07:56)
What is everyone's Libation / Libation & Food Creation Of Choice to properly celebrate Tuesday Night?
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


We have a bottle of champagne ready to celebrate the dawning of the age of Obama.  I suspect we will be opening it early tonight.  Looking forward to the John Stewart/Stephen Colbert election night coverage too.   :)
Posted by: Reed on Nov. 05 2008,00:21

Quote (J-Dog @ Nov. 03 2008,04:56)
What is everyone's Libation / Libation & Food Creation Of Choice to properly celebrate Tuesday Night?
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Win or lose, the importance of properly marking your ballot cannot be overemphasized.
< >
Posted by: Tracy P. Hamilton on Nov. 05 2008,13:00

Quote (Albatrossity2 @ Nov. 03 2008,10:27)
Quote (J-Dog @ Nov. 03 2008,06:56)
What is everyone's Libation / Libation & Food Creation Of Choice to properly celebrate Tuesday Night?
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


This, from the great state of Delaware.


---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Had one.  Thanks for the suggestion Albatrossity, if that is your real name.   ;)
Posted by: stevestory on Nov. 14 2008,23:29

Quote (Albatrossity2 @ Nov. 03 2008,11:27)
Quote (J-Dog @ Nov. 03 2008,06:56)
What is everyone's Libation / Libation & Food Creation Of Choice to properly celebrate Tuesday Night?
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


This, from the great state of Delaware.


---------------------QUOTE-------------------


The thing I miss most about Chapel Hill / Carrboro anymore, is the parties where the hipsters bought kegs of that stuff.
Posted by: stevestory on Nov. 14 2008,23:35

Anyone have any good hors d'oeurve or amuse-bouches? I've got an occasion coming up next weekend and having some clever finger food would be helpful.
Posted by: Erasmus, FCD on Nov. 14 2008,23:43

can't go wrong with this


and some dry munchies


dessert


Posted by: stevestory on Nov. 15 2008,00:30

Without getting into the story of how I have to keep a foodie occupied for 3-4 days in BFE Florida, let's just say I've thought about taking her to a tapas bar in Gainesville, which is only 30 mins away, but it would be nice to have some clever recipes to use here.
Posted by: Bing on Nov. 15 2008,13:02

Quote (stevestory @ Nov. 15 2008,00:30)
Without getting into the story of how I have to keep a foodie occupied for 3-4 days in BFE Florida, let's just say I've thought about taking her to a tapas bar in Gainesville, which is only 30 mins away, but it would be nice to have some clever recipes to use here.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


what, you're not making your special Spaghetti Vindaloo?

I made this autumn soup last night.  Everyone had 2 bowls, some went back for a third.  Made it kind of hard to eat the steaks as the main.

Apple and butternut squash soup

Serves 4 to 6

2 tablespoons (25 mL) butter

1 cup (250 mL) chopped onion

3 cups (750 mL) cubed peeled butternut squash

2 cups (500 mL) diced, peeled apple

4 cups (1 L) canned chicken broth

1 cup (250 mL) apple juice

3/4 teaspoon (3 mL) salt

1/2 teaspoon (2 mL) ground coriander

1/2 teaspoon (2 mL) ground ginger

1/2 teaspoon (2 mL) nutmeg

1/2 teaspoon (2 mL) freshly ground pepper

Chopped fresh parsley, paprika as garnish

Melt butter in a heavy bottom pot (dutch oven) over medium heat. Add onion and saute until softened, about five minutes. Add squash and apple; saute for two minutes. Stir in next seven ingredients (broth through pepper). Bring to a boil. Reduce heat. Simmer, uncovered, stirring occasionally, until squash and apple are tender, about 25 to 30 minutes.

Puree soup in batches in a blender, filling blender no more than half full for each batch. Return soup to pan and heat to serving temperature.

Serve sprinkled with parsley and paprika.

If you want to crunch it up a bit you can make your own 'crackers'  Take a baguette, slice it on a shallow diagonal about 1/2" thick, brush with olive oil and slide it in a 400 oven until they're golden brown.

Make it all ahead of time and you can reheat the soup when you need it.
Posted by: carlsonjok on Nov. 15 2008,15:34

Quote (Bing @ Nov. 15 2008,13:02)
Quote (stevestory @ Nov. 15 2008,00:30)
Without getting into the story of how I have to keep a foodie occupied for 3-4 days in BFE Florida, let's just say I've thought about taking her to a tapas bar in Gainesville, which is only 30 mins away, but it would be nice to have some clever recipes to use here.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


what, you're not making your special Spaghetti Vindaloo?

I made this autumn soup last night.  Everyone had 2 bowls, some went back for a third.  Made it kind of hard to eat the steaks as the main.

Apple and butternut squash soup
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


That is very similar to a recipe I make occasionally: < Thai Butternut Bisque >.

The bisque looks like it would be a little creamier because of the coconut milk, but other wise it looks to be just about identical.
Posted by: stevestory on Nov. 15 2008,16:02

I am absolutely going to make some of that butternut squash soup.
Posted by: Bing on Nov. 16 2008,08:13

I can't believe I missed this straight line, I must be getting old.

Quote (stevestory @ Nov. 15 2008,00:30)
Without getting into the story of how I have to keep a foodie occupied for 3-4 days in BFE Florida,
---------------------QUOTE-------------------



2 words steve, < edible condoms >
Posted by: khan on Nov. 27 2008,11:57

Time to take the duck out of the oven.  This year I followed the directions on the package instead of setting off the smoke alarm.
Posted by: Lou FCD on Nov. 27 2008,12:16

Just pulled out our bird, the taters are mashed, the peanut butter pie is done, the homemade apple pie (and crust from scratch, too!) is done, the sides are coming off the stove and out of the oven. The table is being set by the kids, and the wine is cold.

Let's eat!
Posted by: J-Dog on Nov. 27 2008,12:29

I'm just killing time waiting for relatives from OH to get here.  Wifey is just putting turkey in oven, but snacks are on the table, and wine and beer is chilling.

My daughter in Scotland is out with other US students having there own dinner, each brought a dish, and oldest son is on Dorm Duty in MO.
Posted by: Arden Chatfield on Nov. 27 2008,12:39

Quote (Lou FCD @ Nov. 27 2008,10:16)
Just pulled out our bird, the taters are mashed, the peanut butter pie is done, the homemade apple pie (and crust from scratch, too!) is done, the sides are coming off the stove and out of the oven. The table is being set by the kids, and the wine is cold.

Let's eat!
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Peanut butter pie?? How does one make that?

We've barely started here in the Pacific Time zone. Just getting ready to put the bird in the oven.

Only the 3 of us this year, so it's not as much food as last year -- turkey, taters, yams, stuffing, cheese cake. Still probably enough to immobilize us by 6pm. Gorgeous weather here, tho. 60 degrees, sunny, very clear.
Posted by: carlsonjok on Nov. 27 2008,13:36

Quote (Lou FCD @ Nov. 27 2008,12:16)
Just pulled out our bird, the taters are mashed, the peanut butter pie is done, the homemade apple pie (and crust from scratch, too!) is done, the sides are coming off the stove and out of the oven. The table is being set by the kids, and the wine is cold.

Let's eat!
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


I'm just getting started. I made a pecan pie this morning, and the bird has been in for an hour. But, I need to get cracking* on the sweet potatoes, mashed potatoes, stuffing, green bean casserole, and garden salad.

* Actually, like a good manufacturing guy, I have the whole thing scheduled out in 15 minute increments.
Posted by: stevestory on Nov. 27 2008,15:26

I'm done. The stuffing and mincemeat pie was fantastic. And the pecan pie. Not a big fan of other Thanksgiving food.

Now I'm waiting for the bar down the street to open at 6 so I can have Liquid Thanksgiving.
Posted by: Lou FCD on Nov. 27 2008,15:39

Turkey nap approaching in 3... 2...
Posted by: Arden Chatfield on Nov. 27 2008,15:45

Quote (Lou FCD @ Nov. 27 2008,13:39)
Turkey nap approaching in 3... 2...
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


HA HA THIS IS YOU:


Posted by: Louis on Nov. 27 2008,17:01

And a Merry Thankmas to one and all.....

Isn't this the day we give thanks for what we are grateful for?

In that case I'd like to thank Arden's and Carlson's mums. The pony show they did was inspiring. Carlson, you trained those horses good!

Mes enfants, je t'adore! N'oubliez pas incliner votre serveuse, je suis ici toute la semaine, essayez le veau!

Au revoir!


Louis
Posted by: Arden Chatfield on Nov. 27 2008,17:20

Quote (Lou FCD @ Nov. 27 2008,10:16)
the peanut butter pie is done,
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


So how on earth do you make peanut butter pie??
Posted by: Lou FCD on Nov. 27 2008,17:32

Quote (Arden Chatfield @ Nov. 27 2008,18:20)
Quote (Lou FCD @ Nov. 27 2008,10:16)
the peanut butter pie is done,
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


So how on earth do you make peanut butter pie??
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


mmmm.... it's not morning yet?

Ok, peanut butter pie.

1 jar peanut butter
16 oz cool whip
2 blocks philly cream cheese
some vanilla extract
some canned milk

mix

press into graham cracker or chocolate pie shell

chill

eat

feel free to add chocolate, chocolate chips, or whatever floats your boat
Posted by: stevestory on Nov. 27 2008,20:32

Anyone know anything about Valerian? I haven't been able to do my usual really hard training in about 3-4 months (long, boring story) and combined with my love of coffee, cigs, and booze, my health has really taken a hit. My nervous system's gotten a little weird and my hands slightly shaky and my heart rate's gone from a resting heart rate of 60 bpm 3 months ago to about 80 now and occasionally it shoots up to like 100. So obviously I'm looking around for mild sedatives/tranquilizers and I heard about Valerian root. The other day I was headed to work to tutor some high schoolers after school, and I stopped into the nearby drugstore and got some Valerian Root pills. I took a handful, and over the next hour it seemed like my heart rate went down maybe 5-10 bpm. I'm not sure it was working or it was psychosomatic. I got home and the NIH said studies are inconclusive, with maybe some very mild effect. Anybody know more about this root?
Posted by: Arden Chatfield on Nov. 27 2008,21:04


Posted by: Arden Chatfield on Nov. 27 2008,21:05

Quote (Lou FCD @ Nov. 27 2008,15:32)
   
Quote (Arden Chatfield @ Nov. 27 2008,18:20)
   
Quote (Lou FCD @ Nov. 27 2008,10:16)
the peanut butter pie is done,
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


So how on earth do you make peanut butter pie??
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


mmmm.... it's not morning yet?

Ok, peanut butter pie.

1 jar peanut butter
16 oz cool whip
2 blocks philly cream cheese
some vanilla extract
some canned milk

mix

press into graham cracker or chocolate pie shell

chill

eat

feel free to add chocolate, chocolate chips, or whatever floats your boat
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


That's terrifying.

I mean it sounds delicious, but that's 6 month's worth of calories and fat in 20 minutes.

Nevertheless, I want some.
Posted by: Lou FCD on Nov. 27 2008,22:05

Quote (Arden Chatfield @ Nov. 27 2008,22:05)
That's terrifying.

I mean it sounds delicious, but that's 6 month's worth of calories and fat in 20 minutes.

Nevertheless, I want some.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


It rocketh. My late mother in law taught me to make it, and yeah, it's weapons-grade rich.

The apple pie was better, though. I outdid myself with this one.
Posted by: khan on Nov. 28 2008,10:27

Is it appropriate to serve white wine (Pinot Grigio) at room temperature when said temperature is 60F?
Posted by: stevestory on Dec. 03 2008,20:17

a half-japanese girl I know got me a few random things for xmas, and this was among them:



I sauteed an onion and 3 diced chicken thighs and then mixed this in.

It wasn't bad. Nothing to write home about, but nothing special.
Posted by: Kristine on Dec. 03 2008,21:17

Hey, some of those packaged stir-fry stuffs, frozen buns, and jazzed-up ramen recipes you find in small Asian stores are pretty good. Cheaper, too.

I am drinking sherry.

Just put a stuffed turkey in the oven. No turkey for Thanksgiving - that's for Indian food and hummus and gyros. And scotch. (Rev. Barky and I go to my mom's for breakfast, and he says to all assembled, "I think I have a hangover." They laughed.) :D

For the employee holiday party :) I have entered the chili contest and am thinking of combining a modified recipe for ratatouille with curry, chick peas, lentils, kidney beans and gyros meat.  :p
Posted by: stevestory on Dec. 03 2008,21:30

Quote (Kristine @ Dec. 03 2008,22:17)
I am drinking sherry.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


I'm drinking too, and don't call me Sherry.
Posted by: khan on Dec. 03 2008,21:34

Have some Madeira, my dear.
Posted by: Kristine on Dec. 03 2008,22:01

Quote (stevestory @ Dec. 03 2008,21:30)
   
Quote (Kristine @ Dec. 03 2008,22:17)
I am drinking sherry.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


I'm drinking too, and don't call me Sherry.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Two of what? And I didn't call you. And that's < Sherry over there >.

What Would Journey Drink? :p
Posted by: Lou FCD on Dec. 20 2008,20:59

Enjoying a pinot grigio (sp?) from ... Beringer, maybe? two glasses, lovely fuzznbuzz since I hadn't had a drop of alcohol since around the beginning of the semester, and right this very moment, life is good.

Carry on.
Posted by: khan on Dec. 31 2008,21:32

Drinking mead right now.

Should New Year's dinner be shrimp or gizzards?
Posted by: rhmc on Jan. 01 2009,06:32

Quote (khan @ Dec. 31 2008,22:32)
Should New Year's dinner be shrimp or gizzards?
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


both.

gizzards in dirty rice, skrimps in a white sauce over the rice.

or skrimps'n'grits in the morning, fried gizzards for later...
Posted by: Quack on Jan. 01 2009,09:12

Somebody (investors, stockbrokers/real estate brokers …?) ran a car into one of the state owned liquor stores in Oslo the night before New Years eve and got away with the store’s supply of the best quality magnum champagne bottles – priced at up to 27000 NOK ($3500)/bottle.

Skål!

I suppose they are addicted to the stuff, gotta have it, job or no job…
Posted by: Arden Chatfield on Jan. 01 2009,14:25

Quote (rhmc @ Jan. 01 2009,04:32)
Quote (khan @ Dec. 31 2008,22:32)
Should New Year's dinner be shrimp or gizzards?
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


both.

gizzards in dirty rice, skrimps in a white sauce over the rice.

or skrimps'n'grits in the morning, fried gizzards for later...
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Gonna try my luck with < hoppin' john > today, as it's a very New Years Day thing to make. Used to make dishes like it a lot during my Starving Grad Student days in the late 80's/early 90's.
Posted by: carlsonjok on Jan. 01 2009,14:44

Quote (Arden Chatfield @ Jan. 01 2009,14:25)
Gonna try my luck with < hoppin' john > today, as it's a very New Years Day thing to make. Used to make dishes like it a lot during my Starving Grad Student days in the late 80's/early 90's.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


My Hoppin' John is going to be ready in about 5 minutes. I used a < Paul Prudhomme recipe >, although I substituted a ham steak for the smoked sausage and am cooking my rice separately rather than in with the peas and such.

Eating black-eyed peas on New Year's Day is supposed to bring good luck for the year.  At least that is the case down south.  I figured the tradition out there in California (some of these buildings are over twenty years old!) would be something like dried seaweed or home made granola.
Posted by: stevestory on Jan. 01 2009,15:01

Quote (carlsonjok @ Jan. 01 2009,15:44)
I figured the tradition out there in California (some of these buildings are over twenty years old!)
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


oooo, an esoteric reference to my favorite movie of all time. Carlson, you get extra bonus points.
Posted by: Arden Chatfield on Jan. 01 2009,15:56

Quote (stevestory @ Jan. 01 2009,13:01)
Quote (carlsonjok @ Jan. 01 2009,15:44)
I figured the tradition out there in California (some of these buildings are over twenty years old!)
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


oooo, an esoteric reference to my favorite movie of all time. Carlson, you get extra bonus points.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Can Carlson tell us how many buildings in Oklahoma predate 1907?
Posted by: carlsonjok on Jan. 01 2009,16:28

Quote (Arden Chatfield @ Jan. 01 2009,15:56)
Quote (stevestory @ Jan. 01 2009,13:01)
Quote (carlsonjok @ Jan. 01 2009,15:44)
I figured the tradition out there in California (some of these buildings are over twenty years old!)
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


oooo, an esoteric reference to my favorite movie of all time. Carlson, you get extra bonus points.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Can Carlson tell us how many buildings in Oklahoma predate 1907?
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


< Plenty >.
Posted by: Tony M Nyphot on Jan. 01 2009,19:54

Quote (carlsonjok @ Jan. 01 2009,13:44)
Eating black-eyed peas on New Year's Day is supposed to bring good luck for the year.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Christians have their Designer in the Sky and His promise of a heavenly eternity. Carlsonjok only has magic black-eyed peas and maybe – just maybe – luck for a year.

Not sure who to pity more...

I had extended family over for a New Year's Day dinner and successfully prepared one of the best homemade meals I have ever created: SauerBraten (marinated 5 days), Blaukraut, Pumpernickel (Americanized version), Potato Galette and steamed broccoli with a thyme/coriander/pepper seasoning. (None had much rat in them.)

Served with a wine choice of Riesling, Cröver Nacktarsch, Schwarzriesling, or Dornfelder –or– a beer choice of Paulaner Oktoberfest Marzen, Hofbrau HefeWeiss, Tilburg's Dutch Brown Ale or Leffe Blonde.

And for dessert, whole-milk black raspberry/chocolate chip ice cream to help calm acidic reactions sure to visit later in the night. (Too bad about evolution failing to enable the small intestine to deal with those foul polysaccharides and oligosaccharides.)

Oh yes...Ramos Pinto Vintage Port 2000 for the cook after everyone left.

ETA: magic and left-out libations.

Son of ETA: left overs and gifts


Posted by: Arden Chatfield on Jan. 01 2009,20:10

Quote (carlsonjok @ Jan. 01 2009,14:28)
Quote (Arden Chatfield @ Jan. 01 2009,15:56)
Quote (stevestory @ Jan. 01 2009,13:01)
 
Quote (carlsonjok @ Jan. 01 2009,15:44)
I figured the tradition out there in California (some of these buildings are over twenty years old!;)
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


oooo, an esoteric reference to my favorite movie of all time. Carlson, you get extra bonus points.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Can Carlson tell us how many buildings in Oklahoma predate 1907?
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


< Plenty >.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Don't worry, we all know that as America's 46th state, Oklahoma is very, very venerable. I hear they even pretty much had electricity by 1950.

Now go finish cooking your hog maws. And don't get on my case about food, Steve's the one who puts Ragu sauce in his curry.

:angry:
Posted by: khan on Jan. 01 2009,20:12

Today I made gizzard casserole.

Maybe I'll make it my New Year tradition.
Posted by: Louis on Jan. 02 2009,03:10

Quote (Tony M Nyphot @ Jan. 02 2009,01:54)
[SNIP]


---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Unicum? YIKES!

That stuff is EVIL! I drank it whilst in Hungary, and it nearly finished me off. It's like Jagermeister only more disgusting. The Hungarians drink it like water however, lovely, mad folk that they are. It is however palatable as a "Unabomber" ( a shot of Unicum dropped into a glass of red Bull which is drunk in one go, like Jager Bombs).

And no one make any jokes about the name "Unicum" they've all been done.

Mr Nyphot, if you drink that, you are a braver man than I. My headgear, it is off.

Louis
Posted by: Tony M Nyphot on Jan. 02 2009,11:14

Quote (Louis @ Jan. 02 2009,02:10)
Unicum? YIKES!

That stuff is EVIL! I drank it whilst in Hungary, and it nearly finished me off. It's like Jagermeister only more disgusting. The Hungarians drink it like water however, lovely, mad folk that they are. It is however palatable as a "Unabomber" ( a shot of Unicum dropped into a glass of red Bull which is drunk in one go, like Jager Bombs).

And no one make any jokes about the name "Unicum" they've all been done.

Mr Nyphot, if you drink that, you are a braver man than I. My headgear, it is off.

Louis
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Yes...the Unicum...well, that was one of the "gifts" brought by attendees.

That exact bottle was a present given 3 years ago from the significant other's brother (or maybe it was Arden's uncle?...I get them confused) who lives in Budapest.

Unicum's properties are well known, the bottle has not been opened and it travels the rounds, given mostly as a "gift" to the host of various dinners throughout the year. It somehow always finds its way back home. I love it so...

I was more worried about the Riesling as it came from Carlson Vineyards...it's probably just horse piss.
Posted by: Louis on Jan. 02 2009,14:14

Quote (Tony M Nyphot @ Jan. 02 2009,17:14)
[SNIP]

I was more worried about the Riesling as it came from Carlson Vineyards...it's probably just horse piss.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


You can but hope, at least it would wash out the taste of the Unicum.

Louis
Posted by: Tony M Nyphot on Jan. 02 2009,19:40

Quote (Louis @ Jan. 02 2009,13:14)
   
Quote (Tony M Nyphot @ Jan. 02 2009,17:14)
[SNIP]

I was more worried about the Riesling as it came from Carlson Vineyards...it's probably just horse piss.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


You can but hope, at least it would wash out the taste of the Unicum.

Louis
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Strangely, as long as it is ice cold, Unicum isn't so bad after a few sips. It's just that it removes the enamel from your teeth. Supposedly it's a good digestive aid and the story I'm told from Budapest is that Unicum started out as a bitters aperitif.

As such I've experimented with a few drops in martinis and soups, but it tends to eclipse every other ingredient. However, mixed with a bit of soda in the AM works as a good corpse reviver. Give it a try.

*****************

On another note, I'm curious what beers are favored most by the "scientific" crowd here, categorically, from the British Isles, from the Continent and from the States.

I like most of the Samuel Smiths but it is overpriced. While relaxing on a ferry between Denmark and Sweden, I really enjoyed a Ceres Royal Dark (Stout?), but have never found it in the States. I also like Duvel.

I don't much care for the US micro-brewery stuff I'm surrounded by. They taste a bit green to me.
Posted by: carlsonjok on Jan. 02 2009,20:05

Quote (Tony M Nyphot @ Jan. 02 2009,11:14)
I was more worried about the Riesling as it came from Carlson Vineyards...it's probably just horse piss.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Well, Colorado isn't exactly considered a prime Riesling appellation*, although their 2000 Gewürztraminer got a fair to middling score from Wine Spectator.  Did you actually try it?

* I was really impressed with a Llano Estacado Gewürztraminer**, from a winery near Lubbock, Texas.  Then I found out they imported their Gewürz grapes from Washington State.

** I didn't realize it was from Texas until I got home.
Posted by: Albatrossity2 on Jan. 02 2009,20:30

Quote (carlsonjok @ Jan. 02 2009,20:05)
 
Quote (Tony M Nyphot @ Jan. 02 2009,11:14)
I was more worried about the Riesling as it came from Carlson Vineyards...it's probably just horse piss.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Well, Colorado isn't exactly considered a prime Riesling appellation*, although their 2000 Gewürztraminer got a fair to middling score from Wine Spectator.  Did you actually try it?

* I was really impressed with a Llano Estacado Gewürztraminer**, from a winery near Lubbock, Texas.  Then I found out they imported their Gewürz grapes from Washington State.

** I didn't realize it was from Texas until I got home.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Actually, the Llano Estacado winery near Lubbock produces some very good wines. Their Chardonnay has won awards at California wine fairs, and their < Select Port > is probably the best American-made port that I have tried. I have no idea where the grapes for these wines might originate, but I'd urge you to try them if you get the chance.

Coincidentally I am currently reading < Judgment of Paris >, G.M. Taber's account of the 1976 tasting that established California wines as equal to or better than the best French wines. I suspect that the TX wines are a few decades away from that sort of surprising success, but I'm sure that they are dreamning about it!
Posted by: Arden Chatfield on Jan. 02 2009,20:34

Quote (Albatrossity2 @ Jan. 02 2009,18:30)
Coincidentally I am currently reading < Judgment of Paris >, G.M. Taber's account of the 1976 tasting that established California wines as equal to or better than the best French wines. I suspect that the TX wines are a few decades away from that sort of surprising success, but I'm sure that they are dreaming about it!
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


The first thing they gotta do is start using bottles instead of boxes.
Posted by: khan on Jan. 02 2009,20:44

Quote (Arden Chatfield @ Jan. 02 2009,21:34)
Quote (Albatrossity2 @ Jan. 02 2009,18:30)
Coincidentally I am currently reading < Judgment of Paris >, G.M. Taber's account of the 1976 tasting that established California wines as equal to or better than the best French wines. I suspect that the TX wines are a few decades away from that sort of surprising success, but I'm sure that they are dreaming about it!
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


The first thing they gotta do is start using bottles instead of boxes.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


What's wrong with boxed wine?
Posted by: Albatrossity2 on Jan. 02 2009,21:05

Quote (Arden Chatfield @ Jan. 02 2009,20:34)
 
Quote (Albatrossity2 @ Jan. 02 2009,18:30)
Coincidentally I am currently reading < Judgment of Paris >, G.M. Taber's account of the 1976 tasting that established California wines as equal to or better than the best French wines. I suspect that the TX wines are a few decades away from that sort of surprising success, but I'm sure that they are dreaming about it!
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


The first thing they gotta do is start using bottles instead of boxes.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Both of those wines I mentioned are packaged in bottles. Seriously, if Kermit Lynch or Beltramo's or some other wine store in the Bay Area carries that port from Llano Estacado, pick up a bottle from them. I think you'll be pleasantly surprised.
Posted by: Arden Chatfield on Jan. 02 2009,21:58

Quote (khan @ Jan. 02 2009,18:44)
 
Quote (Arden Chatfield @ Jan. 02 2009,21:34)
 
Quote (Albatrossity2 @ Jan. 02 2009,18:30)
Coincidentally I am currently reading < Judgment of Paris >, G.M. Taber's account of the 1976 tasting that established California wines as equal to or better than the best French wines. I suspect that the TX wines are a few decades away from that sort of surprising success, but I'm sure that they are dreaming about it!
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


The first thing they gotta do is start using bottles instead of boxes.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


What's wrong with boxed wine?
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Well, for people who put spaghetti sauce in their curry, nothing at all.
Posted by: carlsonjok on Jan. 02 2009,22:14

Quote (Albatrossity2 @ Jan. 02 2009,20:30)
 
Quote (carlsonjok @ Jan. 02 2009,20:05)
 
* I was really impressed with a Llano Estacado Gewürztraminer**, from a winery near Lubbock, Texas.  Then I found out they imported their Gewürz grapes from Washington State.

---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Actually, the Llano Estacado winery near Lubbock produces some very good wines. Their Chardonnay has won awards at California wine fairs, and their < Select Port > is probably the best American-made port that I have tried. I have no idea where the grapes for these wines might originate, but I'd urge you to try them if you get the chance.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Oh, that doesn't surprise me as I have had what I think was actually a good Shiraz from Tres Sueños winery here in Oklahoma. However, grapes like Gewürztraminer and Riesling tend to make better wines when they come from a region that has warm days and cooler nights like Washington State, the Finger Lakes region of New York, and (of course) Germany and the Alsace region of France.  Say what you want about West Texas, that isn't the type of weather they have and, thus, probably explains why they import their Gewürztraminer grapes.

I'll have to look for their port at my local package store.  I am not a big port drinker, but I have liked the Missouri ports made with Cynthiana grapes.
Posted by: Tony M Nyphot on Jan. 02 2009,22:32

Quote (carlsonjok @ Jan. 02 2009,19:05)
Well, Colorado isn't exactly considered a prime Riesling appellation
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Au contraire, nuisance du cheval:


Posted by: Tony M Nyphot on Jan. 02 2009,22:56

Quote (Albatrossity2 @ Jan. 02 2009,19:30)
their < Select Port > is probably the best American-made port that I have tried.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Much like AtBC and the tard, Port happens to be an obsession.

I'll search this out and give it a taste based entirely on the recommendation from one of my favorite < MPFC sketch subjects >, though I doubt you come with any bloody wafers.

Watch for Louis and Arden making an appearance towards the end.
Posted by: carlsonjok on Jan. 02 2009,23:03

Quote (Tony M Nyphot @ Jan. 02 2009,22:32)
Quote (carlsonjok @ Jan. 02 2009,19:05)
Well, Colorado isn't exactly considered a prime Riesling appellation
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Au contraire, nuisance du cheval:


---------------------QUOTE-------------------


That is cool.  I'll have to look around for it.  

I noticed the other winners include Chateau Ste Michelle, which is one of my favorite wineries, and Heron Hill, which is on my list to visit the next time I am up in the Finger Lakes.
Posted by: khan on Jan. 02 2009,23:13

Quote (Tony M Nyphot @ Jan. 02 2009,23:56)
Quote (Albatrossity2 @ Jan. 02 2009,19:30)
their < Select Port > is probably the best American-made port that I have tried.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Much like AtBC and the tard, Port happens to be an obsession.

I'll search this out and give it a taste based entirely on the recommendation from one of my favorite < MPFC sketch subjects >, though I doubt you come with any bloody wafers.

Watch for Louis and Arden making an appearance towards the end.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Port
Madeira
Marsala

experimenting...
Posted by: Tony M Nyphot on Jan. 02 2009,23:30

Quote (carlsonjok @ Jan. 02 2009,22:03)
I noticed the other winners include Chateau Ste Michelle, which is one of my favorite wineries, and Heron Hill, which is on my list to visit the next time I am up in the Finger Lakes.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


If you like Finger Lakes regional wines...

Not sure I can recall any specific label names (or that you could find them in the US anyway) but a fantastic wine experience for me was during a break from a skiing trip in British Columbia. We spent 2 days touring the wineries surrounding Kelowna and Okanagan Lake and partaking in their Ice Wine Festival. One of the best tasting Rieslings I've enjoyed was during that trip, The only other thing I can remember in relation to that Reisling is that the next stop was a nearby goat cheese tasting room.

We are planning on going back for a summer or early fall visit just to do some tasting room hopping.
Posted by: khan on Jan. 02 2009,23:36

Does anyone know of a good source for may wine?

I recall having some many years ago.
Posted by: Dr.GH on Jan. 03 2009,00:43

I am having a very nice Sherry- there are a bunch of numbers and letters on the label that assure me that this is a very old Spanish solara.

What ever. It tastes very good, and IT IS CHEAP! $4US/750 ml at 17% alcohol.

There are some sherrys I have enjoyed that were very expensive. They were bought by other people.

If you see "Real Tesoro," give it a try.


Posted by: Dr.GH on Jan. 03 2009,00:45

Quote (stevestory @ Jan. 01 2009,13:01)
Quote (carlsonjok @ Jan. 01 2009,15:44)
I figured the tradition out there in California (some of these buildings are over twenty years old!)
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


oooo, an esoteric reference to my favorite movie of all time. Carlson, you get extra bonus points.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


You like Woody Allen movies?

Here is a fun true story;

I started an environmental consulting firm mostly to break the back of an outfit that had messed with me. Our first job was to monitor and recover cultural material (archaeological stuff) during a grading project in a public park. This should have been easy. Just 3 miles X ~12 feet wide (one machine width), supposedly over previously graded material.

On the walk over, I identified 6 locations that were potential problems. One was an 18th century adobe structure from California's colonial period.

When we got to ~mile 2 of the project, about 200 yards from the adobe building, we had found 4 prehistoric villages. But the bonus was the unexploded bombs I found.

The adobe was a used as a bombing target for navy/marine pilot trainers in the WWII and Korean wars.

Plus, the County engineer bastards never paid my invoices.

(Oh, I did break the assholes that had messed with me, and made a few dollars in profit).


Posted by: Arden Chatfield on Jan. 05 2009,21:15

Chili from scratch tonight (i.e., no chili block, no mix):

1 1/2 lbs dried pinto beans, soaked for about 6-7 hours
1 1/4 lbs organic range-fed hamburger
1 medium yellow onion, shredded
crushed garlic (lots)

Start boiling the dried pintos. They smell great while boiling, so don't put anything in them right away.

Fry hamburger (in olive oil) in one pan til brown; sautee onion and garlic in another pan. When both are done, add the onion/garlic to the hamburger. Then add the spices to that, in the pan: 2-3 tablespoons Grandma's chili power, coriander, lots of cumin, some white chili powder (very hot), and some Indian green chili paste (very very hot). Sautee this all together, then dump into the pot of boiling beans.

You will note: no tomatoes. They give me acid reflux, so I purposely left them out.  Usually I make chili with canned beans and a chili block, so this is kind of an experiment for me, tho it's not too different from how I used to make chili 20 years ago in college.

Last I checked, the 'broth' was good (quite spice-hot), but the pintos weren't soft yet. We'll see how it turns out.

Corn bread on the side.
Posted by: stevestory on Jan. 05 2009,23:27

long been a fan of lobster bisque but never made it. tomorrow night i plan on making it according to < this basic recipe. >

Probably add some onion though.
Posted by: Assassinator on Jan. 06 2009,06:40

Quote (Arden Chatfield @ Jan. 05 2009,21:15)
Chili from scratch tonight (i.e., no chili block, no mix):

1 1/2 lbs dried pinto beans, soaked for about 6-7 hours
1 1/4 lbs organic range-fed hamburger
1 medium yellow onion, shredded
crushed garlic (lots)

Start boiling the dried pintos. They smell great while boiling, so don't put anything in them right away.

Fry hamburger (in olive oil) in one pan til brown; sautee onion and garlic in another pan. When both are done, add the onion/garlic to the hamburger. Then add the spices to that, in the pan: 2-3 tablespoons Grandma's chili power, coriander, lots of cumin, some white chili powder (very hot), and some Indian green chili paste (very very hot). Sautee this all together, then dump into the pot of boiling beans.

You will note: no tomatoes. They give me acid reflux, so I purposely left them out.  Usually I make chili with canned beans and a chili block, so this is kind of an experiment for me, tho it's not too different from how I used to make chili 20 years ago in college.

Last I checked, the 'broth' was good (quite spice-hot), but the pintos weren't soft yet. We'll see how it turns out.

Corn bread on the side.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Why hamburgers and no ground meat? That's what we usually use, seems easier to process for the end product. We never make chili like that though, e.a never truly from scratch. Looks really good, we barely make anything from scratch from home, we should do it more often. It just takes so much time :(
Posted by: Arden Chatfield on Jan. 06 2009,09:04

Quote (Assassinator @ Jan. 06 2009,04:40)
Quote (Arden Chatfield @ Jan. 05 2009,21:15)
Chili from scratch tonight (i.e., no chili block, no mix):

1 1/2 lbs dried pinto beans, soaked for about 6-7 hours
1 1/4 lbs organic range-fed hamburger
1 medium yellow onion, shredded
crushed garlic (lots)

Start boiling the dried pintos. They smell great while boiling, so don't put anything in them right away.

Fry hamburger (in olive oil) in one pan til brown; sautee onion and garlic in another pan. When both are done, add the onion/garlic to the hamburger. Then add the spices to that, in the pan: 2-3 tablespoons Grandma's chili power, coriander, lots of cumin, some white chili powder (very hot), and some Indian green chili paste (very very hot). Sautee this all together, then dump into the pot of boiling beans.

You will note: no tomatoes. They give me acid reflux, so I purposely left them out.  Usually I make chili with canned beans and a chili block, so this is kind of an experiment for me, tho it's not too different from how I used to make chili 20 years ago in college.

Last I checked, the 'broth' was good (quite spice-hot), but the pintos weren't soft yet. We'll see how it turns out.

Corn bread on the side.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Why hamburgers and no ground meat? That's what we usually use, seems easier to process for the end product. We never make chili like that though, e.a never truly from scratch. Looks really good, we barely make anything from scratch from home, we should do it more often. It just takes so much time :(
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


By 'hamburger' I meant ground beef.

It came out good (the girls liked it), tho I should have soaked the beans overnight.
Posted by: Kristine on Jan. 06 2009,10:02

Heh. For the employee holiday party chili cook-off I made Texas chili - no beans, no tomatoes.
Measurements are approximate. Improvisation is the essence of chili – change the recipe as you see fit.

About 1-2 lbs. of beef, preferably a chuck or round (don't use a fancy cut!;)
1/2 lb. of the best double-smoked bacon you can find
1/2 lb. of ground pork
2 large onions, chopped
1 Tb. ground cumin (or more to taste)
As many real chilies as you can stand – I used Serrano and red jalapeño, with the seeds removed
(They will mellow with cooking and resting in the fridge)
1-2 Tb. paprika
2-4 cloves garlic
Water
Salt and pepper to taste

Cube the beef into bite-sized chunks. Dice the bacon. Heat a large heavy pan; fry the bacon until almost crisp. Scoop it out and set aside. Then fry the meat in the bacon fat until browned on all sides -- in batches, if necessary. Scoop out the meat and add to the bacon. Sauté the onions, garlic, and chilies in the bacon. (Those who really get concerned can drain off some of the fat, but it won't be true Texan at that point.) When everything is soft and the onion is translucent, throw in the cumin and paprika and cook briefly.

Return the meat, cover with water and bring it to a boil. Taste and add salt, then cover and set it to simmer for a couple of hours. Thicken as needed with cornmeal or stale tortillas. Serve with sour cream or cottage cheese, diced onions and, of course, beer. Like all good chilis, this is best made at least one day in advance and reheated.

Ooh. I didn't win, though.  :(
Posted by: Tony M Nyphot on Jan. 06 2009,11:49

Quote (Arden Chatfield @ Jan. 06 2009,08:04)
...tho I should have soaked the beans overnight.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Soaking overnight, and rinsing in fresh water a couple of times during their soak, helps reduce global warming activity...you could make DaveScot much happier.

If you happen to have a pressure cooker, there is absolutely no better way to cook beans. They cook clean through and are not falling apart and mushy on the exterior.

I make a vegetarian chili with black, pinto and Anasazi Ancestral Puebloan beans and serrano, chipotle, jalapeño and ancho chilies. Other ingredients are usually lots of garlic, onion, olive oil, green & red bell peppers, corn, cocoa powder, cumin, ground pepper, cilantro, oregano and basil. It only takes 15 minutes in the pressure cooker after soaking the beans overnight.
Posted by: Arden Chatfield on Jan. 06 2009,12:24

Quote (Tony M Nyphot @ Jan. 06 2009,09:49)
 
Quote (Arden Chatfield @ Jan. 06 2009,08:04)
...tho I should have soaked the beans overnight.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Soaking overnight, and rinsing in fresh water a couple of times during their soak, helps reduce global warming activity...you could make DaveScot much happier.

If you happen to have a pressure cooker, there is absolutely no better way to cook beans. They cook clean through and are not falling apart and mushy on the exterior.

I make a vegetarian chili with black, pinto and Anasazi Ancestral Puebloan beans and serrano, chipotle, jalapeño and ancho chilies. Other ingredients are usually lots of garlic, onion, olive oil, green & red bell peppers, corn, cocoa powder, cumin, ground pepper, cilantro, oregano and basil. It only takes 15 minutes in the pressure cooker after soaking the beans overnight.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


I usually soak them overnight, so they end up soaking ~18 hours, but I didn't remember to start soaking them til yesterday at 9am, so they'd only soaked around 7 hours max. Not quite ideal for cheapo dried pintos, nowhere near enough for dried black beans.

Anasazi beans are great! Great flavor and you don't even have to soak them. But they're often very hard to find, at least around here.

Kristine's recipe looks very alluring, but I've never cooked beanless chili. I've always been vaguely intimidated by cooking it and getting it right. But beanless chili isn't an obsession out here like it is in Texas.
Posted by: Tony M Nyphot on Jan. 06 2009,17:30

Quote (Arden Chatfield @ Jan. 06 2009,11:24)
Kristine 's recipe  looks very alluring, but  I've never cooked beanless chili.  I've always been vaguely intimidated by  cooking it and getting it right. But beanless chili isn't an obsession out  her e like it is  in Texas.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


FTFY
Posted by: Arden Chatfield on Jan. 06 2009,19:47

Quote (Tony M Nyphot @ Jan. 06 2009,15:30)
   
Quote (Arden Chatfield @ Jan. 06 2009,11:24)
Kristine 's recipe  looks very alluring, but  I've never cooked beanless chili.  I've always been vaguely intimidated by  cooking it and getting it right. But beanless chili isn't an obsession out  her e like it is  in Texas.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


FTFY
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


I can improve on that:

   

---------------------QUOTE-------------------
Kristine 's recipe looks very alluring, but I've never cooked beanless chili. I've always been vaguely intimidated by cooking it and getting it right. But beanless chili isn't an obsession out here like it is  in Texas.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Posted by: khan on Jan. 06 2009,20:00

I cooked up some corned beef and used part of it to make a variation of minestrone.

Whole grain spiral pasta, a can of black beans, a bag of frozen "Italian Style Vegetables".

Quite tasty.  About 6 meals worth.
Posted by: rhmc on Jan. 06 2009,20:06

we cook corned beef by boiling it with a bag of zatarain's crab boil.  
cool it, slice it thin.  
rye bread, swiss cheese, sauerkraut.

mmmmm.  rueben's for days.  :)

stock up at st. paddy's day.  they freeze well.
Posted by: carlsonjok on Jan. 09 2009,17:34

I am currently making < Ale-sauced pork ribs and vegetables >. Although, I added parsnips in addition to  carrots, and about twice as many new redskin potatoes as is called for. Also, instead of a stout, I made it with Koningshoeven Tripel Trappist Ale.  It is probably going to be another hour or so before it is ready and I am having a hard time waiting.


Posted by: stevestory on Jan. 09 2009,17:41

anybody have an recommendations on food processors? I've heard you either pay $30 and get a piece of crap or $200 and get something good. Any comments?
Posted by: carlsonjok on Jan. 09 2009,17:52

Quote (stevestory @ Jan. 09 2009,17:41)
anybody have an recommendations on food processors? I've heard you either pay $30 and get a piece of crap or $200 and get something good. Any comments?
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


If you are still chewing tabacky, I'd suggest just getting your food preprocessed.


Posted by: stevestory on Jan. 09 2009,18:06

Carlson, does DEEZ mean anything to you?
Posted by: carlsonjok on Jan. 09 2009,18:13

Quote (stevestory @ Jan. 09 2009,18:06)
Carlson, does DEEZ mean anything to you?
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Only in reference to the fruit of trees from the order Fagales.


Posted by: stevestory on Jan. 09 2009,18:17

Dang. You preempted my kitteh.
Posted by: Tony M Nyphot on Jan. 09 2009,19:07

Quote (stevestory @ Jan. 09 2009,16:41)
anybody have an recommendations on food processors? I've heard you either pay $30 and get a piece of crap or $200 and get something good. Any comments?
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


I can give you some recommendation‘s...

I can also provide info on food processor‘s.

Seriously though, it depends somewhat on what your purpose for using one is. That will guide a prescribed evolution to a final decision.

I have four in various sizes and formats for specialized purposes and 2 are manually operated. I love them so...
Posted by: Tony M Nyphot on Jan. 09 2009,19:21

Quote (carlsonjok @ Jan. 09 2009,16:34)
I am currently making < Ale-sauced pork ribs and vegetables >. Although, I added parsnips in addition to  carrots, and about twice as many new redskin potatoes as is called for. Also, instead of a stout, I made it with Koningshoeven Tripel Trappist Ale.  It is probably going to be another hour or so before it is ready and I am having a hard time waiting.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Looks and sounds yummy. It‘s now on my list to make right after Kristine‘s chili.

I‘ll be curious to know how it turns out...post a pic.
Posted by: carlsonjok on Jan. 09 2009,20:19

Quote (Tony M Nyphot @ Jan. 09 2009,19:21)
Quote (carlsonjok @ Jan. 09 2009,16:34)
I am currently making < Ale-sauced pork ribs and vegetables >. Although, I added parsnips in addition to  carrots, and about twice as many new redskin potatoes as is called for. Also, instead of a stout, I made it with Koningshoeven Tripel Trappist Ale.  It is probably going to be another hour or so before it is ready and I am having a hard time waiting.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Looks and sounds yummy. It‘s now on my list to make right after Kristine‘s chili.

I‘ll be curious to know how it turns out...post a pic.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Alas, I do not have a digital camera, so even if I was to take a picture it would be several week before it was available.  

That said, it came out well, although it really does require more salt than is called for in the recipe.
Posted by: rhmc on Jan. 14 2009,16:03

cold snap coming.  weather the likes of not seen here in a decade.  temps in the mid 20's for a couple of nights and below freezing for a couple afterwards.

the pepper plants i have are gonna be crispy and brown when this is over so i harvested the last of the sweet peppers and a about a quart of red tabasco peppers.

i gently boiled the tabascos in a couple cups of white vinegar and then ran them through a blender til the peppers were all broken up.  
brought that concoction to a gentle boil yet again.
strained it through a fine mesh and now i have a quart jar of bright red tabasco sauce that will remove paint.  :)

i'll have to thin that out some for daily use but it won't last long around here....

now i've gotta go berm the bananas and other tender stuff.

i want me some global warming and i want it now.
Posted by: stevestory on Jan. 17 2009,21:18

I switched to Classico and Bertollis for marinara sauce. Now when I try the cheap stuff like Ragu it is sickeningly sweet. Anyway I thought I'd share a very easy-to-make thin crust pizza recipe. I never would have believed a tortilla could make a pizza crust, until I tried it.

Take a tortilla, brush/rub it with olive oil. Cook in oven for 1-2 minutes until it starts to firm. Remove, add marinara sauce, mozzarella, and whatever toppings (sliced bacon pieces, black olives, etc. Return to oven for 6-9 mins. Done!

I was really surprised by how simple and cheap the tortilla made the process. And very low carb, too.
Posted by: Lowell on Jan. 17 2009,21:40

I made raviolli for the first time ever tonight.

None of them fell apart during cooking!!!!

Purchased flat sheets of fresh pasta (too lazy to make it myself). Then cut sheets into approx 5X5 inch squares (too big in hindsight).

Filled pasta squares with mixture of sauted wild mushrooms, onions, and garlic (plus salt & pepper, of course) sauteed in olive oil, then cooled a bit, then food processed for 30 seconds or so.

Primed the edges of pasta squares with egg wash. (This must be what kept them together, to my surprise.)

Put heaping teaspoon of food-processed mushroom filling in center of each pasta square.

Pressed out air around filling, and crimped edges (both sides) with fork.

Boiled in softly-rolling water approx 4-5 minutes.

Served with a simple tomato sauce (onion, garlic, canned crushed tomatoes, salt, pepper, basil).

Pretty good, but I have a lot to learn about making raviolli. Mine had way too much excess pasta around the edges.
Posted by: carlsonjok on Jan. 18 2009,16:07

Tonight:< Cincinnati chili >.  We prefer it four way.

And to wash it down:Leinenkugel Red Lager
Posted by: khan on Jan. 18 2009,16:10

Quote (carlsonjok @ Jan. 18 2009,17:07)
Tonight:< Cincinnati chili >.  We prefer it four way.

And to wash it down:Leinenkugel Red Lager
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


What is the radius of consumption?

IIRC they tried to expand geographically, but it didn't work.
Posted by: midwifetoad on Jan. 18 2009,16:15



---------------------QUOTE-------------------
I switched to Classico and Bertollis for marinara sauce. Now when I try the cheap stuff like Ragu it is sickeningly sweet.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------



First thing to do when purchasing sauce is throw out anything that has added sugar. Most do.
Posted by: khan on Jan. 18 2009,16:21

Quote (midwifetoad @ Jan. 18 2009,17:15)


---------------------QUOTE-------------------
I switched to Classico and Bertollis for marinara sauce. Now when I try the cheap stuff like Ragu it is sickeningly sweet.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------



First thing to do when purchasing sauce is throw out anything that has added sugar. Most do.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


In the midwest, almost everything has added sugar.  I have given up on bread/rolls/bagels, it's all sweetened.
Posted by: carlsonjok on Jan. 18 2009,16:21

Quote (khan @ Jan. 18 2009,16:10)
Quote (carlsonjok @ Jan. 18 2009,17:07)
Tonight:< Cincinnati chili >.  We prefer it four way.

And to wash it down:Leinenkugel Red Lager
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


What is the radius of consumption?

IIRC they tried to expand geographically, but it didn't work.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Beats me.  I used to eat there on occasion when I lived in Columbus. Now that I live in Oklahoma, I make my own.

EDIT: I used to eat at < Skyline Chili >, and they appear to only be in Ohio, Kentucky, Indiana, and Florida.
Posted by: stevestory on Jan. 18 2009,16:22

Quote (Tony M Nyphot @ Jan. 09 2009,20:07)
Quote (stevestory @ Jan. 09 2009,16:41)
anybody have an recommendations on food processors? I've heard you either pay $30 and get a piece of crap or $200 and get something good. Any comments?
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


I can give you some recommendation‘s...

I can also provide info on food processor‘s.

Seriously though, it depends somewhat on what your purpose for using one is. That will guide a prescribed evolution to a final decision.

I have four in various sizes and formats for specialized purposes and 2 are manually operated. I love them so...
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


The thing I'd mostly use it for is chopping up onions, a frequent task I hate to do by hand.
Posted by: khan on Jan. 18 2009,16:41

Quote (stevestory @ Jan. 18 2009,17:22)
Quote (Tony M Nyphot @ Jan. 09 2009,20:07)
Quote (stevestory @ Jan. 09 2009,16:41)
anybody have an recommendations on food processors? I've heard you either pay $30 and get a piece of crap or $200 and get something good. Any comments?
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


I can give you some recommendation‘s...

I can also provide info on food processor‘s.

Seriously though, it depends somewhat on what your purpose for using one is. That will guide a prescribed evolution to a final decision.

I have four in various sizes and formats for specialized purposes and 2 are manually operated. I love them so...
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


The thing I'd mostly use it for is chopping up onions, a frequent task I hate to do by hand.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


I like using onions in cooking (can not stand them raw) and have serious issues with cutting them.

(I spent one summer working in a restaurant and almost died after spending an hour or so cutting up onions)

Is there somewhere to buy frozen onions?
Posted by: Doc Bill on Jan. 18 2009,16:58

I met this web designer recently and here's a site he did relevant to this thread.  (Who'd a thunk it?)

The guy in the videos is the designer.  Nice photography.


< StarCocktails >
Posted by: stevestory on Jan. 18 2009,17:11

Quote (khan @ Jan. 18 2009,17:41)
Is there somewhere to buy frozen onions?
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


frozen onions would be fine in something like chili, methinks, but not a recipe that requires them to have any firmness. The freezing process busts their cell walls and when they thaw they're mush.
Posted by: rhmc on Jan. 18 2009,18:57

as to hand powered onion "dicers", i have two:  a wally world onion dicer that produces 1/4" sections of a veggie (works great for pico de gallo with peppers and maters).  that was in the $12 range .  
a bass pro shop gizmo that was designed to french fry taters.  it has two sizes of grid  and the larger is about 1/2  inch.  cost was in the $20 range (on sale).

it will fling onion sections across the room. :)

for stir fry, i still have to slice 'em by hand to get the correct size - 1X1 or larger, usually larger.
Posted by: khan on Jan. 18 2009,20:15

Quote (stevestory @ Jan. 18 2009,18:11)
Quote (khan @ Jan. 18 2009,17:41)
Is there somewhere to buy frozen onions?
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


frozen onions would be fine in something like chili, methinks, but not a recipe that requires them to have any firmness. The freezing process busts their cell walls and when they thaw they're mush.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


One of my main uses of onions is as a bed under a roast of mammal or fowl.  Doesn't seem to matter if fresh or froze in that case.
Posted by: midwifetoad on Jan. 19 2009,16:33

< http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dkYZ6rbPU2M >
Posted by: deejay on Jan. 20 2009,08:33

Quote (Doc Bill @ Jan. 18 2009,17:58)
I met this web designer recently and here's a site he did relevant to this thread.  (Who'd a thunk it?)

The guy in the videos is the designer.  Nice photography.


< StarCocktails >
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Yes, the phototgraphy is really nice.  As for the music..., my wife thought I was watching porn when she heard it.  

Just another false positive for her XXXBanatory Filter.
Posted by: Tony M Nyphot on Jan. 20 2009,22:38

Quote (stevestory @ Jan. 17 2009,20:18)
I switched to Classico and Bertollis for marinara sauce.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Try out Muir Glen tomato products. For me at least, they have wonderful flavor, are not subjected a lye bath (NaOH) for peeling and can be found on sale frequently in the chain grocers.
Posted by: Tony M Nyphot on Jan. 20 2009,22:44

Quote (carlsonjok @ Jan. 09 2009,16:34)
I am currently making < Ale-sauced pork ribs and vegetables >.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


I made this 2 nights ago and per your suggestion used 1 tsp of salt. Upped the pepper to 1 tsp, used 5 cloves of garlic and added the juice from 1/2 the lemon. Didn't feel like wasting a Boddington's and bought a single of Guinness for the base liquid.

Came out pretty good...thanks for the link!

[...urrrp...]
Posted by: Tony M Nyphot on Jan. 20 2009,23:30

Quote (stevestory @ Jan. 18 2009,15:22)
               
Quote (Tony M Nyphot @ Jan. 09 2009,20:07)
               
Quote (stevestory @ Jan. 09 2009,16:41)
anybody have an recommendations on food processors? I've heard you either pay $30 and get a piece of crap or $200 and get something good. Any comments?
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


I can give you some recommendation‘s...

I can also provide info on food processor‘s.

Seriously though, it depends somewhat on what your purpose for using one is. That will guide a prescribed evolution to a final decision.

I have four in various sizes and formats for specialized purposes and 2 are manually operated. I love them so...
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


The thing I'd mostly use it for is chopping up onions, a frequent task I hate to do by hand.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


[personal opinion]

1. The small, < wave-blade style hand choppers > are fairly worthless.

2. Expensive food processors (< Cuisinart >) can do a decent job, but often turn them to mush.

3. < Smaller versions > are great if you only need finely chopped onions.

4. One of the most indispensable, multi-use kitchen tools I own is a < mandolin >, especially when Grisman visits. Nothing else comes close to creating thin slices if that's what you're after. There are cheaper versions around, but avoid the OXO.

5. I've only used while preparing meals at a friend's home, but a version of < this > worked well.

6. If it's just a matter of st^inky fingers, a cheap < onion holder > can be used, or rub your hands on stainless steel immediately after chopping.

[/personal opinion]

I was taught by a french freedom chef how to chop an onion similar to what is seen < here >. I was taught to not cut all the way through on the horizontal and first vertical cuts and this holds the half together while chopping. By varying the number of cuts, it is easy to control the size of the chop. After years of doing this, I can chop an onion in under a minute, but not quite < this fast >. For me, it's just not worth the time it takes to retrieve a piece of equipment that I have to clean afterwards. Laziness rules.

[ETA: a longer < how-to version >]
Posted by: Tracy P. Hamilton on Jan. 21 2009,08:19

Quote (Tony M Nyphot @ Jan. 20 2009,23:30)

I was taught by a french freedom chef how to chop an onion similar to what is seen < here >. I was taught to not cut all the way through on the horizontal and first vertical cuts and this holds the half together while chopping. By varying the number of cuts, it is easy to control the size of the chop. After years of doing this, I can chop an onion in under a minute, but not quite < this fast >. For me, it's just not worth the time it takes to retrieve a piece of equipment that I have to clean afterwards. Laziness rules.

[ETA: a longer < how-to version >]
---------------------QUOTE-------------------



Would that piece of equipment be a finger, by any chance?  :O
Posted by: midwifetoad on Jan. 21 2009,10:00

I have a numbr of German knives that I thought were pretty good, and I've been a skeptic of the expensive Japanese knives.

But I got a Shun knife for Christmas, and jobs like chopping vegetables are transformed.

That, plus you can have the knife factory resharpened forever for the price of postage.
Posted by: stevestory on Jan. 21 2009,11:31

knife factories get dull?
Posted by: Arden Chatfield on Jan. 21 2009,11:47

Quote (stevestory @ Jan. 21 2009,09:31)
knife factories get dull?
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Eight hours a day on the floor, five days a week, day in day out, same thing every day, no chance of promotion, I can see that.
Posted by: Tony M Nyphot on Jan. 21 2009,12:00

An exchange that shows one of the reasons I love coming here...
     
Quote (midwifetoad @ Jan. 21 2009,09:00)
But I got a Shun knife for Christmas, and jobs like chopping vegetables are transformed.

That, plus you can have the knife factory resharpened forever for the price of postage.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


 
Quote (stevestory @ Jan. 21 2009,09:31)
knife factories get dull?
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


 
Quote (Arden Chatfield @ Jan. 21 2009,10:47)
   
Eight hours a day on the floor, five days a week, day in day out, same thing every day, no chance of promotion, I can see that.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------



Well that...and realizing that without AtBC, I would never have learned about Arden's mum, who never needs sharpening.
Posted by: Arden Chatfield on Jan. 21 2009,12:05

Quote (Tony M Nyphot @ Jan. 21 2009,10:00)
An exchange that shows one of the reasons I love coming here...
         
Quote (midwifetoad @ Jan. 21 2009,09:00)
But I got a Shun knife for Christmas, and jobs like chopping vegetables are transformed.

That, plus you can have the knife factory resharpened forever for the price of postage.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


     
Quote (stevestory @ Jan. 21 2009,09:31)
knife factories get dull?
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


     
Quote (Arden Chatfield @ Jan. 21 2009,10:47)
   
Eight hours a day on the floor, five days a week, day in day out, same thing every day, no chance of promotion, I can see that.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------



Well that...and realizing that without AtBC, I would never have learned about Arden's mum, who never needs sharpening.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


I get my knife sharpened at your mom's house at least once a week, ifyouknowwhatImeanandIthinkyoudo...
Posted by: Tony M Nyphot on Jan. 21 2009,12:08

Quote (Arden Chatfield @ Jan. 21 2009,11:05)
 
Quote (Tony M Nyphot @ Jan. 21 2009,10:00)
An exchange that shows one of the reasons I love coming here...
             
Quote (midwifetoad @ Jan. 21 2009,09:00)
But I got a Shun knife for Christmas, and jobs like chopping vegetables are transformed.

That, plus you can have the knife factory resharpened forever for the price of postage.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


       
Quote (stevestory @ Jan. 21 2009,09:31)
knife factories get dull?
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


       
Quote (Arden Chatfield @ Jan. 21 2009,10:47)
   
Eight hours a day on the floor, five days a week, day in day out, same thing every day, no chance of promotion, I can see that.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------



Well that...and realizing that without AtBC, I would never have learned about Arden's mum, who never needs sharpening.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


I get my knife sharpened at your mom's house at least once a week, ifyouknowwhatImeanandIthinkyoudo...
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Yes, I'm afraid I do and distresses me greatly...she died 20 years ago.
Posted by: Arden Chatfield on Jan. 21 2009,12:08

Quote (Tony M Nyphot @ Jan. 21 2009,10:08)
Quote (Arden Chatfield @ Jan. 21 2009,11:05)
 
Quote (Tony M Nyphot @ Jan. 21 2009,10:00)
An exchange that shows one of the reasons I love coming here...
             
Quote (midwifetoad @ Jan. 21 2009,09:00)
But I got a Shun knife for Christmas, and jobs like chopping vegetables are transformed.

That, plus you can have the knife factory resharpened forever for the price of postage.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


         
Quote (stevestory @ Jan. 21 2009,09:31)
knife factories get dull?
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


         
Quote (Arden Chatfield @ Jan. 21 2009,10:47)
   
Eight hours a day on the floor, five days a week, day in day out, same thing every day, no chance of promotion, I can see that.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------



Well that...and realizing that without AtBC, I would never have learned about Arden's mum, who never needs sharpening.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


I get my knife sharpened at your mom's house at least once a week, ifyouknowwhatImeanandIthinkyoudo...
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Yes, I'm afraid I do and distresses me greatly...she died 20 years ago.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Nah, she just smells like it.
Posted by: Tony M Nyphot on Jan. 21 2009,12:12

Quote (Arden Chatfield @ Jan. 21 2009,11:08)
Quote (Tony M Nyphot @ Jan. 21 2009,10:08)
Quote (Arden Chatfield @ Jan. 21 2009,11:05)
   
Quote (Tony M Nyphot @ Jan. 21 2009,10:00)
An exchange that shows one of the reasons I love coming here...
               
Quote (midwifetoad @ Jan. 21 2009,09:00)
But I got a Shun knife for Christmas, and jobs like chopping vegetables are transformed.

That, plus you can have the knife factory resharpened forever for the price of postage.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


         
Quote (stevestory @ Jan. 21 2009,09:31)
knife factories get dull?
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


         
Quote (Arden Chatfield @ Jan. 21 2009,10:47)
   
Eight hours a day on the floor, five days a week, day in day out, same thing every day, no chance of promotion, I can see that.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------



Well that...and realizing that without AtBC, I would never have learned about Arden's mum, who never needs sharpening.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


I get my knife sharpened at your mom's house at least once a week, ifyouknowwhatImeanandIthinkyoudo...
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Yes, I'm afraid I do and distresses me greatly...she died 20 years ago.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Nah, she just smells like it.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


No, I think that's steve's st^inky onions...
Posted by: midwifetoad on Jan. 21 2009,12:22

You guys all deserve Shunning.

ifyouknowwhatImeanandIthinkyoudo...
Posted by: carlsonjok on Jan. 21 2009,12:30

Quote (midwifetoad @ Jan. 21 2009,12:22)
You guys all deserve Shunning.

ifyouknowwhatImeanandIthinkyoudo...
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


HA HA THIS IS YOU


Posted by: Arden Chatfield on Jan. 21 2009,13:08

Quote (midwifetoad @ Jan. 21 2009,10:22)
You guys all deserve Shunning.

ifyouknowwhatImeanandIthinkyoudo...
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Hey, you're the one who thinks factories need sharpening.
Posted by: JohnW on Jan. 23 2009,16:17

I know this is stretching the definition of "comestible to it's very limit, but in honour of Burns Night: < make your own haggis >.


---------------------QUOTE-------------------
First of all. A sheep's 'pluck' is the windpipe, lungs, heart and liver which you'll need to order direct from a butcher. If you've been good to him all year, he probably won't charge you. Slaughter regulations mean that any food-safe pluck will have had the windpipe removed and the lungs will have been cut across for inspection. This makes little difference as, in traditional recipes, the windpipe was merely hung over the edge of the pot to remove 'impurities' (read sheepsnot) and not included in the stuffing. You will, however, have to keep your eye on the simmering pot as the same 'impurities' can cause a disturbing brown froth to form if boiled too hard. Not in any way to the detriment of the finished product but visually reminiscent of something in a cheap 50's sci-fi shocker.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Posted by: Louis on Jan. 28 2009,12:54

Paging TeveTory, paging TeveTory,



Louis
Posted by: J-Dog on Jan. 28 2009,14:37

Quote (Louis @ Jan. 28 2009,12:54)
Paging TeveTory, paging TeveTory,



Louis
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Ahem

As you of course realize, it's only science if you can measure it.

So. Does the picture represent the output of

1 year
1 month
1 week
1 tough-ass day as moderator....

for "Mr. Teve Tory "?
Posted by: deejay on Jan. 28 2009,17:48



---------------------QUOTE-------------------
So. Does the picture represent the output of

1 year
1 month
1 week
1 tough-ass day as moderator....

for "Mr. Teve Tory "?

---------------------QUOTE-------------------



Or a really, really, tough ass day?



< link >
Posted by: stevestory on Jan. 28 2009,18:11

Quote (J-Dog @ Jan. 28 2009,15:37)
Quote (Louis @ Jan. 28 2009,12:54)
Paging TeveTory, paging TeveTory,



Louis
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Ahem

As you of course realize, it's only science if you can measure it.

So. Does the picture represent the output of

1 year
1 month
1 week
1 tough-ass day as moderator....

for "Mr. Teve Tory "?
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


You'd be surprised.  I've got some triathlons coming up in the spring I'm getting ready for. So I'm on a ...well, not strict, but not too libertine diet these days. The general schedule I follow is no drinking Sunday through Thursday. Friday and Saturday are my cheat days, i can do what I want. But during the week I'm annoyingly sober. And eating lots of veggies. I think I've eaten somewhere over a pound of stir fry veggies so far today.

Although to be fair, Friday and Saturday do tend to resemble that picture, although vodka bottles instead of beer cans. My tolerance is so high I can't get a buzz off beer without drinking like a gallon of it, and that's uncomfortable.

Next triathlon I do, probably late march, I'll post a link to the results.
Posted by: khan on Jan. 28 2009,18:23

Quote (stevestory @ Jan. 28 2009,19:11)
Quote (J-Dog @ Jan. 28 2009,15:37)
Quote (Louis @ Jan. 28 2009,12:54)
Paging TeveTory, paging TeveTory,



Louis
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Ahem

As you of course realize, it's only science if you can measure it.

So. Does the picture represent the output of

1 year
1 month
1 week
1 tough-ass day as moderator....

for "Mr. Teve Tory "?
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


You'd be surprised.  I've got some triathlons coming up in the spring I'm getting ready for. So I'm on a ...well, not strict, but not too libertine diet these days. The general schedule I follow is no drinking Sunday through Thursday. Friday and Saturday are my cheat days, i can do what I want. But during the week I'm annoyingly sober. And eating lots of veggies. I think I've eaten somewhere over a pound of stir fry veggies so far today.

Although to be fair, Friday and Saturday do tend to resemble that picture, although vodka bottles instead of beer cans. My tolerance is so high I can't get a buzz off beer without drinking like a gallon of it, and that's uncomfortable.

Next triathlon I do, probably late march, I'll post a link to the results.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Vodka?

I'm down to boxed wine.
Posted by: Arden Chatfield on Jan. 28 2009,18:53

HA HA THIS IS STEVE:


Posted by: stevestory on Jan. 29 2009,00:00

Quote (Arden Chatfield @ Jan. 28 2009,19:53)
HA HA THIS IS STEVE:


---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Oh lordy. Thank god I don't drink like I used to. A friend who was in Cosmo last year sent me this photo from a party.



That was from several years ago. Since we can still focus on the camera, I can tell that this was whole Minutes before we passed out. I enjoyed my blasted-every-night days, but I more enjoy nowadays, where I can swim a mile and then jog 3 miles home.

(although I wasn't in really horrible shape then. My recovering alcoholic roommate Tom would ask, "How the fuck can you drink a fifth, wake up, and swim 32 laps? Seriously dude How The Fuck?" Excercise makes hangovers better, is my only response.)
Posted by: stevestory on Jan. 29 2009,00:05

I watched Burn After Reading again, after seeing it yesterday, and I liked it a lot more the second time. And at some point, Malkovich is waiting as the clock ticks 4:55. I wonder where this 5 o'clock rule came from. The weekend days where I still drink, I like to wait til 10 or so. That way I can compress all the drinks together. That pairs the intense experience with a small absolute number of drinks, so, drunk + no hangover.
Posted by: stevestory on Jan. 29 2009,00:13

BTW, i don't mean to sound like I had such great times. It was pretty rough, by some standards. You couldn't pay me to go back to 2005. If you have to have 3 drinks not to get a buzz, but to get normal, your current lifestyle is a temporary one.
Posted by: stevestory on Jan. 29 2009,00:32

Seriously, if anyone knows where the 5 o'clock thing came from, please let us know.
Posted by: carlsonjok on Jan. 29 2009,05:47

Quote (stevestory @ Jan. 29 2009,00:32)
Seriously, if anyone knows where the 5 o'clock thing came from, please let us know.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Well, there is < this song >.
Posted by: KCdgw on Jan. 29 2009,08:20

Quote (stevestory @ Jan. 29 2009,00:32)
Seriously, if anyone knows where the 5 o'clock thing came from, please let us know.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------



It's probably from the traditional 9-5 workday.  5PM is also probably when many 'Happy Hours' begin. I wait until the sun is over the yardarm myself.

KC
Posted by: Shirley Knott on Jan. 29 2009,09:36

I always follow my mother's advice:
Rule 1>never drink before noon
Rule 2>never specify the time zone

hugs,
Shirley Knott
Posted by: deejay on Jan. 29 2009,09:44

Quote (stevestory @ Jan. 29 2009,01:32)
Seriously, if anyone knows where the 5 o'clock thing came from, please let us know.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


It's a convenient shorthand for the general rationalizations for drinking ("Hey, it's after work!  Party time!!!") and rules for consumption (I'm not going to be one of those stinking daytime drunks!") that substance abusers come up with to justify their behavior as their control over it starts to slip away. Because there's a certain inherent irrationality to the "rule", you're going to have a hard time finding a solid philosophical rooting for it.  Of course I'm sure it works reasonably well for some people.  

A friend of mine told me all this.

I like Cohen brothers movies a lot, and I think they get held to a higher standard than most filmmakers.  They're so massively talented, and it's almost as if they're obnoxiously reminding you of that fact when they repeatedly hammer on their characters' weaknesses and flaws.  Showing Malkovich's character run afoul of the 5PM rule, which itself is a cliche, was a pretty crude way to show his.  But they nailed all the details, such as the use of the shot glass to measure the alcohol.  His character was screaming to himself he was in control, whereas it was screamingly obvious to the viewer that he wasn't.

[/pedantic armchair psychologist and highly amateur film critic]
Posted by: Kristine on Jan. 29 2009,12:36

Quote (stevestory @ Jan. 29 2009,00:05)
I watched Burn After Reading again, after seeing it yesterday, and I liked it a lot more the second time. And at some point, Malkovich is waiting as the clock ticks 4:55. I wonder where this 5 o'clock rule came from. The weekend days where I still drink, I like to wait til 10 or so. That way I can compress all the drinks together. That pairs the intense experience with a small absolute number of drinks, so, drunk + no hangover.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


What 5 o'clock rule? < Evolution demands more Facebook drunkfail >.

Ain't evo-pop psych/rationalizations wonderful? :p

P.S. Never go to 8 AM jazz dance class with a hangover. (Okay, okay, but that was a long time ago!;)
Posted by: rhmc on Jan. 29 2009,16:24

Quote (Shirley Knott @ Jan. 29 2009,10:36)
I always follow my mother's advice:
Rule 1>never drink before noon
Rule 2>never specify the time zone

hugs,
Shirley Knott
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


there are only two times when i drink.

daytime and nighttime.
Posted by: khan on Jan. 29 2009,16:29

Quote (Kristine @ Jan. 29 2009,13:36)
Quote (stevestory @ Jan. 29 2009,00:05)
I watched Burn After Reading again, after seeing it yesterday, and I liked it a lot more the second time. And at some point, Malkovich is waiting as the clock ticks 4:55. I wonder where this 5 o'clock rule came from. The weekend days where I still drink, I like to wait til 10 or so. That way I can compress all the drinks together. That pairs the intense experience with a small absolute number of drinks, so, drunk + no hangover.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


What 5 o'clock rule? < Evolution demands more Facebook drunkfail >.

Ain't evo-pop psych/rationalizations wonderful? :p

P.S. Never go to 8 AM jazz dance class with a hangover. (Okay, okay, but that was a long time ago!)
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


An 8AM calculus class with a hangover is interesting.

Why am I still alive?
Posted by: Kristine on Jan. 29 2009,17:20

Because it wasn't a jazz dance class.
Posted by: deejay on Jan. 30 2009,09:45

So what are people eating/drinking for the Super Bowl ™ Big Game?  

I'm headed < here > to pick up meat for some chicken and andouille jambalaya.  According to Wikipedia, I make it the inauthentic way by cooking the rice separately in chicken stock and adding it to the pot afterwards, rather than by cooking the rice in the pot with all the meat juices and added stock.  It's still good by me, and I'll be pressed for time on Sunday.  

We've got some Dogfish Head 60 minute IPA and Guinness Draught on hand, plus I can whip up some margaritas with fresh squeezed lime juice.  

I'm fine withy my inauthentic jambalaya, but I'm more militant with my margaritas.  It's supposed to be a 3:2:1 ratio of tequila : triple sec : lime juice, or apparently 7:4:3 according to the IBA.  Either way, it's half tequila and no sugar.  Go to a bar and order a margarita, and it will be half sour mix, which is of course sweeter than soda.  That's good for disguising some cheap booze, but right now I'm using Patron silver and Cointreau.  I also make them with 1800 Reposado and Grand Marnier, but I prefer the former.  I'm looking to finish off that bottle of 1800 and pick up something else if anyone has any suggestions.
Posted by: J-Dog on Jan. 30 2009,10:38



Regrettably, my wife will not allow the selfless, caring Hooters Girls to make house calls, but she will allow us to partake of this on our wings.

I would love a nice warm room temperature Guinness to go with them, but it's just not as good in the bottles.

Party on dudes, and dudettes.
Posted by: Tracy P. Hamilton on Jan. 30 2009,12:00

Quote (deejay @ Jan. 30 2009,09:45)
So what are people eating/drinking for the Super Bowl ™ Big Game?  

I'm headed < here > to pick up meat for some chicken and andouille jambalaya.  According to Wikipedia, I make it the inauthentic way by cooking the rice separately in chicken stock and adding it to the pot afterwards, rather than by cooking the rice in the pot with all the meat juices and added stock.  It's still good by me, and I'll be pressed for time on Sunday.  

We've got some Dogfish Head 60 minute IPA and Guinness Draught on hand, plus I can whip up some margaritas with fresh squeezed lime juice.  

I'm fine withy my inauthentic jambalaya, but I'm more militant with my margaritas.  It's supposed to be a 3:2:1 ratio of tequila : triple sec : lime juice, or apparently 7:4:3 according to the IBA.  Either way, it's half tequila and no sugar.  Go to a bar and order a margarita, and it will be half sour mix, which is of course sweeter than soda.  That's good for disguising some cheap booze, but right now I'm using Patron silver and Cointreau.  I also make them with 1800 Reposado and Grand Marnier, but I prefer the former.  I'm looking to finish off that bottle of 1800 and pick up something else if anyone has any suggestions.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Pulled pork BBQ
Chili (chipotles in adobo sauce included)
black bean salsa
Homebrew: Oatmeal Stout and India Pale Amber
Posted by: deejay on Jan. 30 2009,12:32

Quote (Tracy P. Hamilton @ Jan. 30 2009,13:00)
Pulled pork BBQ
Chili (chipotles in adobo sauce included)
black bean salsa
Homebrew: Oatmeal Stout and India Pale Amber
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Awesome!  Are you making the pulled pork yourself?  I picked up Steven Raichlen's "How to Grill" a few years back as an entry level text, and of course as long as I'm living in this apartment, I'll be stuck on entry level.  He's got a recipe in there for pulled pork, and he talks about regional variations.  I'm not much of a pork fan, but I just love a good pulled pork sandwich.
Posted by: deejay on Jan. 30 2009,12:36

Quote (J-Dog @ Jan. 30 2009,11:38)
Regrettably, my wife will not allow the selfless, caring Hooters Girls to make house calls, but she will allow us to partake of this on our wings.

I would love a nice warm room temperature Guinness to go with them, but it's just not as good in the bottles.

Party on dudes, and dudettes.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Nice!  I'd make some wings myself, but the jambalaya is probably about all the spice I need.  What's your technique?  I like to bake them first, and then fry them.  If you're not frying, you're not trying.  The nice thing about baking them first is that you don't need to worry about fully cooking them in the fryer; you can just get them to your desired level of crispiness.

Maybe you could convince your wife to don the tight white shirt and orange shorts.
Posted by: Tony M Nyphot on Jan. 30 2009,12:45

Quote (deejay @ Jan. 30 2009,08:45)
That's good for disguising some cheap booze, but right now I'm using Patron silver and Cointreau.  I also make them with 1800 Reposado and Grand Marnier, but I prefer the former.  I'm looking to finish off that bottle of 1800 and pick up something else if anyone has any suggestions.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


...mmmmmm... tequila...

A few years back, a group of friends gathered at my house for the weekend for a field study of commercially available tequilas, orange liqueurs, margaritas and a subjective evaluation of taste versus cost. Between all of us, we had over 20 different bottles of tequila and 5 orange liqueurs and set up endless blind taste tests. All in the name of science, you understand.

For straight shots, Patron Silver was 3rd behind Gran Centenario Añejo and Milagro Añejo. It was interesting that a silver placed this high, even above the other Patron types.

In the margarita tests, we used the same homemade "mix" (2.5x fresh squeezed lime, 1x fresh squeezed white grapefruit, .5x Agave nectar) and varied the combinations of tequila and orange. It took the entire weekend, but, like Sisyphus, we drudgingly persevered. The Gran Centenario again topped the list with Cointreau and Patron Citronge leading the orange category.

Coming in at 3rd in their respective idioms on the margarita tests, and dominating the value/taste test, were El Jimador Reposado tequila and Gran Gala orange liqueur (above Grand Marnier!). The El Jimador was 1/2 the cost of the Patron and in a direct margarita face-off actually came out ahead. The Gran Gala costs less than than the elite liqueurs and may even bring a bit more orange to the palate. The El Jimador is made by Herradura.

I enjoy margaritas immensely, but at some point it seems a waste to mix really expensive tequila when you can enjoy it's smoothness straight instead. I just received a bottle a bottle of Don Julio Reposado as a gift this morning...perhaps we'll crack it on Sunday.

More than likely, I'll be drinking Pilsner Urquell for the Super Bowl.
Posted by: deejay on Jan. 30 2009,13:32

Thanks for the reply, Tony M, and all the wisdom imparted.  I hear you on the whole straight vs. mixed in a margarita issue on quality tequila.  I'm going to have to try the mix you used with the agave nectar.  I'm not too surprised that Grand Marnier was outdone in the orange category; I think it's the weak link in the 1800 margarita I make.  I just might pick up that El Jimador if I don't splurge on something fancier when the 1800 is gone.  Your experiments were indeed heroic.

I'm headed off to NH for the weekend, and then back Sunday at 4 Eastern, with just enough time to cook before kickoff.  I really look forward to reading more replies when i get back.
Posted by: J-Dog on Jan. 30 2009,14:04

Quote (deejay @ Jan. 30 2009,12:36)
Maybe you could convince your wife to don the tight white shirt and orange shorts.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


I'd rather convince her to doff the tight white shirt and orange shorts.

Ba Dum BUMP!
Posted by: Tracy P. Hamilton on Jan. 30 2009,16:24

Quote (J-Dog @ Jan. 30 2009,10:38)
I would love a nice warm room temperature Guinness to go with them, but it's just not as good in the bottles.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Depends on which bottle.  The Draught bottles (and cans) are pretty close to the draft Guinness.  The bottled Guinness with the tan label - different recipe!
Posted by: Tony M Nyphot on Jan. 30 2009,16:47

Quote (deejay @ Jan. 30 2009,12:32)
Thanks for the reply, Tony M, and all the wisdom imparted.  I hear you on the whole straight vs. mixed in a margarita issue on quality tequila.  I'm going to have to try the mix you used with the agave nectar.  I'm not too surprised that Grand Marnier was outdone in the orange category; I think it's the weak link in the 1800 margarita I make.  I just might pick up that El Jimador if I don't splurge on something fancier when the 1800 is gone.  Your experiments were indeed heroic.

I'm headed off to NH for the weekend, and then back Sunday at 4 Eastern, with just enough time to cook before kickoff.  I really look forward to reading more replies when i get back.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


I typed up that response just before leaving to a lunch meeting...which ended up at a Mexican restaurant...with clients who don't partake of the spiritual world (at least the fermented kind).

Because of the prelude, for the entire lunch, my thoughts were dominated by how good a margarita would taste right NOW! DAMN IT!

So, on the way home I stopped to pick up some limes and voilà:



BTW: My favorite marg is with Patron Silver and Gran Gala.

Son of BTW: The mix I described previously goes with 6x tequila and 3x orange, doesn't conform to "standards" but sure is good.

Bride of BTW: It's hard to take a steady picture with a hand-held laptop

Louis‘s Mother BTW: I'm off to the mountains to schuss the steep and fluffy
Posted by: deejay on Feb. 01 2009,15:21

Hi Tony M-

Happy Birthday!!!! It looks like if you try to match your age in shots, you won't make it to the next one.  Happy tipping of the wrists, and enjoy the game or whatever you're doing!!!

Time to start chopping the peppers!
Posted by: deejay on Feb. 01 2009,15:22

Quote (J-Dog @ Jan. 30 2009,15:04)
Quote (deejay @ Jan. 30 2009,12:36)
Maybe you could convince your wife to don the tight white shirt and orange shorts.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


I'd rather convince her to doff the tight white shirt and orange shorts.

Ba Dum BUMP!
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


I like the proper emphasis on the bumping ;)
Posted by: stevestory on Feb. 01 2009,22:30

Quote (J-Dog @ Jan. 30 2009,11:38)


Regrettably, my wife will not allow the selfless, caring Hooters Girls to make house calls, but she will allow us to partake of this on our wings.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Huh. My girlfriend adores Hooters's wings, but I've never had them. If you like them too, I'm going to have to try them.
Posted by: stevestory on Feb. 01 2009,22:34

as an experiment, i cooked up 3 batches of ribs in the oven. One batch drenched in Worstecheichiecheire sauce, one in Valentina hot sauce, and one in in a dry rub of creole seasonings plus thyme.

results.

Wo...uh Wooster-sure sauce, mediocre.
Valentina hot sauce, inedible.
Creole plus lots of thyme--holy crap that was good.
Posted by: Louis on Feb. 02 2009,03:40

Quote (stevestory @ Feb. 02 2009,04:30)
Quote (J-Dog @ Jan. 30 2009,11:38)


Regrettably, my wife will not allow the selfless, caring Hooters Girls to make house calls, but she will allow us to partake of this on our wings.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Huh. My girlfriend adores Hooters's wings, but I've never had them. If you like them too, I'm going to have to try them.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


I like Hooters wings too, they're not bad. There's even a Hooters here in the UK where you can get them. However, Hooters as a concept really doesn't work here. It's a cultural thing.

Louis
Posted by: carlsonjok on Feb. 02 2009,05:08

Quote (Louis @ Feb. 02 2009,03:40)
I like Hooters wings too, they're not bad. There's even a Hooters here in the UK where you can get them. However, Hooters as a concept really doesn't work here. It's a cultural thing.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


I see what you mean.


Posted by: Louis on Feb. 02 2009,06:43

Quote (carlsonjok @ Feb. 02 2009,11:08)
Quote (Louis @ Feb. 02 2009,03:40)
I like Hooters wings too, they're not bad. There's even a Hooters here in the UK where you can get them. However, Hooters as a concept really doesn't work here. It's a cultural thing.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


I see what you mean.


---------------------QUOTE-------------------


That's bad enough, but being asked "If you want fries with that" in a really thick Brummie* accent totally ruins a) the delightfully tacky nature of Hooters, b) the nice boobies partially on display, and c) the flavour of the hot sauce and wings. Thereby ruining the whole experience.

Louis

* See < here > for an example. I think this is, at least, an authentic Brummie accent (think Ozzy Osbourne) as opposed to the millions of poor imitations out there. No disrespect to the residents of Birmingham, wonderful city, I have frequented many of your bars and drinking establishments over the years. It's just that cheesy, mildly sexy, tacky waitressing in a pseudo titty bar with decent wings is best done in an American accent (preferably Californian and perky) IMO.
Posted by: J-Dog on Feb. 02 2009,08:42

Quote (Louis @ Feb. 02 2009,06:43)
It's just that cheesy, mildly sexy, tacky waitressing in a pseudo titty bar with decent wings is best done in an American accent (preferably Californian and perky) IMO.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Perky in both respects is good!
Posted by: midwifetoad on Feb. 02 2009,08:51

Hard to beat a wing sauce that has butter as it's first ingredient.
Posted by: Wesley R. Elsberry on Feb. 02 2009,23:28

< Tilting at Windmill (Cookies): Trans Fat Math >

When is zero not really zero? When it is said of trans fat in food.
Posted by: Erasmus, FCD on Feb. 03 2009,07:04

Go Vols Orange and pantyhose makes me lose my appetite.  

the rare occasions I have been forced into a Hooters i have been saddened by the wives who probably swallow a lump and say "I love Hooters" to go along.  they look bored.
Posted by: carlsonjok on Feb. 03 2009,07:07

Quote (Wesley R. Elsberry @ Feb. 02 2009,23:28)
< Tilting at Windmill (Cookies): Trans Fat Math >

When is zero not really zero? When it is said of trans fat in food.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


You know, the last time I made fried chicken I was surprised to see that Crisco had zero trans fat.  Now I guess I know why.
Posted by: Louis on Feb. 03 2009,07:11

Quote (Erasmus, FCD @ Feb. 03 2009,13:04)
Go Vols Orange and pantyhose makes me lose my appetite.  

the rare occasions I have been forced into a Hooters i have been saddened by the wives who probably swallow a lump and say "I love Hooters" to go along.  they look bored.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


I'd agree with you that Hooters isn't exactly an establishment of enlightened values, the problem is the wings are actually quite good.

It's like the Nazis. You don't have to agree with their policy on racial purity and genocide to enjoy their lovely, lovely gold. Just look at Switzerland.

Hmmmm.

I'll get me coat.

Louis
Posted by: carlsonjok on Feb. 03 2009,07:13

Quote (Erasmus, FCD @ Feb. 03 2009,07:04)
Go Vols Orange and pantyhose makes me lose my appetite.  
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


So, I guess you aren't a Pat Summitt fan?
Posted by: stevestory on Feb. 05 2009,00:13

Big freeze in Fla tonight. Glad I'm not planting my < Heirloom 'maters > for another month.

NOM NOM NOM.
Posted by: Tony M Nyphot on Feb. 07 2009,18:32

I was reminded of s.story while grilling a snack today.

Thin sliced black forest ham layered with 2 types of gruyère and baby swiss on homemade pumpernickel. No onions.


Posted by: khan on Feb. 07 2009,19:07

Tried something interesting yesterday.

I have lamented not finding good bread; found some decent rye at the grocery store.

Ate some sliced with raw ground beef and a bit of salt.

Heated up the cast iron skillet, dropped in some ghee, dropped in hollowed out slice of rye, cracked in an egg, covered for 2 minutes, turned and sprinkled on teeny bit of cheese, covered for 1 minute.

Sprinkled on some garlic powder.

Not bad at all.

(Don't have a toaster)
Posted by: J-Dog on Feb. 07 2009,20:35

Tony & Khan = YUM YUM!  I hope you brought enough to share with the class????  I am going to have to stop reading this thread when I am hungry...:(
Posted by: Bing on Feb. 08 2009,13:12

Quote (khan @ Feb. 07 2009,19:07)
Heated up the cast iron skillet, dropped in some ghee, dropped in hollowed out slice of rye, cracked in an egg, covered for 2 minutes, turned and sprinkled on teeny bit of cheese, covered for 1 minute.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


That is what my scouser Nana referred to as "Toad-in-a-hole".

My kids still love it.
Posted by: Arden Chatfield on Feb. 09 2009,02:29

< Oh. My. God. >
Posted by: carlsonjok on Feb. 09 2009,05:40

Quote (Arden Chatfield @ Feb. 09 2009,02:29)
< Oh. My. God. >
---------------------QUOTE-------------------



Posted by: Arden Chatfield on Feb. 09 2009,12:44

Quote (carlsonjok @ Feb. 09 2009,03:40)
Quote (Arden Chatfield @ Feb. 09 2009,02:29)
< Oh. My. God. >
---------------------QUOTE-------------------



---------------------QUOTE-------------------


< Ah, here's where it all began. >

Now I want one.  :angry:
Posted by: Arden Chatfield on Feb. 11 2009,13:54

< All bow. >
Posted by: Louis on Feb. 11 2009,14:20

Quote (Arden Chatfield @ Feb. 11 2009,19:54)
< All bow. >
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Pffffff no < Stonners? >

Louis

P.S. That website is obscene, literally. Most of what is on there is, IMO, inedible. Krispy Kreme cheddar bacon cheeseburgers? Bleugh. Vomit.
Posted by: carlsonjok on Feb. 11 2009,14:33

Quote (Louis @ Feb. 11 2009,14:20)
Quote (Arden Chatfield @ Feb. 11 2009,19:54)
< All bow. >
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Pffffff no < Stonners? >

Louis

P.S. That website is obscene, literally. Most of what is on there is, IMO, inedible. Krispy Kreme cheddar bacon cheeseburgers? Bleugh. Vomit.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Hey, you went to school in upstate New York.  In all that time, you never had a Nick Tahoe's Garbage Plate?*



* In the interest of full disclosure, I grew up and went to college in Rochester and never had a Garbage Plate.
Posted by: ppb on Feb. 11 2009,14:39

Quote (carlsonjok @ Feb. 11 2009,15:33)
Quote (Louis @ Feb. 11 2009,14:20)
 
Quote (Arden Chatfield @ Feb. 11 2009,19:54)
< All bow. >
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Pffffff no < Stonners? >

Louis

P.S. That website is obscene, literally. Most of what is on there is, IMO, inedible. Krispy Kreme cheddar bacon cheeseburgers? Bleugh. Vomit.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Hey, you went to school in upstate New York.  In all that time, you never had a Nick Tahoe's Garbage Plate?*



* In the interest of full disclosure, I grew up and went to college in Rochester and never had a Garbage Plate.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Hey, my brother has worked at Nick Tahoe's.  Never had a Garbage Plate myself though.
Posted by: Arden Chatfield on Feb. 11 2009,14:43

Quote (Louis @ Feb. 11 2009,12:20)
That website is obscene, literally. Most of what is on there is, IMO, inedible.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


This from an Englishman????


Posted by: Arden Chatfield on Feb. 11 2009,14:45

Quote (carlsonjok @ Feb. 11 2009,12:33)
In the interest of full disclosure, I grew up
---------------------QUOTE-------------------



You're lying already.  :angry:
Posted by: Louis on Feb. 11 2009,17:14

Quote (carlsonjok @ Feb. 11 2009,20:33)
Quote (Louis @ Feb. 11 2009,14:20)
 
Quote (Arden Chatfield @ Feb. 11 2009,19:54)
< All bow. >
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Pffffff no < Stonners? >

Louis

P.S. That website is obscene, literally. Most of what is on there is, IMO, inedible. Krispy Kreme cheddar bacon cheeseburgers? Bleugh. Vomit.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Hey, you went to school in upstate New York.  In all that time, you never had a Nick Tahoe's Garbage Plate?*



* In the interest of full disclosure, I grew up and went to college in Rochester and never had a Garbage Plate.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Nahhh I must have missed out. I did have a lot of Buffalo wings though.

Louis
Posted by: Louis on Feb. 11 2009,17:26

Quote (Arden Chatfield @ Feb. 11 2009,20:43)
Quote (Louis @ Feb. 11 2009,12:20)
That website is obscene, literally. Most of what is on there is, IMO, inedible.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


This from an Englishman????


---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Nothing wrong with an occasional chip butty. Even though that one looks awful and badly made.

Dude when your list has baconnaise on it defending it as a bastion of anything edible is beyond possible.

Anyway the only thing I could contribute to the list is something created many years ago as an undergrad: The Special Pie Floater.

The Australian < Pie Floater > is a cult classic of cuisine, however there is room for (very dubious) "improvement".

Take one large bowl, put in one extra large, dinner plate sized Yorkshire pudding, fill about halfway up the bowl with good quality pea and ham soup. Add a second dinner plater sized Yorkshire pudding, fill with rich beef gravy (or pie appropriate gravy), add pie of choice. Cover with sauce. Eat.* A perfect accompaniment is beer, for a true Aussie experience I recommend Carlton Cold, it has the right balance of obnoxious fizziness and piss weak lageriness that typifies Aussie beer. Lovely. ETA: all ingredients are easily purchased, ready made from all good supermarkets, making the assembly of a Special Pie Floater an easy process taking only minutes to  get piping hot in a microwave.

Louis

*Like stonners, deep fried pizza, and tubs of Ben and Jerry's Cookie Dough ice cream, the NHS only allows you to have one of these a year before they refuse to treat you.
Posted by: Arden Chatfield on Feb. 11 2009,17:31

Quote (Louis @ Feb. 11 2009,15:26)
The Australian < Pie Floater > is a cult classic of cuisine, however there is room for (very dubious) "improvement".
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


From that site:

   

---------------------QUOTE-------------------
In 2003, the pie floater was recognised as a South Australian Heritage Icon by the National Trust of Australia.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------









*cough*
Posted by: Louis on Feb. 11 2009,17:34

Quote (Arden Chatfield @ Feb. 11 2009,23:31)
Quote (Louis @ Feb. 11 2009,15:26)
The Australian < Pie Floater > is a cult classic of cuisine, however there is room for (very dubious) "improvement".
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


From that site:

   

---------------------QUOTE-------------------
In 2003, the pie floater was recognised as a South Australian Heritage Icon by the National Trust of Australia.[
---------------------QUOTE-------------------









*cough*
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


So you're saying that the Groucho glasses, 'tache, brows, and nose were NOT an improvement to the Mona Lisa? The hard on on David? The arms, complete with uber hairy pits on Venus?

Pffff heathen.

Louis
Posted by: khan on Feb. 22 2009,13:50

I do most cooking in a 10" cast iron pan.

As I was preheating it today, I smelled all its oniony, garlicky, ghee-y goodness.
Posted by: J-Dog on Feb. 22 2009,17:13

Quote (khan @ Feb. 22 2009,13:50)
I do most cooking in a 10" cast iron pan.

As I was preheating it today, I smelled all its oniony, garlicky, ghee-y goodness.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


What time should we all show up for dinner?
Posted by: khan on Feb. 22 2009,17:22

Quote (J-Dog @ Feb. 22 2009,18:13)
Quote (khan @ Feb. 22 2009,13:50)
I do most cooking in a 10" cast iron pan.

As I was preheating it today, I smelled all its oniony, garlicky, ghee-y goodness.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


What time should we all show up for dinner?
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


8PM

And BYOC (critter).
Posted by: Arden Chatfield on Feb. 22 2009,19:32


Posted by: carlsonjok on Feb. 22 2009,19:37

Quote (Arden Chatfield @ Feb. 22 2009,19:32)

---------------------QUOTE-------------------


< Bacon tastes good, pork chops taste good. >
Posted by: Erasmus, FCD on Feb. 22 2009,19:43

almost allium tricoccum time again.  i whetted my palate during christmas, but next weekend i'll be looking for an army of delicate purple noses poking up through beech leaves and frosty dirt.  ahhh.  maybe i'll find an orange peel fungus and dig up some jerusalem artichokes, stuff me a chicken.  and then put that stuff in the chicken and cook it.
Posted by: Arden Chatfield on Feb. 22 2009,19:45

Quote (carlsonjok @ Feb. 22 2009,17:37)
   
Quote (Arden Chatfield @ Feb. 22 2009,19:32)

---------------------QUOTE-------------------


< Bacon tastes good, pork chops taste good. >
---------------------QUOTE-------------------



Posted by: Arden Chatfield on Feb. 22 2009,19:46

Quote (Erasmus @ FCD,Feb. 22 2009,17:43)
stuff me a chicken
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Is that what you guys down there call it?
Posted by: khan on Feb. 22 2009,19:49

Quote (Arden Chatfield @ Feb. 22 2009,20:46)
Quote (Erasmus @ FCD,Feb. 22 2009,17:43)
stuff me a chicken
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Is that what you guys down there call it?
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Stuff the chicken with various raw vegetables, and roast it at 400F for two hours.

Fragrant and tasty.
Posted by: carlsonjok on Feb. 22 2009,19:54

Quote (Erasmus, FCD @ Feb. 22 2009,19:43)
next weekend i'll be looking for an army of delicate purple noses poking up
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Okay, this is without a doubt, the gayest thing I have ever read on AtBC.
Posted by: Arden Chatfield on Feb. 22 2009,19:54

Quote (khan @ Feb. 22 2009,17:49)
Quote (Arden Chatfield @ Feb. 22 2009,20:46)
Quote (Erasmus @ FCD,Feb. 22 2009,17:43)
stuff me a chicken
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Is that what you guys down there call it?
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Stuff the chicken with various raw vegetables, and roast it at 400F for two hours.

Fragrant and tasty.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Yeah, but the problem is that Erasmus stuffs his chicken before he kills it.
Posted by: Arden Chatfield on Feb. 22 2009,19:55

Quote (carlsonjok @ Feb. 22 2009,17:54)
Quote (Erasmus @ FCD,Feb. 22 2009,19:43)
next weekend i'll be looking for an army of delicate purple noses poking up
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Okay, this is without a doubt, the gayest thing I have ever read on AtBC.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


You mean aside from Louis's 4,415 posts, right?

Hey, Erasmus is bravely sharing his feminine side with us, and for that I think he should be commended.
Posted by: carlsonjok on Feb. 22 2009,19:59

Quote (Arden Chatfield @ Feb. 22 2009,19:55)
Quote (carlsonjok @ Feb. 22 2009,17:54)
 
Quote (Erasmus @ FCD,Feb. 22 2009,19:43)
next weekend i'll be looking for an army of delicate purple noses poking up
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Okay, this is without a doubt, the gayest thing I have ever read on AtBC.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


You mean aside from Louis's 4,415 posts, right?

Hey, Erasmus is bravely sharing his feminine side with us, and for that I think he should be commended.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


I had a slightly different picture in my mind


Posted by: carlsonjok on Feb. 22 2009,20:01

FWIW, I made pork filets with caper sauce tonight and am now going to kick back with a glass or three of Miramont Estates Eclipse California Red and type up some more notes from my evening with the Discovery Institute.
Posted by: khan on Feb. 22 2009,20:29

Today I roasted some turkey legs on a bed of onions/celery/mushrooms and deglazed the pan with a bit of red wine.
Posted by: Erasmus, FCD on Feb. 22 2009,20:37

Quote (carlsonjok @ Feb. 22 2009,19:54)
Quote (Erasmus @ FCD,Feb. 22 2009,19:43)
next weekend i'll be looking for an army of delicate purple noses poking up
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Okay, this is without a doubt, the gayest thing I have ever read on AtBC.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


if carlson had shared that it would have been 'using my nose to find an army of purple throbbers to delicately stick in'.  if the stuck in were stuck out, he'd look like a porcupine, etc.

you know what just fits in a chicken?

heheh
Posted by: carlsonjok on Feb. 22 2009,21:45

Quote (Erasmus, FCD @ Feb. 22 2009,20:37)
Quote (carlsonjok @ Feb. 22 2009,19:54)
Quote (Erasmus @ FCD,Feb. 22 2009,19:43)
next weekend i'll be looking for an army of delicate purple noses poking up
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Okay, this is without a doubt, the gayest thing I have ever read on AtBC.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


if carlson had shared that it would have been 'using my nose to find an army of purple throbbers to delicately stick in'.  if the stuck in were stuck out, he'd look like a porcupine, etc.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Dude, your not even making sense. Put down the pipe, go grab yourself a Mountain Dew, and chill out.
Posted by: Arden Chatfield on Feb. 23 2009,15:34

Quote (Erasmus @ FCD,Feb. 22 2009,18:37)
if carlson had shared that it would have been 'using my nose to find an army of purple throbbers to delicately stick in'.  if the stuck in were stuck out, he'd look like a porcupine, etc.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------



Posted by: Erasmus, FCD on Feb. 24 2009,11:48

need i expand the old saw?  not sure it's a good idea.

if carlson had as many purple throbbers sticking out of him as had been... well... anyway he would look like a purple throbbing porcupine.

I speakeds it, muthafuckah.
Posted by: rhmc on Mar. 17 2009,20:34

Quote (rhmc @ Jan. 06 2009,21:06)
we cook corned beef by boiling it with a bag of zatarain's crab boil.  
cool it, slice it thin.  
rye bread, swiss cheese, sauerkraut.

mmmmm.  rueben's for days.  :)

stock up at st. paddy's day.  they freeze well.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


seeing as how it's saint paddy's day once again in savannah...

and it was a zoo downtown today.  

a very attractive one as well....
Posted by: khan on Mar. 24 2009,19:30

Does anyone else just love bean thread noodles mixed with almost anything?
Posted by: carlsonjok on Mar. 28 2009,14:11

It is cold out, there is basketball on the TV, so it is time to do some cooking.

< Cincinnati Chili > - Four way

And a Breckenridge Pale Ale to wash it down
Posted by: J-Dog on Mar. 28 2009,14:15

Quote (carlsonjok @ Mar. 28 2009,14:11)
It is cold out, there is basketball on the TV, so it is time to do some cooking.

< Cincinnati Chili > - Four way

And a Breckenridge Pale Ale to wash it down
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Boo Yah!  I HAVE 7 OF 8 TEAMS STILL IN in one pool, and 5 of 8 in my other pool.   Fax me over some of that chili!
Posted by: khan on Mar. 28 2009,16:22

Presently roasting turkey legs on a bed of onions; have to smell it for an hour or so before eating.
Posted by: RupertG on Mar. 28 2009,16:41

If you get the chance, try some Brewdog beer. I spent a happy few hours in Edinburgh's Blue Blazer pub last night (which has a good claim to being one of the finest boozers on the planet), and among my explorations I sampled (repeatedly) Paradox - a 10 percent dark beer matured in old whisky casks. Spectacular. It was on tap, but they only sold it in half pint measures.

< http://www.brewdog.com/paradox.php >

R
Posted by: J-Dog on Mar. 28 2009,19:42

Quote (RupertG @ Mar. 28 2009,16:41)
If you get the chance, try some Brewdog beer. I spent a happy few hours in Edinburgh's Blue Blazer pub last night (which has a good claim to being one of the finest boozers on the planet), and among my explorations I sampled (repeatedly) Paradox - a 10 percent dark beer matured in old whisky casks. Spectacular. It was on tap, but they only sold it in half pint measures.

< http://www.brewdog.com/paradox.php >

R
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


How was it with your deep-fried Mars Bar?  :)
Posted by: RupertG on Mar. 28 2009,20:18

Quote (J-Dog @ Mar. 28 2009,19:42)
Quote (RupertG @ Mar. 28 2009,16:41)
If you get the chance, try some Brewdog beer. I spent a happy few hours in Edinburgh's Blue Blazer pub last night (which has a good claim to being one of the finest boozers on the planet), and among my explorations I sampled (repeatedly) Paradox - a 10 percent dark beer matured in old whisky casks. Spectacular. It was on tap, but they only sold it in half pint measures.

< http://www.brewdog.com/paradox.php >

R
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


How was it with your deep-fried Mars Bar?  :)
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Deep-fried Mars Bars are so last year. It's the deep-fried kebab now.

R
Posted by: keiths on Mar. 28 2009,20:47

Quote (RupertG @ Mar. 28 2009,18:18)
 
Quote (J-Dog @ Mar. 28 2009,19:42)
 
Quote (RupertG @ Mar. 28 2009,16:41)
If you get the chance, try some Brewdog beer. I spent a happy few hours in Edinburgh's Blue Blazer pub last night (which has a good claim to being one of the finest boozers on the planet), and among my explorations I sampled (repeatedly) Paradox - a 10 percent dark beer matured in old whisky casks. Spectacular. It was on tap, but they only sold it in half pint measures.

< http://www.brewdog.com/paradox.php >

R
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


How was it with your deep-fried Mars Bar?  :)
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Deep-fried Mars Bars are so last year. It's the deep-fried kebab now.

R
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Nah, it's the < deep-fried Pepsi >.
Posted by: J-Dog on Mar. 28 2009,21:48

Quote (RupertG @ Mar. 28 2009,20:18)
Quote (J-Dog @ Mar. 28 2009,19:42)
Quote (RupertG @ Mar. 28 2009,16:41)
If you get the chance, try some Brewdog beer. I spent a happy few hours in Edinburgh's Blue Blazer pub last night (which has a good claim to being one of the finest boozers on the planet), and among my explorations I sampled (repeatedly) Paradox - a 10 percent dark beer matured in old whisky casks. Spectacular. It was on tap, but they only sold it in half pint measures.

< http://www.brewdog.com/paradox.php >

R
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


How was it with your deep-fried Mars Bar?  :)
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Deep-fried Mars Bars are so last year. It's the deep-fried kebab now.

R
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


I'm thinkin' that just about anything would go good with your Paradox from the Blue Blazer ... but my daughter preferred hanging out at the Rush Bar when she went there last Fall.
Posted by: khan on April 06 2009,17:57

I made a weird salad*:
A bag of greens ( baby romaine, tango, radicchio)
Pouch of tuna
Soba boiled w/ olive oil, oregano, garlic
Drained can of diced tomatoes
Sliced fresh mushrooms
Soy sauce, balsamic vinegar, touch of EVOO

It's very good!

*those are the only salad ingredients I had in the house

I tend toward 'stream of consciousness' cooking.
Posted by: Erasmus, FCD on April 06 2009,18:45

Quote (khan @ April 06 2009,17:57)
I made a weird salad*:
A bag of greens ( baby romaine, tango, radicchio)
Pouch of tuna
Soba boiled w/ olive oil, oregano, garlic
Drained can of diced tomatoes
Sliced fresh mushrooms
Soy sauce, balsamic vinegar, touch of EVOO

It's very good!

*those are the only salad ingredients I had in the house

I tend toward 'stream of consciousness' cooking.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


hey khan the poke  is up.  also young turkey mustards and rumex shoots.  it is defintely salad time.

i'll be dining on some tonight, along with the morels we found yesterday.  and some fresh wild asparagus from the road side.

yayyyyy spring!!!!!!!eleven!!!!
Posted by: khan on April 06 2009,18:48

Quote (Erasmus, FCD @ April 06 2009,19:45)
Quote (khan @ April 06 2009,17:57)
I made a weird salad*:
A bag of greens ( baby romaine, tango, radicchio)
Pouch of tuna
Soba boiled w/ olive oil, oregano, garlic
Drained can of diced tomatoes
Sliced fresh mushrooms
Soy sauce, balsamic vinegar, touch of EVOO

It's very good!

*those are the only salad ingredients I had in the house

I tend toward 'stream of consciousness' cooking.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


hey khan the poke  is up.  also young turkey mustards and rumex shoots.  it is defintely salad time.

i'll be dining on some tonight, along with the morels we found yesterday.  and some fresh wild asparagus from the road side.

yayyyyy spring!!!!!!!eleven!!!!
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


"This is the dawning of the age of asparagus."
Posted by: dvunkannon on April 08 2009,15:22

4 cups of wine, matzah, roasted eggs, horseradish, bananas dipped in salt water - I chose my religion by looking at the menu!

Happy Passover, y'all!
Posted by: Erasmus, FCD on April 11 2009,20:28

is anyone else wearin the morels out or is it just me?
Posted by: Rev. BigDumbChimp on April 12 2009,00:05

Whiskey and lots of it
Posted by: Albatrossity2 on April 12 2009,07:18

Quote (Erasmus, FCD @ April 11 2009,20:28)
is anyone else wearin the morels out or is it just me?
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Morels are not up yet around here. I've seen none in my ambles through the woods, and the turkey hunters that I know have not seen any either.

We've had plenty of rain recently, but no warm nights. If the forecasts hold I will start looking about the middle of this next week, and I'll report back. If we get a couple of 50-degree nights, I suspect that it will be a great morel season this year!
Posted by: Albatrossity2 on April 17 2009,18:15

First batch of the season, along with some found Yellow-shafted Flicker feathers for scale. Note that most of these are the gray morels (Morchella deliciosa, with only a few yellow morels (M. esculenta. That means it is early in the season, even though it is mid-April. Rain and mild temps are predicted for the weekend, so there should be a lot more where these came from!


Posted by: Richardthughes on April 17 2009,20:46

Quote (Albatrossity2 @ April 17 2009,18:15)
First batch of the season, along with some found Yellow-shafted Flicker feathers for scale. Note that most of these are the gray morels (Morchella deliciosa, with only a few yellow morels (M. esculenta. That means it is early in the season, even though it is mid-April. Rain and mild temps are predicted for the weekend, so there should be a lot more where these came from!


---------------------QUOTE-------------------


I have some in my sneakers I can send you, Alby.
Posted by: Erasmus, FCD on April 17 2009,21:12

Quote (Albatrossity2 @ April 17 2009,18:15)
First batch of the season, along with some found Yellow-shafted Flicker feathers for scale. Note that most of these are the gray morels (Morchella deliciosa, with only a few yellow morels (M. esculenta. That means it is early in the season, even though it is mid-April. Rain and mild temps are predicted for the weekend, so there should be a lot more where these came from!


---------------------QUOTE-------------------


oooh yaller hammers.  that beats a sack of may fries.  you can sell those for 5 bucks a piece in churrkee

fungus among us!  and youns too.  i am excited for you.

we found 81 today.  I think that puts the season at 450 exactly.  it has been good to us.  one day was gigantic yellows, most of them have been greys.  lots of half-frees earlier.  the first batch were the blacks but i only found them once.   looking forward to getting out and finding some more tomorrow.

morels and wild asparagus and poke salad we have been eating good.  

today i met a dude with tattooed ears.  he came strolling through  my mushroom patch.  what does tattooed ears mean?  i figured it was a prison gang but hell anyone you meet dry land fishing in those woods is probably a pretty good hand.  he talked my damn ear off while my littlun ran around picking up fishies.  good times.
Posted by: Albatrossity2 on April 18 2009,14:41

Quote (Richardthughes @ April 17 2009,20:46)
I have some in my sneakers I can send you, Alby.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Those would be your toes, Richard.

Maybe you should get them looked at...
Posted by: Richardthughes on April 18 2009,21:10

Quote (Albatrossity2 @ April 18 2009,14:41)
Quote (Richardthughes @ April 17 2009,20:46)
I have some in my sneakers I can send you, Alby.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Those would be your toes, Richard.

Maybe you should get them looked at...
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


I will, I "can sell those for 5 bucks a piece in churrkee"!
Posted by: Erasmus, FCD on April 19 2009,09:57

no the feathers are what you can sell for five bucks a piece in churrkee.  or alternatively you might trade them for a left handed cigarette and a sliced baloney white bread mayonnaise homemade mater sammich up at the grocery.

the fish are something else altogether.
Posted by: Albatrossity2 on April 26 2009,12:12

We're about in the peak period for morels here. If we get the predicted rain tonight, there should be a good crop tomorrow as well!

Here's the haul from this morning's expedition.


Posted by: khan on April 26 2009,12:14

Quote (Albatrossity2 @ April 26 2009,13:12)
We're about in the peak period for morels here. If we get the predicted rain tonight, there should be a good crop tomorrow as well!

Here's the haul from this morning's expedition.


---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Food porn.

How do you prepare them?
Posted by: Albatrossity2 on April 26 2009,12:29

Quote (khan @ April 26 2009,12:14)
Food porn.

How do you prepare them?
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Mostly we dehydrate them and use them in various recipes throughout the year. Here's what we're cooking tonight; a favorite recipe from Food and Wine mag.


---------------------QUOTE-------------------
   Rich, creamy Port and mushroom sauce makes these chicken breasts special. A little more work than a weekday meal, but worth it. Great served with plain rice or simply flavored risotto (lemon or parmesan) to soak up the flavors.

   6 servings;1 hour 25 minutes 1 hr prep

   3/4     cup chicken broth
   1     ounce dried wild mushrooms, thoroughly rinsed under running water,and drained (such as cepes, morels, etc, all one kind or a mix)
   1/2     lb fresh cultivated mushrooms, wiped clean with damp paper towel (button)
   5     tablespoons unsalted butter
   1/4     cup finely-chopped shallots (or 3 green onions, finely-chopped, plus 1 T minced garlic)
       salt and pepper, to taste
   1/3     cup medium port wine
   1/3     cup heavy cream
   6     boneless skinless chicken breast halves

      1. In a small saucepan, bring broth to a boil; pour over the wild mushrooms in a small bowl and let stand for about 2 hours.
      2. Thinly slice cleaned mushroom caps, discarding stems.
      3. In a skillet over medium to medium-to-low heat, melt butter and gently saute shallots or onion/garlic mixture for about 5 minutes (do not brown).
      4. Drain liquid from wild mushrooms and reserve.
      5. Finely chop the wild mushrooms and add them and the fresh mushrooms to the skillet with the shallots (or onion/garlic mixture) and saute over medium heat, stirring occasionally, for about 7- 10 minutes.
      6. Preheat oven to 325 degrees Fahrenheit.
      7. Add the reserved mushroom liquid, Port, and cream to the skillet and simmer for about 5 minutes, or until slightly thickened.
      8. Pour mushroom mixture into a shallow baking dish and arrange chicken breast halves in a single layer on top of the mushrooms.
      9. Sprinkle chicken with salt and pepper and cover the dish tightly with aluminum foil.
     10. Bake in the middle level of the oven for about 25- 30 minutes, until chicken is done.

---------------------QUOTE-------------------


And tomorrow night I may try < this recipe >, which I just found this year. Looks good!
Posted by: KCdgw on April 26 2009,12:36

Its a humid, windy Spring day here in Kansas City... waiting for the tornadoes. Enjoying a nice ice-cold bottle of Zagorka, from Bulgaria:



Perfect.

KC
Posted by: khan on April 29 2009,11:39

The asparagus has arrived at the farmers' market.  For lunch I will saute it in some ghee.
Posted by: khan on July 25 2009,17:58

Went back to my peasant roots.

Noticed a cow tongue in the freezer at the farmers' market.

Put it in the Crock Pot overnight w/ dry beans and many vegetables and herbs.

Smelled and tasted wonderful.
Posted by: rhmc on July 25 2009,19:43

do you "skin" the tongue?  

i've a grocers nearby that has cow tongue every now and again but the recipe i've seen starts with "skinning the tongue".
Posted by: khan on July 25 2009,20:16

Quote (rhmc @ July 25 2009,20:43)
do you "skin" the tongue?  

i've a grocers nearby that has cow tongue every now and again but the recipe i've seen starts with "skinning the tongue".
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


I skin it after cooking, save it for stock.
Posted by: Erasmus, FCD on July 26 2009,08:42

tongue skin before bung skin, i suppose
Posted by: carlsonjok on Aug. 11 2009,22:33

Hey, Tarden Chatterbox?

< Bacon!!!1!1111!!! >
Posted by: ppb on Aug. 12 2009,07:36

Quote (carlsonjok @ Aug. 11 2009,23:33)
Hey, Tarden Chatterbox?

< Bacon!!!1!1111!!! >
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Wow.  There's even something < that appeals to the ID supporters! >
Posted by: rhmc on Aug. 16 2009,19:39

south georgia caviar = okra

that particular flavor of hibiscus has bloomed here and is providing pods a plenty.

plants are approaching 8 feet tall - yes, 8 feet - and we're beginning to share pods with the neighbors as we cannot eat it all.

fried okra, microwaved with basil, grilled, eaten raw, boiled, warmed with tomatoes....

mmmm.  

those big white seeds....
Posted by: Erasmus, FCD on Aug. 16 2009,19:45

when i was a-comin' on we used to eat so much boiled okry that i couldn't keep my socks pulled up.  ahh jerry
Posted by: Richardthughes on Sep. 11 2009,23:15

Just won:

12 x Macallan 12 years 750 ml
12 x Remy Martin VSOP 750 ml
12 x Remy Martin 1738 750 ml

at a charity auction. Where's Steve Story when you need him?
Posted by: J-Dog on Sep. 12 2009,07:53

W00t!  Party at Richard's...

Be sure to take pictures of all the experimentation, and please make sure that no squirrels or sweaters are harmed.
Posted by: Alan Fox on Feb. 18 2010,12:00

I see some of my adopted compatriots managed to sell rather a lot of red bicyclettes to a Mr Gallo.

< faux pinot >
Posted by: Richardthughes on Feb. 18 2010,12:24

Joy will soon be telling us that the Prohibition was just a government plot to circumvent the Treaty of Madrid and the Treaty of Versailles...
Posted by: Dr.GH on Feb. 18 2010,21:32

Have any of you found the simple joy (not the nit-wit Joy) of Spanish olives in Jalipano flavored brine nibbled between sips of a good Scotch?

I can strongly recommend. The salt, burn, and bite are perfect.
Posted by: Amadan on Mar. 30 2010,09:39

< Further comment would be superfluous. >
Posted by: Louis on Mar. 30 2010,10:17

Quote (Amadan @ Mar. 30 2010,14:39)
< Further comment would be superfluous. >
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


{sniff}

Sometimes the world is so beautiful I just want to cry.

Louis
Posted by: FrankH on Mar. 30 2010,11:01

Quote (Louis @ Mar. 30 2010,10:17)
Quote (Amadan @ Mar. 30 2010,14:39)
< Further comment would be superfluous. >
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


{sniff}

Sometimes the world is so beautiful I just want to cry.

Louis
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


After I go in for a checkup with the doctor next week, I plan to get lit up as I've been a good boy.  No alcohol, fried food, easy on deserts, back running (back up to 10k at least twice a week), etc.  Yes, life really sucks.  (On another topic, does exercise, eating right really make one live longer or does it just feel that way?0

So I ask the good gent from Wales.  I like the dark stouts and porters.  I also enjoy a good ale, not IPAs though.

What are some of the best you think are out there that I might be able to procure in the US?
Posted by: Louis on Mar. 30 2010,12:03

Quote (FrankH @ Mar. 30 2010,16:01)
Quote (Louis @ Mar. 30 2010,10:17)
Quote (Amadan @ Mar. 30 2010,14:39)
< Further comment would be superfluous. >
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


{sniff}

Sometimes the world is so beautiful I just want to cry.

Louis
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


After I go in for a checkup with the doctor next week, I plan to get lit up as I've been a good boy.  No alcohol, fried food, easy on deserts, back running (back up to 10k at least twice a week), etc.  Yes, life really sucks.  (On another topic, does exercise, eating right really make one live longer or does it just feel that way?0

So I ask the good gent from Wales.  I like the dark stouts and porters.  I also enjoy a good ale, not IPAs though.

What are some of the best you think are out there that I might be able to procure in the US?
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Good? No.

Gent? Only with a supporting cast of thousands and a strong tailwind.

From Wales? {Faints with rage}

Guinness. It travels reasonably well, it is reasonably good and very consistent. If you can even get a Mackeson's try that. IMO avoid Murphy's like the plague.

As for ales, well I shall be banished from CAMRA for even thinking it, but some of the American microbrew ales I've tried are not hideously insipid donkey piss. So your domestic market might be an option.

As for English stuff, if you can get anything from the Badger brewery (they seem to have a wide distribution) then give it a go, Golden Champion for a preference. Personally, I love Ringwood beers, but the chances of you getting them in the US are minimal (I haven't checked so could be wrong). If you find anything from Bateman's brewery buy all of it and store it in a fortified camp, then spend the next however long drinking it in a slightly surly way.

However, after a quick search online I found this:

< http://www.beerliquors.com/beer/britishbeer.htm >

It's a starting point. Boddingtons is piss, avoid. Ditto Murphys and Newcastle Brown. The former is syrupy crap, the latter is a fighting brew you should only drink if you intend violence. Old Speckled Hen should only be drunk from a bottle in an emergency.

The Fullers, Melbourne Bros, Samuel Smiths or Tranquair ales all seem good. Fullers is a decent brewery, the ESB is a nice beer IMO. This place also sells Guinness, unfortunately only the extra stout, which is a bit more real than most people can handle, and isn't the "draught" with which most people are familiar.

They also have a decent selection of European beers. Chimay is a personal fave. Try the Lindemans Lambic beer, it ages like wine and is a real unique joy. If you're feeling adventurous try the wheat beer Hoegaarden (pronounced: "chchcHOOchchcHARTen", with the "ch" being the one from "loch" not "cheese").

Dammit, I want a beer now.

Louis
Posted by: Robin on Mar. 30 2010,12:06

Making me thirsty here...


Posted by: Robin on Mar. 30 2010,12:11

Quote (Louis @ Mar. 30 2010,12:03)

---------------------QUOTE-------------------




---------------------QUOTE-------------------
Old Speckled Hen should only be drunk from a bottle in an emergency.


Louis
---------------------QUOTE-------------------



Fortunately we have a lovely little "pub" here near me that gets it on tap. I quite enjoy, and would right now more so...
Posted by: Louis on Mar. 30 2010,12:16

Quote (Robin @ Mar. 30 2010,17:11)
[quote=Louis,Mar. 30 2010,12:03][/quote]


---------------------QUOTE-------------------
Old Speckled Hen should only be drunk from a bottle in an emergency.


Louis
---------------------QUOTE-------------------



Fortunately we have a lovely little "pub" here near me that gets it on tap. I quite enjoy, and would right now more so...
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Draught is ok. Bottles always seem to me, and de gustibus non est disputandum, to be lack a certain something.

Louis
Posted by: Robin on Mar. 30 2010,12:29

Quote (Louis @ Mar. 30 2010,12:16)

---------------------QUOTE-------------------




---------------------QUOTE-------------------
Quote (Robin @ Mar. 30 2010,17:11)
Quote (Louis @ Mar. 30 2010,12:03)

---------------------QUOTE-------------------


 

---------------------QUOTE-------------------
Old Speckled Hen should only be drunk from a bottle in an emergency.


Louis
---------------------QUOTE-------------------



Fortunately we have a lovely little "pub" here near me that gets it on tap. I quite enjoy, and would right now more so...
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Draught is ok. Bottles always seem to me, and de gustibus non est disputandum, to be lack a certain something.

Louis
---------------------QUOTE-------------------



I agree.

I have always wondered about the chemistry in this. Why are kegs and casks so much better for beer (it seems) than bottling? Is it volume related? Do they have to use a slightly different recipe for bottling?  Never quite understood that.
Posted by: FrankH on Mar. 30 2010,13:29

Quote (Robin @ Mar. 30 2010,12:29)
[quote=Louis,Mar. 30 2010,12:16][/quote]


---------------------QUOTE-------------------
Quote (Robin @ Mar. 30 2010,17:11)
Quote (Louis @ Mar. 30 2010,12:03)

---------------------QUOTE-------------------


 

---------------------QUOTE-------------------
Old Speckled Hen should only be drunk from a bottle in an emergency.


Louis
---------------------QUOTE-------------------



Fortunately we have a lovely little "pub" here near me that gets it on tap. I quite enjoy, and would right now more so...
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Draught is ok. Bottles always seem to me, and de gustibus non est disputandum, to be lack a certain something.

Louis
---------------------QUOTE-------------------



I agree.

I have always wondered about the chemistry in this. Why are kegs and casks so much better for beer (it seems) than bottling? Is it volume related? Do they have to use a slightly different recipe for bottling?  Never quite understood that.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


None of the above.  Just stinking to non-metric units:

Barrel = 55 gallons (OBTW, how many litres in a barrel)

Bottle = 12 oz.

You know that you can drink far more than one bottle but even in two or three sittings, the barrel might be a bit much.
Posted by: Louis on Mar. 30 2010,13:30

For kegs I'm going to go with vanillin. Anything in wood is going to have more vanillin and similar wood products in it, and thus be a much more "rounded" flavour.

If we ignore contributions to flavour from the "packaging" beer in presurised kegs (metal)/unpressurised casks (wood) will have advantages over bottled beer in (at least) three ways:

1) It is in the dark and therefore unlikely to be lightstruck. If memory serves the Hen bottles are clear glass and thus offer little protection from (UV) light. Also IIRC Hen is a "bitter" bitter, thus has lots of lovely isohumulones to turn into skunky thiols.

2) Aeration and oxygen. The method by which these things are poured aerates them, perhaps allowing for some oxidation of various compounds (not checked the GC profiles of various beers, so cannot comment accurately) and certainly for the formation of bubbles. Everyone knows bubbles make thing taste good! Taste a beer poured through a sparkler as opposed to a flat, open nozzle. It makes a difference.

3) Freshness. The turnaround of keg beer is usually pretty damn fast. Bottles can linger longer.

I have no idea about different recipes for bottles vs kegs, but the above are sufficient to produce big changes in taste.

HTH

Louis
Posted by: J-Dog on Mar. 30 2010,13:59

Quote (Louis @ Mar. 30 2010,13:30)
2) Aeration and oxygen. The method by which these things are poured aerates them, perhaps allowing for some oxidation of various compounds (not checked the GC profiles of various beers, so cannot comment accurately) and certainly for the formation of bubbles. Everyone knows bubbles make thing taste good!   Taste a beer poured through a sparkler as opposed to a flat, open nozzle. It makes a difference.



HTH

Louis
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Louis - Is something like this what you are suggesting?  I know it works great for wines.... never considered using for beer.

Posted by: Robin on Mar. 30 2010,14:18

Quote (Louis @ Mar. 30 2010,13:30)

---------------------QUOTE-------------------




---------------------QUOTE-------------------
For kegs I'm going to go with vanillin. Anything in wood is going to have more vanillin and similar wood products in it, and thus be a much more "rounded" flavour.

If we ignore contributions to flavour from the "packaging" beer in presurised kegs (metal)/unpressurised casks (wood) will have advantages over bottled beer in (at least) three ways:

1) It is in the dark and therefore unlikely to be lightstruck. If memory serves the Hen bottles are clear glass and thus offer little protection from (UV) light. Also IIRC Hen is a "bitter" bitter, thus has lots of lovely isohumulones to turn into skunky thiols.

2) Aeration and oxygen. The method by which these things are poured aerates them, perhaps allowing for some oxidation of various compounds (not checked the GC profiles of various beers, so cannot comment accurately) and certainly for the formation of bubbles. Everyone knows bubbles make thing taste good! Taste a beer poured through a sparkler as opposed to a flat, open nozzle. It makes a difference.

3) Freshness. The turnaround of keg beer is usually pretty damn fast. Bottles can linger longer.

I have no idea about different recipes for bottles vs kegs, but the above are sufficient to produce big changes in taste.

HTH

Louis
---------------------QUOTE-------------------



Ahhhh! Much abliged! That all makes sense. Now I really want a draught!
Posted by: Louis on Mar. 30 2010,14:24

Quote (J-Dog @ Mar. 30 2010,18:59)
Quote (Louis @ Mar. 30 2010,13:30)
2) Aeration and oxygen. The method by which these things are poured aerates them, perhaps allowing for some oxidation of various compounds (not checked the GC profiles of various beers, so cannot comment accurately) and certainly for the formation of bubbles. Everyone knows bubbles make thing taste good!   Taste a beer poured through a sparkler as opposed to a flat, open nozzle. It makes a difference.



HTH

Louis
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Louis - Is something like this what you are suggesting?  I know it works great for wines.... never considered using for beer.

[snimage]
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Not quite, this < wiki > article explains everything.

The sparkler goes on the bottom of your beer pipe on a hand pull keg set up (beer engine).

Principle's about the same though.

Louis
Posted by: J-Dog on Mar. 30 2010,14:32

Louis - Hmmm... I read your link - thanks - but it refers primarily to beer engines, and accessing the beer from a keg.   At home, I am stuck with drinking bottled beer, even though I prefer to pour it into a glass, and I think that my wine aerator may improve the taste of bottled beer.  

I do believe that this calls for some observation and serious experimentation...

edited for sp
Posted by: Louis on Mar. 30 2010,14:44

Quote (J-Dog @ Mar. 30 2010,19:32)
Louis - Hmmm... I read your link - thanks - but it refers primarily to beer engines, and accessing the beer from a keg.   At home, I am stuck with drinking bottled beer, even though I prefer to pour it into a glass, and I think that my wine aerator may improve the taste of bottled beer.  

I do believe that this calls for some observation and serious experimentation...

edited for sp
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


I always advocate experimenting with beer.

Louis
Posted by: ReligionProf on April 01 2010,12:52

http://exploringourmatrix.blogspot.com/2010.......ut Down >

(an attemt at April Fool's Day humor, which seemed just barely appropriate under the "comestibles" heading)
Posted by: J-Dog on April 01 2010,14:10

Quote (ReligionProf @ April 01 2010,12:52)
<a href="http://exploringourmatrix.blogspot.com/2010/04/creationist-restaurant-shut-down.html< Creationist" target="_blank">http://exploringourmatrix.blogspot.com/2010.......ut Down >

(an attemt at April Fool's Day humor, which seemed just barely appropriate under the "comestibles" heading)
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


I liked it! :)
Posted by: Robin on April 01 2010,14:15

Quote (ReligionProf @ April 01 2010,12:52)

---------------------QUOTE-------------------




---------------------QUOTE-------------------
<a href="http://exploringourmatrix.blogspot.com/2010/04/creationist-restaurant-shut-down.html< Creationist" target="_blank">http://exploringourmatrix.blogspot.com/2010.......ut Down >

(an attemt at April Fool's Day humor, which seemed just barely appropriate under the "comestibles" heading)
---------------------QUOTE-------------------



That's a goody! Thanks for the chuckle!
Posted by: Dr.GH on April 01 2010,22:39

No foolin' I have been so pleased with the "Real Tesoro" Cream Sherry I have bought at Trader Joe's for the last 3 or 4 years that I tried their cheapest Whisky (Trader Joe's Blended Scotch, $9.95 per liter). For many years I have only tasted rather expensive single malt Scotch, a 20 Y.O. The Macallan being rather memorable.

Not at all bad with Jalapeno Chiles, green olives and peanuts. It made an interesting mix with the sherry as well. (Older "The Macallan" has been aged in sherry casks that evokes a number of images- oak forest to grape vineyard, to Spanish solara, to Scot Highlands). Recreated with a weak palate, cheap whisky and a splash of equally cheap sherry.  I would really enjoy some blind tastings.

So, if DrDr Dipshit ever wants to pay off cheap, I'll settle.


Posted by: Amadan on May 07 2010,04:01

Some Distinctly Different Delicacies:

< Spiegel Food Quiz >
Posted by: midwifetoad on May 07 2010,12:48

Quote (Amadan @ May 07 2010,04:01)
Some Distinctly Different Delicacies:

< Spiegel Food Quiz >
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


The quiz is easier if you assume the least disgusting choice is the one they made up.
Posted by: Dr.GH on July 09 2010,00:45

I must recommend a most delightful Scotch Whisky, The Balvenie.

That I have been drinking it from 150 year old crystal merely added panache.

Earlier today, I had a vegetable sushi of cucumber, carrot, and avocado with a sashimi fresh albacore. Tomorrow, I'll have some smoked albacore, raw green onion, sautéed garlic + red pepper, on a hard roll, with Heineken beer.  

Life is good.


Posted by: Schroedinger's Dog on July 09 2010,03:45

Sounds like yummi!

I just spent 2 weeks in Belgium, and let me tell you: their gastronomy is quite awefull.

I'm flying to Basingstoke on tuesday, and I will make the most of my girlfriend's kitchen.

I guess my first choice will be a nice roasted lamb shoulder with flageolets. And a Merlot to help it down...
Posted by: Robin on July 09 2010,08:27

Quote (Dr.GH @ July 09 2010,00:45)

---------------------QUOTE-------------------




---------------------QUOTE-------------------
I must recommend a most delightful Scotch Whisky, The Balvenie.

---------------------QUOTE-------------------



I will toss in a recommendation for Deanston. Just a nice Scotch. Very drinkable.
Posted by: Robin on July 09 2010,08:39

Quote (Schroedinger's Dog @ July 09 2010,03:45)

---------------------QUOTE-------------------




---------------------QUOTE-------------------

I just spent 2 weeks in Belgium, and let me tell you: their gastronomy is quite awefull.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------



Really? I spent about 5 days in Hasselt (not exactly THE cultural center of Europe) and had some splendid meals - in a little pre-war hotel no less. They hotel house wine was a marvelous deuxieme cru from Graves - simply stunning from my perspective. This from the Flemish no less. Granted this a bit ago, so maybe things have changed.

Of particular interest, after some fantastic rack of lamb for me to wash down some luscious bisque and some Cornish hens my boss devoured, the waiter came out with a big grin and even bigger bowl of 'pomme frites' thinking, I suppose, that we 'Mericans needed some instruction on what actual fries are all about. They were completely unparalleled - nothing like anything one can get here in America.  

Perhaps that was a fluke?
Posted by: Dr.GH on July 09 2010,10:06

I was fishing ~150 nm southwest of San Diego California earlier this week. I brought home 2 albacore ~10 lbs each, and 2 ~20 lbs. About 30 lbs of meat. The trip cost ~$400. Market price for albacore is $14 / lb, so I beat the market.

So, this week we have had albacore sashimi, grilled, and smoked. Yesterday I fished for bass in the kelp beds. The boat was rather crowded with 39 passengers but I managed 5 bass over 12 inches. Very nice seared in olive oil with just salt and pepper.
Posted by: fnxtr on July 09 2010,12:52

Hot cocoa with Maker's Mark.  That's all I have to say.
Posted by: Richardthughes on July 09 2010,13:03

Quote (Robin @ July 09 2010,08:27)
[quote=Dr.GH,July 09 2010,00:45][/quote]


---------------------QUOTE-------------------
I must recommend a most delightful Scotch Whisky, The Balvenie.

---------------------QUOTE-------------------



I will toss in a recommendation for Deanston. Just a nice Scotch. Very drinkable.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Bowmore, Ye Speyside Pansies.

< http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bowmore_Distillery >
Posted by: Schroedinger's Dog on July 09 2010,13:11

Jameson is still my favorite!

I tried the "gold" edition in Belgium, and I have to say it is nothing out of the ordinary, especialy for 45 pounds a bottle (or 8 Euros for a 4cl shot).

I'll stick to the regular stuff..
Posted by: Robin on July 09 2010,14:14

You all be makin' me bloody thirsty!
Posted by: J-Dog on July 23 2010,09:55

FYI...



---------------------QUOTE-------------------
You'd expect a lot from a bottle of beer costing $765. What you get is 55 percent alcohol — and served in a squirrel.

According to Scottish firm BrewDog, "The End of History" is the "strongest, most expensive and most shocking beer in the world."

---------------------QUOTE-------------------



< The End of History Beer >



I want one several
Posted by: fnxtr on July 23 2010,10:17

Quote (J-Dog @ July 23 2010,07:55)
FYI...

 

---------------------QUOTE-------------------
You'd expect a lot from a bottle of beer costing $765. What you get is 55 percent alcohol — and served in a squirrel.

According to Scottish firm BrewDog, "The End of History" is the "strongest, most expensive and most shocking beer in the world."

---------------------QUOTE-------------------



< The End of History Beer >



I want one several
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Grey squirrel or red squirrel?

Either way, that's just ghoulish.
Posted by: J-Dog on July 25 2010,11:32

Quote (fnxtr @ July 23 2010,10:17)
Grey squirrel or red squirrel?

Either way, that's just ghoulish.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


We should wait until Ras checks in.  I'm sure he knows the fat content, cholesteral and sodium for red and gray.
Posted by: J-Dog on Aug. 11 2010,18:19

This just in... read the comments for LOLs

< French Chef Found Frozen >
Posted by: khan on Aug. 21 2010,15:53

I rarely drink beer. A friend suggested Yuengling (it is not sold in Ohio).

Any suggestions for a good dark beer?
Posted by: Schroedinger's Dog on Aug. 21 2010,16:57

Quote (J-Dog @ Aug. 12 2010,00:19)
This just in... read the comments for LOLs

< French Chef Found Frozen >
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


French chefs don't unfreeze that well. I would advise a steady watering (room temperature, if it's not a morgue) for about 4 hours. Then stuff, add garlic, and off you go!
Posted by: Wesley R. Elsberry on Aug. 21 2010,17:48

Quote (khan @ Aug. 21 2010,15:53)
I rarely drink beer. A friend suggested Yuengling (it is not sold in Ohio).

Any suggestions for a good dark beer?
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Spaten Optimator, especially if you can find it on draft. Try a German restaurant.
Posted by: carlsonjok on Aug. 21 2010,17:58

Quote (khan @ Aug. 21 2010,15:53)
I rarely drink beer. A friend suggested Yuengling (it is not sold in Ohio).

Any suggestions for a good dark beer?
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


I would have suggested going to < The Anderson's > general store and just asking in their beer and wine section, but it doesn't appear that they have a location near you.  Since you aren't a beer drinker, I'd suggest finding a microbrewed Milk Stout or Nut Brown Ale. The ale isn't super dark, but is darker than your typical American mass-market beer.  Both styles are lighter on the hops and heavier on the malt, which will be smoother on the palette for a newbie.
Posted by: Tracy P. Hamilton on Aug. 21 2010,23:30

Quote (khan @ Aug. 21 2010,15:53)
I rarely drink beer. A friend suggested Yuengling (it is not sold in Ohio).

Any suggestions for a good dark beer?
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


You could drink Yuengling every day, and still claim you rarely drank beer.

I don't know your taste, but try a double chocolate stout by Brooklyn or Youngs, if you like the flavor of chocolate.
Posted by: dvunkannon on Sep. 06 2010,05:40

Quote (Robin @ July 09 2010,09:27)
[quote=Dr.GH,July 09 2010,00:45][/quote]


---------------------QUOTE-------------------
I must recommend a most delightful Scotch Whisky, The Balvenie.

---------------------QUOTE-------------------



I will toss in a recommendation for Deanston. Just a nice Scotch. Very drinkable.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


I bought a bottle of Teh Balvenie for my son's bar mitzvah (it being 12 yrs seemed somehow relevant). It is now twice as old (as is my son) while half the bottle is still there. Says more about my utter teetotalingness than about the taste. Does the taste of Scotch change/improve in the bottle?

Nevertheless, on a flight back from Crete yesterday, British Airways inflight shopping convinced me to buy a bottle of Penderyn Welsh Whiskey. The Penderyn distillery seems to have a number of distinctions:

- only Welsh distillery now operating
- only distillery in the UK with a female master distillerologist (whatever they call it)
- smallest distillery in the world

My sons are eager to help me do the taste test vs. the Balvenie.

ps - I was in Crete for my second honeymoon (in three months). We stayed at www.amirandes.com which was spectacular and low priced in USD. I asked the waiter in the authentic Cretan restaurant to choose the wine that was made closest to the hotel, and got a wonderful white from the village of Dafni.
Posted by: Schroedinger's Dog on Sep. 08 2010,08:05

While in Poland, my girlfriend's father bought me a bottle of < D?bowa >, Polish Oak Vodka.

I wanted to keep it for my return to Nice, but since I'm stuck here in Basingstoke until Saturday because of a strike from the French Air traffic Control, I decided to have a taste.

Well, I used to think ?ubrówka was the best Polish vodka, but I stand corrected. D?bowa is tasty, really smooth, and doesn't give a headache.

I should have bought more!
Posted by: khan on Sep. 08 2010,08:11

This past weekend I drank coffee and I drank beer. Will not do so again for a long time.

Back to morning tea and evening wine.
Posted by: Kattarina98 on Sep. 09 2010,05:13

Quote (khan @ Sep. 08 2010,08:11)
This past weekend I drank coffee and I drank beer. Will not do so again for a long time.

Back to morning tea and evening wine.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


I've always thought that a monument should be erected to honour the first growers of Camellia sinensis.
Posted by: Bing on Sep. 09 2010,13:50

Quote (Dr.GH @ July 09 2010,00:45)
I must recommend a most delightful Scotch Whisky, The Balvenie.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


current contents of my whisky cupboard.  Not included are duplicates ( I have some doubles), cooking whisky, flask-in-the-sporran whisky (Johnny Walker, etc.) Irish whiskeys (4) or Canadian rye whiskeys (2).



Lagavulin 16 yo
Scapa 14 yo
Poit Dhubh
McLellands Islay
Glenfiddich 12 yo
Glenfiddich Special Reserve 12 yo
Glenfiddich Caoran Reserve 12 yo



Cragganmore 12 yo
The Macallan Fine Oak 15 yo
The Macallan Select Oak
The Macallan Elegancia 12 yo
Ancnoc 12 yo
Highland Park 15 yo
Té Bheag
Glenfiddich 15 yo
Dalwhinnie 15 yo

When a cherished bottle dies it is replaced by something new, hence the absence of The Balvenie, Oban, GlenRothes, Glen Morangie, etc.
Posted by: Robin on Sep. 09 2010,13:55

Quote (Bing @ Sep. 09 2010,13:50)

---------------------QUOTE-------------------




---------------------QUOTE-------------------
Quote (Dr.GH @ July 09 2010,00:45)
I must recommend a most delightful Scotch Whisky, The Balvenie.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


current contents of my whisky cupboard.  Not included are duplicates ( I have some doubles), cooking whisky, flask-in-the-sporran whisky (Johnny Walker, etc.) Irish whiskeys (4) or Canadian rye whiskeys (2).



Lagavulin 16 yo
Scapa 14 yo
Poit Dhubh
McLellands Islay
Glenfiddich 12 yo
Glenfiddich Special Reserve 12 yo
Glenfiddich Caoran Reserve 12 yo



Cragganmore 12 yo
The Macallan Fine Oak 15 yo
The Macallan Select Oak
The Macallan Elegancia 12 yo
Ancnoc 12 yo
Highland Park 15 yo
Té Bheag
Glenfiddich 15 yo
Dalwhinnie 15 yo

When a cherished bottle dies it is replaced by something new, hence the absence of The Balvenie, Oban, GlenRothes, Glen Morangie, etc.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------



Lordy! So when are we all invited to a tasting?



:D
Posted by: khan on Sep. 09 2010,13:59

Quote (Bing @ Sep. 09 2010,14:50)
Quote (Dr.GH @ July 09 2010,00:45)
I must recommend a most delightful Scotch Whisky, The Balvenie.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


current contents of my whisky cupboard.  Not included are duplicates ( I have some doubles), cooking whisky, flask-in-the-sporran whisky (Johnny Walker, etc.) Irish whiskeys (4) or Canadian rye whiskeys (2).



Lagavulin 16 yo
Scapa 14 yo
Poit Dhubh
McLellands Islay
Glenfiddich 12 yo
Glenfiddich Special Reserve 12 yo
Glenfiddich Caoran Reserve 12 yo



Cragganmore 12 yo
The Macallan Fine Oak 15 yo
The Macallan Select Oak
The Macallan Elegancia 12 yo
Ancnoc 12 yo
Highland Park 15 yo
Té Bheag
Glenfiddich 15 yo
Dalwhinnie 15 yo

When a cherished bottle dies it is replaced by something new, hence the absence of The Balvenie, Oban, GlenRothes, Glen Morangie, etc.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


I think your collection might be worth more than the house; certainly more than the car.
Posted by: DaveH on Sep. 09 2010,15:03

Quote (khan @ Sep. 09 2010,13:59)
Quote (Bing @ Sep. 09 2010,14:50)
Quote (Dr.GH @ July 09 2010,00:45)
I must recommend a most delightful Scotch Whisky, The Balvenie.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


current contents of my whisky cupboard.  Not included are duplicates ( I have some doubles), cooking whisky, flask-in-the-sporran whisky (Johnny Walker, etc.) Irish whiskeys (4) or Canadian rye whiskeys (2).


Lagavulin 16 yo
Scapa 14 yo
Poit Dhubh
McLellands Islay
Glenfiddich 12 yo
Glenfiddich Special Reserve 12 yo
Glenfiddich Caoran Reserve 12 yo



Cragganmore 12 yo
The Macallan Fine Oak 15 yo
The Macallan Select Oak
The Macallan Elegancia 12 yo
Ancnoc 12 yo
Highland Park 15 yo
Té Bheag
Glenfiddich 15 yo
Dalwhinnie 15 yo

When a cherished bottle dies it is replaced by something new, hence the absence of The Balvenie, Oban, GlenRothes, Glen Morangie, etc.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


I think your collection might be worth more than the house; certainly more than the car.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


If anyone comes to Edinburgh/Leith and is curious/serious about whisky (without an "e"!) I'd be more than happy to take them < here > (*sound of heavenly choirs*)
Just leave a message on this thread.
Posted by: Kattarina98 on Sep. 09 2010,15:25

Last month, I was in *Oban*, and this is what I had as foundation for the whisky:



And just to broaden your < education >:

And I'll be in Edinburgh soon ... just saying ...
Posted by: Schroedinger's Dog on Sep. 09 2010,16:23

Quote (Kattarina98 @ Sep. 09 2010,21:25)
Last month, I was in *Oban*, and this is what I had as foundation for the whisky:



And just to broaden your < education >:

And I'll be in Edinburgh soon ... just saying ...
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Haggis!!!

The bestest whole meal everest!!!*







*No, seriously, I love Haggis.
Posted by: Bing on Sep. 09 2010,16:56

Quote (DaveH @ Sep. 09 2010,15:03)
If anyone comes to Edinburgh/Leith and is curious/serious about whisky (without an "e"!) I'd be more than happy to take them < here > (*sound of heavenly choirs*)
Just leave a message on this thread.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


For the North Americans, especially Ontarians and visitors from the nearby USA (NY, MI, OH) I'd recommend < The Dam Pub in Thornbury, ON >.  When I was there in July they had 513 varieties in stock.
Posted by: fnxtr on Sep. 10 2010,01:42

Quote (Schroedinger's Dog @ Sep. 09 2010,14:23)
Quote (Kattarina98 @ Sep. 09 2010,21:25)
Last month, I was in *Oban*, and this is what I had as foundation for the whisky:



And just to broaden your < education >:

And I'll be in Edinburgh soon ... just saying ...
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Haggis!!!

The bestest whole meal everest!!!*







*No, seriously, I love Haggis.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


I haven't had good haggis yet. Must be difficult to get the right oatmeal/Alpo ratio.
Posted by: Kattarina98 on Sep. 10 2010,05:03

Quote (fnxtr @ Sep. 10 2010,01:42)
I haven't had good haggis yet. Must be difficult to get the right oatmeal/Alpo ratio.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


You need to take Alpo Prime Cuts instead of Classic Chunky.
And it is really delicious, you city slickers - quite as good as the French "Innards in White Wine" and the Bavarian "Lung Hash".
Posted by: dvunkannon on Sep. 10 2010,06:04

Quote (Kattarina98 @ Sep. 10 2010,06:03)
Quote (fnxtr @ Sep. 10 2010,01:42)
I haven't had good haggis yet. Must be difficult to get the right oatmeal/Alpo ratio.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


You need to take Alpo Prime Cuts instead of Classic Chunky.
And it is really delicious, you city slickers - quite as good as the French "Innards in White Wine" and the Bavarian "Lung Hash".
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


What tripe.
Posted by: Robin on Sep. 10 2010,08:42

Quote (Schroedinger's Dog @ Sep. 09 2010,16:23)

---------------------QUOTE-------------------




---------------------QUOTE-------------------
Haggis!!!

The bestest whole meal everest!!!*







*No, seriously, I love Haggis.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------



Egads! You can't be serious!

Personally I can't stomach it. (no pun and all that)

Tried it with several pints of Guinness and even that didn't help. I did eat the turnips, potatoes, and carrots though, so I suppose all in all I had a decent meal.
Posted by: dvunkannon on Sep. 10 2010,11:03

Quote (Robin @ Sep. 10 2010,09:42)
[quote=Schroedinger's Dog,Sep. 09 2010,16:23][/quote]


---------------------QUOTE-------------------
Haggis!!!

The bestest whole meal everest!!!*







*No, seriously, I love Haggis.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------



Egads! You can't be serious!

Personally I can't stomach it. (no pun and all that)

Tried it with several pints of Guinness and even that didn't help. I did eat the turnips, potatoes, and carrots though, so I suppose all in all I had a decent meal.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


And you had several pints of Guiness!
Posted by: Robin on Sep. 10 2010,11:42

Quote (dvunkannon @ Sep. 10 2010,11:03)
 
Quote (Robin @ Sep. 10 2010,09:42)
 
Quote (Schroedinger's Dog @ Sep. 09 2010,16:23)

---------------------QUOTE-------------------


   

---------------------QUOTE-------------------
Haggis!!!

The bestest whole meal everest!!!*







*No, seriously, I love Haggis.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------



Egads! You can't be serious!

Personally I can't stomach it. (no pun and all that)

Tried it with several pints of Guinness and even that didn't help. I did eat the turnips, potatoes, and carrots though, so I suppose all in all I had a decent meal.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


And you had several pints of Guiness!
---------------------QUOTE-------------------



Yep! As I said, it was a decent meal - good liquid bread and plenty of tasty veggies - the sheep's porridge-n-sheep's stomach notwithstanding.


Oh, and 'round these parts we spell the stout's name with two 'n's. Stop ogling at yer bride's figure and look it up.   :D
Posted by: dvunkannon on Sep. 10 2010,21:02

Quote (Robin @ Sep. 10 2010,12:42)
Quote (dvunkannon @ Sep. 10 2010,11:03)
 
Quote (Robin @ Sep. 10 2010,09:42)
   
Quote (Schroedinger's Dog @ Sep. 09 2010,16:23)

---------------------QUOTE-------------------


     

---------------------QUOTE-------------------
Haggis!!!

The bestest whole meal everest!!!*







*No, seriously, I love Haggis.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------



Egads! You can't be serious!

Personally I can't stomach it. (no pun and all that)

Tried it with several pints of Guinness and even that didn't help. I did eat the turnips, potatoes, and carrots though, so I suppose all in all I had a decent meal.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


And you had several pints of Guiness!
---------------------QUOTE-------------------



Yep! As I said, it was a decent meal - good liquid bread and plenty of tasty veggies - the sheep's porridge-n-sheep's stomach notwithstanding.


Oh, and 'round these parts we spell the stout's name with two 'n's. Stop ogling at yer bride's figure and look it up.   :D
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


WTF! Robin's intertubez x-ray vision is working! How'd you know I was oogling my bride's figure? A figure so delectable as to stop traffic and be considered a hazard to navigation...

I mean...

dang...

what were we talking about?
Posted by: carlsonjok on Sep. 10 2010,21:19

Quote (dvunkannon @ Sep. 10 2010,21:02)
WTF! Robin's intertubez x-ray vision is working! How'd you know I was oogling my bride's figure? A figure so delectable as to stop traffic and be considered a hazard to navigation...
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


She really takes a good picture, too.


Posted by: carlsonjok on Sep. 11 2010,16:38

I am back from the < local Oktoberfest celebration >.

I had the following:

< Hacker-Pschorr Oktoberfest >
< Coop Oktoberfest >
< Spaten Optimator >
< Ayinger Celebrator Doppelbock >

I had some food, too. But who cares about that?


Posted by: Kattarina98 on Sep. 12 2010,03:25

Quote (carlsonjok @ Sep. 11 2010,16:38)
I am back from the < local Oktoberfest celebration >.

I had the following:

< Hacker-Pschorr Oktoberfest >
< Coop Oktoberfest >
< Spaten Optimator >
< Ayinger Celebrator Doppelbock >

I had some food, too. But who cares about that?
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


A good selection of very strong stuff. Which one did you like best, the Ayinger?
At the Oktoberfest here in Munich, they will charge around 10 Euro for one "Mass" =2 pints of beer which is why I shall boycott the beer tents this year.
This could get < serious >.
Posted by: Robin on Oct. 04 2010,16:23

[quote=carlsonjok,Sep. 11 2010,16:38][/quote]
 

---------------------QUOTE-------------------
I am back from the < local Oktoberfest celebration >.

I had the following:

< Hacker-Pschorr Oktoberfest >
< Coop Oktoberfest >
< Spaten Optimator >
< Ayinger Celebrator Doppelbock >

I had some food, too. But who cares about that?

---------------------QUOTE-------------------



Hit a couple of the local Oktoberfests here in Virginia over the past couple of weeks. I've now tried the following:

< Spaten Oktoberfest >

< Hofbrau Oktober >

I really liked (loved) the Spaten; the Hofbrau left me thinking I'd gotten an American substitute. It wasn't bad, just didn't seem to have the character. Still, it was draught and went fine with the food.

I also had < Dominion Octoberfest >, which I thought for a small(ish) American brew was darn good.

Cheers to October!
Posted by: Tracy P. Hamilton on Oct. 04 2010,21:12

Quote (Robin @ Oct. 04 2010,16:23)
Quote (carlsonjok @ Sep. 11 2010,16:38)

---------------------QUOTE-------------------


   

---------------------QUOTE-------------------
I am back from the < local Oktoberfest celebration >.

I had the following:

< Hacker-Pschorr Oktoberfest >
< Coop Oktoberfest >
< Spaten Optimator >
< Ayinger Celebrator Doppelbock >

I had some food, too. But who cares about that?

---------------------QUOTE-------------------



Hit a couple of the local Oktoberfests here in Virginia over the past couple of weeks. I've now tried the following:

< Spaten Oktoberfest >

< Hofbrau Oktober >

I really liked (loved) the Spaten; the Hofbrau left me thinking I'd gotten an American substitute. It wasn't bad, just didn't seem to have the character. Still, it was draught and went fine with the food.

I also had < Dominion Octoberfest >, which I thought for a small(ish) American brew was darn good.

Cheers to October!
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


You need a real American Oktoberfest, such as Left Hand's or Flying Dogtoberfest.

By the way...

Posted by: Robin on Oct. 05 2010,08:49

Quote (Tracy P. Hamilton @ Oct. 04 2010,21:12)
Quote (Robin @ Oct. 04 2010,16:23)
 
Quote (carlsonjok @ Sep. 11 2010,16:38)

---------------------QUOTE-------------------


     

---------------------QUOTE-------------------
I am back from the < local Oktoberfest celebration >.

I had the following:

< Hacker-Pschorr Oktoberfest >
< Coop Oktoberfest >
< Spaten Optimator >
< Ayinger Celebrator Doppelbock >

I had some food, too. But who cares about that?

---------------------QUOTE-------------------



Hit a couple of the local Oktoberfests here in Virginia over the past couple of weeks. I've now tried the following:

< Spaten Oktoberfest >

< Hofbrau Oktober >

I really liked (loved) the Spaten; the Hofbrau left me thinking I'd gotten an American substitute. It wasn't bad, just didn't seem to have the character. Still, it was draught and went fine with the food.

I also had < Dominion Octoberfest >, which I thought for a small(ish) American brew was darn good.

Cheers to October!
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


You need a real American Oktoberfest, such as Left Hand's or Flying Dogtoberfest.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------



Mmm...sounds yum! I had the Sam Adams Oktoberfest once - not bad, but a bit heavy imo. I want to try the Leinenkugel's, but alas I don't know anywhere around here in VA that has it on tap.



---------------------QUOTE-------------------

By the way...

---------------------QUOTE-------------------



Ahhh...pretzels...om nom nom nom nom...
Posted by: OgreMkV on Nov. 03 2010,22:21

Chocolate Ba