Printable Version of Topic

-Antievolution.org Discussion Board
+--Forum: After the Bar Closes...
+---Topic: Book on Time for Laymen started by cogzoid


Posted by: cogzoid on Oct. 17 2006,16:03

A while back, I remember seeing a review on Panda's Thumb for a book on how scientists measure time.  Apparently it discussed everything from day to day clocks to geologic timescales.  It was aimed at laymen.

I forgot the name, and tried to search for the book on PT, but "time" is a rather common word.  It's not on PZ Myers'  < book list >, either.

Anybody vaguely remember what I'm talking about?

I was hoping to give it to my mother, so she can stop thinking the world is only 6,000 years old.  Or at least, she'd understand why scientists think the way they do.
Posted by: Stephen Elliott on Oct. 17 2006,19:25

I just finished reading < this. > I doubt it is the one you are after but it covers the same subject.

The core of the book is about how astronomers proceeded to measure the age of the Universe.

However it starts with a brief overview of why biology and geology went to demand an ancient Earth.

Then covers the physics version of aging the sun and solar system.

Then the main subject of trying to date the Universe and the slightly embarrassing period where the most up to date science of the time had the oldest stars being dated as older than the age of the Universe they inhabit.

Probably not the one you wanted, but the subject does cover your requiremnt.
Posted by: Altabin on Oct. 17 2006,21:25

Quote (cogzoid @ Oct. 17 2006,21:03)
A while back, I remember seeing a review on Panda's Thumb for a book on how scientists measure time.  Apparently it discussed everything from day to day clocks to geologic timescales.  It was aimed at laymen.

I forgot the name, and tried to search for the book on PT, but "time" is a rather common word.  It's not on PZ Myers'  < book list >, either.

Anybody vaguely remember what I'm talking about?
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


I think you mean < this book >, Bones, Rocks and Stars by Chris Turney.  I haven't read it, but it's been on my reading list since PZM recommended it.
Posted by: Jay Ray on Oct. 18 2006,01:12

It could be this one.

< Time (Its origin, its enigma, its history) >, byAlexander Waugh.

Really good read. Funny and rife with info.
Posted by: deadman_932 on Oct. 18 2006,07:33

I finished "Bones, Rocks and Stars" a while ago, and it's pretty good. Here's some online stuff that might be useful, for a starter: < http://www.primitivism.com/time.htm >
Posted by: cogzoid on Oct. 18 2006,08:01

Bones, Rocks, and Stars.  That's it.  Thanks alot guys.  I knew the forum would pull through for me.
Posted by: BWE on Oct. 23 2006,05:22

< This could do it too. >
end


Powered by Ikonboard 3.0.2a
Ikonboard © 2001 Jarvis Entertainment Group, Inc.