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Question: Updated: What's Your Educational Background? :: Total Votes:192
Poll choices Votes Statistics
PhD Science 59  [30.73%]
PhD Humanities 7  [3.65%]
BS/BA/Ma Science 80  [41.67%]
BS/BA/Ma Humanities 27  [14.06%]
High School 13  [6.77%]
Lots of Scientific American 2  [1.04%]
I Done Readed a Lot on the Internets 4  [2.08%]
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Pages: (5) < 1 2 3 [4] 5 >   
  Topic: Updated: What's Your Educational Background?, Take Two< Next Oldest | Next Newest >  
dnmlthr



Posts: 565
Joined: Mar. 2008

(Permalink) Posted: Mar. 24 2008,13:36   

Undergrad, CS. Black belt in smack talk.

--------------
Guess what? I don't give a flying f*ck how "science works" - Ftk

  
Amadan



Posts: 1261
Joined: Jan. 2007

(Permalink) Posted: Mar. 24 2008,14:32   

Quote (Ra-Úl @ Mar. 24 2008,12:30)
 
Quote (Amadan @ Mar. 24 2008,07:44)
Lesson: How to clear a (virtual) room quickly:

1. Bachelor of Civil Law
2. Solicitor, Republic of Ireland
3. Solicitor, England and Wales


Hello? Is there anyone . . .

Oh never mind.

What is a BCL? I'm not familiar with British jurisprudence and Law studies, and what I do know is based on reading way too much Dickens, in Spanish translation, as a 12 year old. I see you are a solicitor; what kind of practice do you have? As a solicitor, do you deal with criminal matters? And what do solicitors drink?

Ra-Ul

The 'Civil' refers neither to manner (lawyers have no need of them) nor to Napoleonic legal systems. It just points out that the degree course is centred mainly on non-criminal law.

I no longer practise law, but before I got better I used to practise commercial law, specialising in European Union law and Competition. I never did any criminal work.

--------------
"People are always looking for natural selection to generate random mutations" - Densye  4-4-2011
JoeG BTW dumbass- some variations help ensure reproductive fitness so they cannot be random wrt it.

   
Amadan



Posts: 1261
Joined: Jan. 2007

(Permalink) Posted: Mar. 24 2008,14:33   

Solicitors drink whatever you can afford.

--------------
"People are always looking for natural selection to generate random mutations" - Densye  4-4-2011
JoeG BTW dumbass- some variations help ensure reproductive fitness so they cannot be random wrt it.

   
J-Dog



Posts: 4368
Joined: Dec. 2006

(Permalink) Posted: Mar. 24 2008,15:05   

Quote (Amadan @ Mar. 24 2008,14:32)
I never did any criminal work.

Ah, too bad.  I think the producers of Expelled might be able to use your services soon.

--------------
Come on Tough Guy, do the little dance of ID impotence you do so well. - Louis to Joe G 2/10

Gullibility is not a virtue - Quidam on Dembski's belief in the Bible Code Faith Healers & ID 7/08

UD is an Unnatural Douchemagnet. - richardthughes 7/11

  
Assassinator



Posts: 479
Joined: Nov. 2007

(Permalink) Posted: Mar. 24 2008,15:17   

Finished high school last year, busy atm with a Bachelor in Bio-Informatics although it's not sure I'm finishing that (I found out I hate programming). Maybe I'll quite and start a Bachelor in journalism, still talking/working with my study-councelor.

  
J-Dog



Posts: 4368
Joined: Dec. 2006

(Permalink) Posted: Mar. 24 2008,15:31   

Quote (Assassinator @ Mar. 24 2008,15:17)
Finished high school last year, busy atm with a Bachelor in Bio-Informatics although it's not sure I'm finishing that (I found out I hate programming). Maybe I'll quite and start a Bachelor in journalism, still talking/working with my study-councelor.

You could look majoring in Pompous Windbag and Clueless Douche - Bill O'Reilly and Rush Limbaugh won't be around forever, you know.

--------------
Come on Tough Guy, do the little dance of ID impotence you do so well. - Louis to Joe G 2/10

Gullibility is not a virtue - Quidam on Dembski's belief in the Bible Code Faith Healers & ID 7/08

UD is an Unnatural Douchemagnet. - richardthughes 7/11

  
Assassinator



Posts: 479
Joined: Nov. 2007

(Permalink) Posted: Mar. 24 2008,15:38   

Well at least I got O'Reilly's book Learning Python (but I've never heard from Rush Limbaugh), and I'll keep that (not like most students who stop after 1 year and sell there books on Ebay). So even if a certain interest in programming would return, I can pick it up with some help from friends and books. I just don't think that Bio-Informatics is my "thing", shame though but you can't really expect a 17 year old to immediatly know what he wants to do for the rest of his life.

PS: I'm not really sure if I should feel slightly insulted by that post J-Dog ;)

  
Louis



Posts: 6436
Joined: Jan. 2006

(Permalink) Posted: Mar. 24 2008,16:13   

Quote (Ra-Úl @ Mar. 24 2008,18:30)
{SNIP}

And what do solicitors drink?

Ra-Ul

Advocaat.

Louis

(Hat Tip to the Late Great Alan Coren)

--------------
Bye.

  
Louis



Posts: 6436
Joined: Jan. 2006

(Permalink) Posted: Mar. 24 2008,16:14   

My sister in law goes to Uni next year and is thinking of reading Bio-Engineering.

So if anyone wants their cat welded...

Louis

P.S. Well *I* thought it was a good joke.

--------------
Bye.

  
J-Dog



Posts: 4368
Joined: Dec. 2006

(Permalink) Posted: Mar. 24 2008,17:17   

Quote (Assassinator @ Mar. 24 2008,15:38)
Well at least I got O'Reilly's book Learning Python (but I've never heard from Rush Limbaugh), and I'll keep that (not like most students who stop after 1 year and sell there books on Ebay). So even if a certain interest in programming would return, I can pick it up with some help from friends and books. I just don't think that Bio-Informatics is my "thing", shame though but you can't really expect a 17 year old to immediatly know what he wants to do for the rest of his life.

PS: I'm not really sure if I should feel slightly insulted by that post J-Dog ;)

No Don't feel insulted!  I was insulting BillO and Rush, but actually you're right they ARE too easy targets... Now I think I am insulted.  If I keep on insulting myself and shooting myself in the foot, I will have to go over to the DarkSide at uD!

--------------
Come on Tough Guy, do the little dance of ID impotence you do so well. - Louis to Joe G 2/10

Gullibility is not a virtue - Quidam on Dembski's belief in the Bible Code Faith Healers & ID 7/08

UD is an Unnatural Douchemagnet. - richardthughes 7/11

  
mcstew



Posts: 2
Joined: Mar. 2008

(Permalink) Posted: Mar. 24 2008,20:24   

Quote (Assassinator @ Mar. 24 2008,15:38)
Well at least I got O'Reilly's book Learning Python (but I've never heard from Rush Limbaugh), and I'll keep that (not like most students who stop after 1 year and sell there books on Ebay). So even if a certain interest in programming would return, I can pick it up with some help from friends and books. I just don't think that Bio-Informatics is my "thing", shame though but you can't really expect a 17 year old to immediatly know what he wants to do for the rest of his life.

PS: I'm not really sure if I should feel slightly insulted by that post J-Dog ;)

I'm in first year medical science after trying commerce (almost lasted 45 minutes of the first lecture before I realized that mistake), Archaeology, Biological science and obtaining CCNP/MCSE/SCP IT certifications. I basically spent 3 years after I left high school looking for my niche and believe me, if you have your doubts now don't delay it, start looking for what suits you. Don't be afraid to shop around is what I'm saying I guess xD

  
dochocson



Posts: 62
Joined: May 2006

(Permalink) Posted: Mar. 24 2008,20:44   

Bachelor of Science, Biology (minor in Political Science)

Doctor of Medicine.

Not sure which poll choice is the best fit.

--------------
All bleeding stops...eventually.

  
EyeNoU



Posts: 115
Joined: Mar. 2008

(Permalink) Posted: Mar. 25 2008,20:06   

I have a high school education, but I am full of BS. Where should I go?  And don't say UD..........

  
Dr.GH



Posts: 1957
Joined: May 2002

(Permalink) Posted: Mar. 25 2008,23:16   

I indulged myself in my first lecture to the first year medical students.  I would begin, “I am Doctor Hurd.  I am a real Doctor.  I have a Ph.D.  I welcome you to your studies here at the Medical College where you will receive the M.D., or Masters of Disease.”

Much booing and hissing ensued.

One of my last lectures to a medical group was titled, "I am a real doctor, but..." which was on the different roles in medical education and research played by scientists and clinicians.

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"Science is the horse that pulls the cart of philosophy."

L. Susskind, 2004 "SMOLIN VS. SUSSKIND: THE ANTHROPIC PRINCIPLE"

   
ERV



Posts: 329
Joined: Sep. 2007

(Permalink) Posted: Mar. 30 2008,21:30   

Quote (Dr.GH @ Mar. 25 2008,23:16)
I indulged myself in my first lecture to the first year medical students.  I would begin, “I am Doctor Hurd.  I am a real Doctor.  I have a Ph.D.  I welcome you to your studies here at the Medical College where you will receive the M.D., or Masters of Disease.”

Much booing and hissing ensued.

One of my last lectures to a medical group was titled, "I am a real doctor, but..." which was on the different roles in medical education and research played by scientists and clinicians.

I think the PhD student vs MD student war has been going on since the beginning of time.

  
Dr.GH



Posts: 1957
Joined: May 2002

(Permalink) Posted: Mar. 30 2008,23:35   

Quote (ERV @ Mar. 30 2008,19:30)
Quote (Dr.GH @ Mar. 25 2008,23:16)
I indulged myself in my first lecture to the first year medical students.  I would begin, “I am Doctor Hurd.  I am a real Doctor.  I have a Ph.D.  I welcome you to your studies here at the Medical College where you will receive the M.D., or Masters of Disease.”

Much booing and hissing ensued.

One of my last lectures to a medical group was titled, "I am a real doctor, but..." which was on the different roles in medical education and research played by scientists and clinicians.

I think the PhD student vs MD student war has been going on since the beginning of time.

And so it shall ever be.  I had a colleague once ask why the Ph.D.s out numbered the MDs at one medical school I taught at.  I said, "Because medical care is too important to leave to MDs."

If you add in all the scientists in the pharma industry and the MPHs running most hospitals, medical doctors are not the top of the medical profession.

This could actually be a major fuck-up caused by the narrowness of the medical school curriculum.  People with the personality and skills to be scientists are not let into medical school anymore.  Small minded linear thinkers good at memorization become MDs.

Edited by Dr.GH on Mar. 30 2008,21:40

--------------
"Science is the horse that pulls the cart of philosophy."

L. Susskind, 2004 "SMOLIN VS. SUSSKIND: THE ANTHROPIC PRINCIPLE"

   
rhmc



Posts: 340
Joined: Dec. 2007

(Permalink) Posted: Mar. 31 2008,19:32   

no choice for us weirdos who have both a ba and a bs.

  
Gary Bohn



Posts: 10
Joined: Mar. 2005

(Permalink) Posted: Mar. 31 2008,22:40   

Quote (rhmc @ Mar. 31 2008,19:32)
no choice for us weirdos who have both a ba and a bs.

I have the same problem.

I found that a Guinness, a small bottle of lotion and an understanding wife fix the problem right up.

  
skeptic



Posts: 1163
Joined: May 2006

(Permalink) Posted: Mar. 31 2008,23:53   

Yes, GH, but the other side of that is most science PhDs have the personalty of stale bread and couldn't carry on a conversation with a patient if they were given a script...present company excluded, of course.

  
BWE



Posts: 1896
Joined: Jan. 2006

(Permalink) Posted: April 01 2008,01:59   

Quote (skeptic @ Mar. 31 2008,23:53)
Yes, GH, but the other side of that is most science PhDs have the personalty of stale bread and couldn't carry on a conversation with a patient if they were given a script...present company excluded, of course.

Have you ever looked at stale bread under a microscope? That's a lively bunch there!

--------------
Who said that ev'ry wish would be heard and answered
When wished on the morning star
Somebody thought of that, and someone believed it
Look what it's done so far

The Daily Wingnut

   
Louis



Posts: 6436
Joined: Jan. 2006

(Permalink) Posted: April 01 2008,04:08   

Quote (skeptic @ April 01 2008,05:53)
Yes, GH, but the other side of that is most science PhDs have the personalty of stale bread and couldn't carry on a conversation with a patient if they were given a script...present company excluded, of course.

There speaks someone who must have simply never met many people with PhDs.

The more obivously loathesome colleagues aside, I have to say that a lot of my similarly qualified colleagues are a good laugh. There's bad apples in every bunch of course, but the majority of them I find to be intelligent, witty, and in many if not most cases quite outgoing and interesting. I've yet to work anywhere where I cannot find a PhD qualified person who I would love to go out for a beer with and can play squash with of an evening. The "geeky scientist" sterotype is wholly inaccurate. Like most successful people, successful scientists generally enjoy the other qualities that go along with it. You certainly cannot rise in the pharma industry (for example) by being some hopeless geek with the social graces of a salted slug.

In fact in my experience chemistry PhDs are bigger party animals than their medical MD colleagues. We drink more and party a lot harder. (I foresee many jokes from the Tarden/Nolarjcoks axis) Probably because of the intense damage already done to our livers by lab work!

As for dealing with patients, big deal, it really isn't that hard. Just remember they are a) individual human beings like you, and b) probably quite scared. Rocket science it ain't, and yes, I have had to do it on occasion (I volunteered in a hospital for some years in my spare time, helping out the medics with drug queries and the like).

I remember FTK's comment about her being a tough blonde girly who could kick our pointdexter asses, or some such drivel. Well, we already knew FTK was an ignorant slattern who buys into every ignorant sterotype going, but it's this sort of thing that makes me laugh whenever I encounter it. It's such an obvious piece of fear based psychological defense: "Oh no he's a scientist, that means he's probably quite bright, oh no that means I might be less bright than him, quick, look for a flaw I can exploit, well that Stephen Hawking's a scientist, he's in a wheelchair and no good at sports, I reckon I could kick his arse, so other scientists must be like that". Or perhaps "Oh no he's a scientist, that means he's probably quite bright, oh no that means I might be less bright than him, quick, look for a flaw I can exploit, well I knew a kid at school who liked science and we used to call him a geek and he had no friends because he was quiet and spoddy, so other scientists must be like that."

My only reply to these stereotype touting bozos is: Yawn, wake me when you are in possession of something resembling a clue.

Louis

P.S. Incidentally, the "war between MDs and PhDs" is dick waving. Funny on occasion, but pointless nonetheless. From a scientific standpoint there are gorss holes in an MD's training, but then MD's aren't scientists, and a lot of people seem to forget that. MD's are trained for a very different job, and one that they do by and large very well. At least here in Europe, which is a civilised part of the world. ;-)

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Bye.

  
Joe M



Posts: 3
Joined: April 2008

(Permalink) Posted: April 01 2008,17:50   

High school only, and I try my best to self-educate with all the problems that entails!

   
EyeNoU



Posts: 115
Joined: Mar. 2008

(Permalink) Posted: April 04 2008,17:17   

I agree wholeheartedly with Louis. The PhDs I have met have for the most part been very likable folk. They were always as much fun at social events as everyone else. I have only a high school education, but throughout my life I have been an avid reader, especially non-fiction. The people with advanced degrees I have met have always been more than willing to explain things I didn't understand if it was in their field of study. There was definitely no shortage of hard partying folk, that's for sure.

  
skeptic



Posts: 1163
Joined: May 2006

(Permalink) Posted: April 07 2008,21:16   

It appears, as usual that Louis and I do not agree.  The unique PhD is one who is both socially adept and possessing of superior communication skills.  These are the ones who succeed and the others are a dime a dozen.  Next time you're at a conference just take a real hard look around and if you don't spot the awkwardness immediately then you're just not being objective.  A good example, look at your own company and examine the senior executives or vps, or whatever you guys call them and count how many PhDs are there.  1 maybe 2 and then look at the caliber of those two compared to the average Organic Chem PhD teaching three classes a week and scraping by on a research budget.  In fact, take that comparison one step further, in my country at least, and look at Congress and count the number of PhDs.  I hope you see what I'm trying to say even though I know we're not going to agree.  But then again how much fun is that?  Who wants to kill two threads in the same month, lol.

  
Erasmus, FCD



Posts: 6349
Joined: June 2007

(Permalink) Posted: April 07 2008,21:27   

haha skeptic



--------------
You're obviously illiterate as hell. Peach, bro.-FtK

Finding something hard to believe based on the evidence, is science.-JoeG

the odds of getting some loathsome taint are low-- Gordon E Mullings Manjack Heights Montserrat

I work on molecular systems with pathway charts and such.-Giggles

  
Dr.GH



Posts: 1957
Joined: May 2002

(Permalink) Posted: April 07 2008,21:29   

A JD, or a DDiv would I suppose go in the humanities category. Actually, the US Congress had a fair number of PhDs and MDs, compared to the general population.  There are far more lawyers, but the business of Congress is the law.  I am not surprised that most Judges are lawyers.

Community Colleges are a great educational bargain that I support wholeheartedly.  They are also full of faculty that washed out of graduate school with a terminal masters degree. They tell themselves they are "better" teachers because they could not survive in research science.  In my student experience, the best researchers make the best teachers.  I had the publications and teaching awards to match my assertion.  I was also sacked from a community college the same year I was named "teacher of the year" and had 11 undergraduates coauthor research papers with me.  Being good is not popular among second rank faculty.

Edited by Dr.GH on April 07 2008,19:34

--------------
"Science is the horse that pulls the cart of philosophy."

L. Susskind, 2004 "SMOLIN VS. SUSSKIND: THE ANTHROPIC PRINCIPLE"

   
Louis



Posts: 6436
Joined: Jan. 2006

(Permalink) Posted: April 08 2008,03:24   

Quote (skeptic @ April 08 2008,03:16)
It appears, as usual that Louis and I do not agree.  The unique PhD is one who is both socially adept and possessing of superior communication skills.  These are the ones who succeed and the others are a dime a dozen.  Next time you're at a conference just take a real hard look around and if you don't spot the awkwardness immediately then you're just not being objective.  A good example, look at your own company and examine the senior executives or vps, or whatever you guys call them and count how many PhDs are there.  1 maybe 2 and then look at the caliber of those two compared to the average Organic Chem PhD teaching three classes a week and scraping by on a research budget.  In fact, take that comparison one step further, in my country at least, and look at Congress and count the number of PhDs.  I hope you see what I'm trying to say even though I know we're not going to agree.  But then again how much fun is that?  Who wants to kill two threads in the same month, lol.

And this seperates PhDs from the rest of humanity just how precisely? Most PEOPLE are socially inept, clueless drones! PhD's just have a title!

There's not much there I disagree with, and I'll confess maybe I'm lucky by virtue of where I did my PhD and postdoc work because I got to work with some incredible people. My industrial experience is also pretty good.

I'm not denying that the socially inept exist (far from it! I've met them too!) but how many NON-PhD people are senior VPs (as if that is the be all and end all of acheivement!) of pharma companies? The Non-PhD category is far far larger than the PhD category and far fewer (as a percentage) make it to the higher management levels. In the companies I've worked for between 100% and 60% of the ultra senior people have had PhDs (not all in chemistry I stress).

Politics and PhDs: we need more of them! Sadly the sort of people who want to do politics are not always the sort of people who do PhDs. That's no criticism of either. We don't have a system in place which values that qualification in politics, i.e. an ambitious young potential politician has no need to do a PhD to get ahead, in fact it could even take time away from other valuable work they can do to further their career. Again, being a politician or a businessperson is hardly the pinnacle of human acheivement in social or actual terms.

Is there a different skill set? Of course! That's no more significant than saying that a butcher has a different skill set from a carpenter, and one person might be more suited for one role rather than t'other. Having a PhD is a) nothing that precludes a person from being socially adept or b) some kind of mark of nebbishness.

Frankly Skeptic I reckon you're just exercising the quite obvious potato field sized chip on your shoulder because you don't have a PhD. I've heard this tune from others before, and I've never heard it from anyone who wasn't a bitter inadequate. The smart people just get on with things and never worry about the qualifications of others. There's an old Texan saying "just because someone's smarter than you, doesn't make it their fault". Has it ever occured that some people don't go into senior management because they are utterly uninterested in being some paper pushing corporate entity? Life in the lab, even at a very senior level, has it's advantages you know. Especially now most companies offer advancement down more than one career track (i.e. management and/or research).

Louis

P.S. Incidentally there IS a (decreasing) glass ceiling in the pharma industry. It seems in some companies you have to have a PhD to be taken seriously regardless of how good you are or not. Personally I find this abominable, and luckily most of the places I've worked don't have this culture. The place I've worked that was the best, perhaps ironically, is Pfizer (admittedly Pfizer UK). They have an eminently egalitarian and meritocratic attitude. Two of my former (very senior) bosses there had come in as graduates, no PhDs, and both were stunningly brilliant. One of them is quite probably the most knowledgable chemist/scientist I've ever met. He was awesomely informed, incredile at recalling detail and nuances of very subtle science, and sharper than a lemon juice soaked razor. Not much of a drinker though! ;-)

--------------
Bye.

  
Louis



Posts: 6436
Joined: Jan. 2006

(Permalink) Posted: April 08 2008,03:29   

Quote (Dr.GH @ April 08 2008,03:29)
[SNIP]

In my student experience, the best researchers make the best teachers.

[SNIP]

I'd agree to an extent. I find the drive to seperate teaching and research in academia to be a bloody stupid one. You don't understand an idea until you've had to explain it to an 18 year old undergrad who is not interested in the subject and highly interested in the girl/boy two feet away from him/her.

The comparatively little teaching/TAing/demonstrating I did at university and the vastly larger amount of mentoring I've done in industry have caused me to have to explain some tricky stuff on occasion. Stuff I thought I knew....until I had to explain it. The number of good ideas (i.e. ideas that worked) for my reserach I have had in the middle of an explanation are huge. In fact I recommend teaching someone about a research topic as a way of generating new ideas.

YMMV

Louis

--------------
Bye.

  
J-Dog



Posts: 4368
Joined: Dec. 2006

(Permalink) Posted: April 08 2008,08:12   

Quote (Louis @ April 08 2008,03:24)
Frankly Skeptic I reckon you're just exercising the quite obvious potato field sized chip on your shoulder because you don't have a PhD. I've heard this tune from others before, and I've never heard it from anyone who wasn't a bitter inadequate. The smart people just get on with things and never worry about the qualifications of others. There's an old Texan saying "just because someone's smarter than you, doesn't make it their fault". Has it ever occured that some people don't go into senior management because they are utterly uninterested in being some paper pushing corporate entity? Life in the lab, even at a very senior level, has it's advantages you know. Especially now most companies offer advancement down more than one career track (i.e. management and/or research).

Louis

Louis!

Are you okay?  A bit under the weather?

You missed a great opportunity for an asterisk:

There's an old Texan saying "just because someone's smarter than you, doesn't make it their fault".*


* Unless you live in Texas on a houseboat, have an IQ of 100+ 120+   250+ and conduct daily experiments on the caloric content of Cheesy Poofs.

--------------
Come on Tough Guy, do the little dance of ID impotence you do so well. - Louis to Joe G 2/10

Gullibility is not a virtue - Quidam on Dembski's belief in the Bible Code Faith Healers & ID 7/08

UD is an Unnatural Douchemagnet. - richardthughes 7/11

  
Louis



Posts: 6436
Joined: Jan. 2006

(Permalink) Posted: April 08 2008,09:00   

Quote (J-Dog @ April 08 2008,14:12)
Quote (Louis @ April 08 2008,03:24)
Frankly Skeptic I reckon you're just exercising the quite obvious potato field sized chip on your shoulder because you don't have a PhD. I've heard this tune from others before, and I've never heard it from anyone who wasn't a bitter inadequate. The smart people just get on with things and never worry about the qualifications of others. There's an old Texan saying "just because someone's smarter than you, doesn't make it their fault". Has it ever occured that some people don't go into senior management because they are utterly uninterested in being some paper pushing corporate entity? Life in the lab, even at a very senior level, has it's advantages you know. Especially now most companies offer advancement down more than one career track (i.e. management and/or research).

Louis

Louis!

Are you okay?  A bit under the weather?

You missed a great opportunity for an asterisk:

There's an old Texan saying "just because someone's smarter than you, doesn't make it their fault".*


* Unless you live in Texas on a houseboat, have an IQ of 100+ 120+   250+ and conduct daily experiments on the caloric content of Cheesy Poofs.

I haven't been myself lately.

But enough about my personal life!

Ancient Chinese Proverb: Man with dick in biscuit tin feels crumby all day

Louis

P.S. Man with hole in pocket feels cocky all day.

P.P.S. I used to think Wanking was a town in China until I discovered Smirnoff (references antique vodka ad in the UK). I also used to think Muffin the Mule was a sex offence until I discovered Smirnoff.

P.P.P.S. I missed an opportunity for a footnote of some description. OH THE HUGE MANATEE!

{hangs head in shame}

I just can't manage a D'Tard style TARD-O-LOGUE, I'm too disappointed in self. Suffice to say it would have involved such diverse elements as: ALL SCIENCE SO FAR, MAN-BREASTS, CLOWN FEAR, ESKIMO WOMEN, MY ENORMOUS ATTRACTIVENESS TO SEX:OPPOSITE, THE FACT THAT I AM AN AUTODILDO WITH AN RPM OF SOMEWHERE TO THE RIGHT HAND SIDE OF 150. I just can't bring myself to do it. Having missed a classic footnotary I must now commit seppuku with a sharpened appendix.

--------------
Bye.

  
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