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  Topic: Wildlife, What's in your back yard?< Next Oldest | Next Newest >  
Albatrossity2



Posts: 2779
Joined: Mar. 2007

(Permalink) Posted: May 07 2012,09:51   

[quote=Robin,May 03 2012,14:34][/quote]
Yeah, Red-headed woodpeckers are tough birds to get up close and personal with. Nice shot!

The second bird is, I believe, a Lesser Yellowlegs (Tringa flavipes) rather than a white-rumped sandpiper, for a couple of reasons. One is the yellow color of the legs; white-rumped should have black legs. Other is season; white-rumps are among the last of the shorebirds to migrate, typically numbers peak in late may around here. Yellowlegs (both grater and lesser) migrate earlier and would be much more likely to be in your regions right now. It is a great shot, but if you are gonna sell it to a magazine, identifying it correctly would be a great idea!

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Flesh of the sky, child of the sky, the mind
Has been obligated from the beginning
To create an ordered universe
As the only possible proof of its own inheritance.
                        - Pattiann Rogers

   
Robin



Posts: 1430
Joined: Sep. 2009

(Permalink) Posted: May 07 2012,10:04   

Quote (Albatrossity2 @ May 07 2012,09:51)
The second bird is, I believe, a Lesser Yellowlegs (Tringa flavipes) rather than a white-rumped sandpiper, for a couple of reasons.

Oh...good eye Alby! Thanks for the correction! That makes much more sense. And thanks for the compliment.

I've got a slightly better photo of the yellowlegs that I'll post tomorrow.

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we IDists rule in design for the flagellum and cilium largely because they do look designed.  Bilbo

The only reason you reject Thor is because, like a cushion, you bear the imprint of the biggest arse that sat on you. Louis

  
Robin



Posts: 1430
Joined: Sep. 2009

(Permalink) Posted: May 09 2012,09:05   

Ok..."tomorrow" became "day after tomorrow", but here's the other shot of the (properly identified -thanks Alby) Lesser Yellowlegs (Tringa flavipes). I like how the reflection in the water came out, though the plant in the foreground is annoying:



--------------
we IDists rule in design for the flagellum and cilium largely because they do look designed.  Bilbo

The only reason you reject Thor is because, like a cushion, you bear the imprint of the biggest arse that sat on you. Louis

  
Freddie



Posts: 366
Joined: Oct. 2009

(Permalink) Posted: May 09 2012,11:28   

Quote (QED @ May 06 2012,17:34)
I usually just lurk here, but photography's been a hobby for 35 years and I know a bit about the technical side.

Focus is always more difficult at the extremes of a long zoom because the depth of field decreases as the focal length increases (with equal apertures). Also, unless it's a "parfocal" lens, the zoom will probably require refocusing when the focal length is changed.

Some cameras do indeed allow for focus micro-adjustments. I've been playing with my new 5Dii, and have been surprised that both my Canon lenses (24-70L f/2.8 & 50 f/1.8) have required adjustment - one back-focuses and one front-focuses slightly. Normally this isn't a big deal, but when you're working with larger apertures and long lenses, it can matter. Some photographers find in time they can adjust the focus slightly in manual mode to compensate, if the body doesn't have micro-adjust. For those fortunate enough to own a 60D or 5D, there is new software called Focal that will calibrate lenses automatically while the camera is tethered to the computer by a USB cable. I'm not shilling for the developer, but he has been very cooperative during the beta trial versions.

Setting the aperture to 16 or higher will certainly give greater depth of field, but be aware that most lenses have a resolution sweet-spot between F/4 and f/11. Bumping the ISO is sometimes a better option, then deal with the increased noise in Lightroom or Photoshop.

As Lou mentions, practice makes the biggest difference in the final result. Knowing your camera and lenses well, using them until they become second nature as you work, and also the post-processing is key, after your artistic sense, of course.

Sorry to butt in - just wanted to add a few hints from an old-timer...

Thanks for this info - I did some playing around at the weekend and found that my 18-55 zoom was easier to manually focus correctly at the larger focal lengths than the 55-250.  

I got mixed results again using the longer lens so I think between your guidance and Lou's much more practice is in order!

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Joe: Most criticisims of ID stem from ignorance and jealousy.
Joe: As for the authors of the books in the Bible, well the OT was authored by Moses and the NT was authored by various people.
Byers: The eskimo would not need hairy hair growth as hair, I say, is for keeping people dry. Not warm.

  
Lou FCD



Posts: 5378
Joined: Jan. 2006

(Permalink) Posted: May 10 2012,15:47   

Quote (QED @ May 06 2012,18:34)
I usually just lurk here, but photography's been a hobby for 35 years and I know a bit about the technical side.

Focus is always more difficult at the extremes of a long zoom because the depth of field decreases as the focal length increases (with equal apertures). Also, unless it's a "parfocal" lens, the zoom will probably require refocusing when the focal length is changed.

Some cameras do indeed allow for focus micro-adjustments. I've been playing with my new 5Dii, and have been surprised that both my Canon lenses (24-70L f/2.8 & 50 f/1.8) have required adjustment - one back-focuses and one front-focuses slightly. Normally this isn't a big deal, but when you're working with larger apertures and long lenses, it can matter. Some photographers find in time they can adjust the focus slightly in manual mode to compensate, if the body doesn't have micro-adjust. For those fortunate enough to own a 60D or 5D, there is new software called Focal that will calibrate lenses automatically while the camera is tethered to the computer by a USB cable. I'm not shilling for the developer, but he has been very cooperative during the beta trial versions.

Setting the aperture to 16 or higher will certainly give greater depth of field, but be aware that most lenses have a resolution sweet-spot between F/4 and f/11. Bumping the ISO is sometimes a better option, then deal with the increased noise in Lightroom or Photoshop.

As Lou mentions, practice makes the biggest difference in the final result. Knowing your camera and lenses well, using them until they become second nature as you work, and also the post-processing is key, after your artistic sense, of course.

Sorry to butt in - just wanted to add a few hints from an old-timer...

Rock on, much appreciated!

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Lou FCD is still in school, so we should only count him as a baby biologist. -carlsonjok -deprecated
I think I might love you. Don't tell Deadman -Wolfhound

Work-friendly photography
NSFW photography

   
Kristine



Posts: 3044
Joined: Sep. 2006

(Permalink) Posted: May 11 2012,15:22   

We like turtles! :)



The other day, I counted 12 in our pond.

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Which came first: the shimmy, or the hip?

AtBC Poet Laureate

"I happen to think that this prerequisite criterion of empirical evidence is itself not empirical." - Clive

"Damn you. This means a trip to the library. Again." -- fnxtr

  
Robin



Posts: 1430
Joined: Sep. 2009

(Permalink) Posted: May 11 2012,15:26   

Quote (Kristine @ May 11 2012,15:22)
We like turtles! :)

Ooo...pretty painted turtles!

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we IDists rule in design for the flagellum and cilium largely because they do look designed.  Bilbo

The only reason you reject Thor is because, like a cushion, you bear the imprint of the biggest arse that sat on you. Louis

  
Henry J



Posts: 4076
Joined: Mar. 2005

(Permalink) Posted: May 11 2012,22:36   

Ah, but who painted them!?!?!!!!!!111!!one!!!

  
Kristine



Posts: 3044
Joined: Sep. 2006

(Permalink) Posted: May 11 2012,23:09   

Quote (Henry J @ May 11 2012,22:36)
Ah, but who painted them!?!?!!!!!!111!!one!!!

Whoever they were, they left tracks!



Okay, name it - Dog ;) coyote, or lynx? We're not sure.

--------------
Which came first: the shimmy, or the hip?

AtBC Poet Laureate

"I happen to think that this prerequisite criterion of empirical evidence is itself not empirical." - Clive

"Damn you. This means a trip to the library. Again." -- fnxtr

  
sledgehammer



Posts: 531
Joined: Sep. 2008

(Permalink) Posted: May 11 2012,23:39   

My dog has five pads, so I suspect felis, rather than canis

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The majority of the stupid is invincible and guaranteed for all time. The terror of their tyranny is alleviated by their lack of consistency. -A. Einstein  (H/T, JAD)
If evolution is true, you could not know that it's true because your brain is nothing but chemicals. ?Think about that. -K. Hovind

  
Lou FCD



Posts: 5378
Joined: Jan. 2006

(Permalink) Posted: May 12 2012,07:30   

The track is a little hard to see, but Imma gonna disagree with the sledgehammer.

Here's why. See the X?

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Lou FCD is still in school, so we should only count him as a baby biologist. -carlsonjok -deprecated
I think I might love you. Don't tell Deadman -Wolfhound

Work-friendly photography
NSFW photography

   
sledgehammer



Posts: 531
Joined: Sep. 2008

(Permalink) Posted: May 12 2012,13:17   

Quote (Lou FCD @ May 12 2012,05:30)
The track is a little hard to see, but Imma gonna disagree with the sledgehammer.

Here's why. See the X?

Great link! I stand happily corrected.

--------------
The majority of the stupid is invincible and guaranteed for all time. The terror of their tyranny is alleviated by their lack of consistency. -A. Einstein  (H/T, JAD)
If evolution is true, you could not know that it's true because your brain is nothing but chemicals. ?Think about that. -K. Hovind

  
Henry J



Posts: 4076
Joined: Mar. 2005

(Permalink) Posted: May 12 2012,18:02   

X marks the Spot?

  
Henry J



Posts: 4076
Joined: Mar. 2005

(Permalink) Posted: May 13 2012,21:03   

Elephant whisperer

  
Dr.GH



Posts: 1956
Joined: May 2002

(Permalink) Posted: May 14 2012,09:49   

Quote (Kristine @ May 11 2012,21:09)
Okay, name it - Dog ;) coyote, or lynx? We're not sure.

Also note there are no claw scuffs. It is a kitty for sure.

   
Lou FCD



Posts: 5378
Joined: Jan. 2006

(Permalink) Posted: May 14 2012,21:31   



--------------
Lou FCD is still in school, so we should only count him as a baby biologist. -carlsonjok -deprecated
I think I might love you. Don't tell Deadman -Wolfhound

Work-friendly photography
NSFW photography

   
Henry J



Posts: 4076
Joined: Mar. 2005

(Permalink) Posted: May 14 2012,22:26   

At the risk of asking a silly question, where is the sewage outlet pipe? ;)

  
Lou FCD



Posts: 5378
Joined: Jan. 2006

(Permalink) Posted: May 15 2012,08:07   

On the end opposite the mouth, duh. :)

--------------
Lou FCD is still in school, so we should only count him as a baby biologist. -carlsonjok -deprecated
I think I might love you. Don't tell Deadman -Wolfhound

Work-friendly photography
NSFW photography

   
Wesley R. Elsberry



Posts: 4502
Joined: May 2002

(Permalink) Posted: May 15 2012,08:14   

Phylum Entoprocta is an exception.

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"You can't teach an old dogma new tricks." - Dorothy Parker

    
Kattarina98



Posts: 1255
Joined: Sep. 2009

(Permalink) Posted: May 15 2012,08:41   

Quote (Lou FCD @ May 14 2012,21:31)

Funny, that's not how I remember the Carnivora cladogram. Aren't there supposed to be a bunch of lines and Latin words?

Edited by Kattarina98 on May 15 2012,08:42

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Barry Arrington is a bitch.

  
Lou FCD



Posts: 5378
Joined: Jan. 2006

(Permalink) Posted: May 15 2012,14:29   

Quote (Kattarina98 @ May 15 2012,09:41)
Quote (Lou FCD @ May 14 2012,21:31)

Funny, that's not how I remember the Carnivora cladogram. Aren't there supposed to be a bunch of lines and Latin words?

I think this is a Creationist strawdogram.

--------------
Lou FCD is still in school, so we should only count him as a baby biologist. -carlsonjok -deprecated
I think I might love you. Don't tell Deadman -Wolfhound

Work-friendly photography
NSFW photography

   
Freddie



Posts: 366
Joined: Oct. 2009

(Permalink) Posted: May 16 2012,14:02   

Ahem.  Back to the real world.  Went out early this morning before work and couldn't move for birds everywhere.  They must have all flown in during the last few days.

I think the advice on focussing is paying off - a much higher percentage of shots came in on focus ... I also set the camera AF to AI Focus, apparently this switches automatically to AI Servo if the subject starts moving, seems to help as well.

Wren - this guy stayed hopping around and posing for several minutes, got a few good shots of him in neutral, happy and angry poses.



Dunnock



I was looking up in the trees when I heard a rustle in the brambles to the side of me and out popped a couple of juvenile Blackcaps.  I hardly needed to zoom for these, they were so close and so snap happy



All in all a good morning, took home a number of shots I was pleased with!

--------------
Joe: Most criticisims of ID stem from ignorance and jealousy.
Joe: As for the authors of the books in the Bible, well the OT was authored by Moses and the NT was authored by various people.
Byers: The eskimo would not need hairy hair growth as hair, I say, is for keeping people dry. Not warm.

  
Lou FCD



Posts: 5378
Joined: Jan. 2006

(Permalink) Posted: May 16 2012,16:23   

Really nice shots, Freddie!

--------------
Lou FCD is still in school, so we should only count him as a baby biologist. -carlsonjok -deprecated
I think I might love you. Don't tell Deadman -Wolfhound

Work-friendly photography
NSFW photography

   
Lou FCD



Posts: 5378
Joined: Jan. 2006

(Permalink) Posted: May 16 2012,16:27   

Quote (Lou FCD @ May 04 2012,09:55)
The Red-headed Woodpecker is one of two birds on my visual life-list that are not on my photographic life-list. (The other is the Ruby-throated Hummingbird.)

And as of this morning, I've added Cooper's Hawk to that list.

--------------
Lou FCD is still in school, so we should only count him as a baby biologist. -carlsonjok -deprecated
I think I might love you. Don't tell Deadman -Wolfhound

Work-friendly photography
NSFW photography

   
dhogaza



Posts: 525
Joined: Feb. 2006

(Permalink) Posted: May 18 2012,17:26   

Off on a vacation/photo trip ... just getting warmed up at Modoc NWR.


  
dhogaza



Posts: 525
Joined: Feb. 2006

(Permalink) Posted: May 18 2012,17:38   

one more crane from this morning ...

(edited) if you're not familiar with cranes, they build floating nests (rafts) out of vegetation, so this is a mom incubating eggs, somewhat safe from coyotes and other ground predators.


  
dhogaza



Posts: 525
Joined: Feb. 2006

(Permalink) Posted: May 18 2012,22:37   

Maybe I'll get back in the groove after all (it's been two years since I've lugged out the 600/4, though the 300/4 IS + 1.4x has gotten some work):

Wilson's Phalarope x 4








Killdeer on the next (in the refuge parking lot, which is typical):



Male followed by female gadwall:




  
dhogaza



Posts: 525
Joined: Feb. 2006

(Permalink) Posted: May 18 2012,22:46   

Freddie: beautiful wren up there.

Damn, I almost called it "winter wren" because growing up our winter wren was considered conspecific with your "wren" (Troglodytes troglodytes).  I decided maybe I should double-check that and learned that splitters have run amok.

Ours is now Troglodytes hiemalis, which sounds vaguely like a Troglodytes troglodytes that's acquired some sort of socially embarrassing disease ...

Anyway, really nice shot of a very, very tiny and often hyperactive bird.

  
Freddie



Posts: 366
Joined: Oct. 2009

(Permalink) Posted: May 19 2012,02:09   

Quote (dhogaza @ May 18 2012,22:46)
Freddie: beautiful wren up there.

Damn, I almost called it "winter wren" because growing up our winter wren was considered conspecific with your "wren" (Troglodytes troglodytes).  I decided maybe I should double-check that and learned that splitters have run amok.

Ours is now Troglodytes hiemalis, which sounds vaguely like a Troglodytes troglodytes that's acquired some sort of socially embarrassing disease ...

Anyway, really nice shot of a very, very tiny and often hyperactive bird.

Thanks!  You've got some nice ones there too ... especially the Wilson's Phalarope which I had never heard of before today!  I have a small lake nearby with a  good variety or birds but it's hard to get close enough to the edge for a decent picture (it's wetlands so not easy to get across - no access and the potential to disturb a lot going on on the ground).

Troglodytes troglodytes is such a great  name - but it's the only type of wren we get in the UK.  You inspired me to post my 'angry' pose from the same bird, not quite as sharp but good for a laugh perhaps :-)



--------------
Joe: Most criticisims of ID stem from ignorance and jealousy.
Joe: As for the authors of the books in the Bible, well the OT was authored by Moses and the NT was authored by various people.
Byers: The eskimo would not need hairy hair growth as hair, I say, is for keeping people dry. Not warm.

  
dhogaza



Posts: 525
Joined: Feb. 2006

(Permalink) Posted: May 19 2012,08:31   

Quote
Troglodytes troglodytes is such a great  name - but it's the only type of wren we get in the UK.


It is such a great name!  The fact that our winter wren has lost it saddens me.  Yes, I know that "wren" is your one-and-only wren and that "winter wren" reflects the fact that we have more than one.  Of course "winter wren" sings like crazy in spring ...

Late next week I'll be camped in a place that's thick with our house wren.  If it doesn't rain as badly as predicted (sigh) maybe I'll chase one around and will post the results to compare with Troglodytes troglodytes ...

  
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