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Erasmus, FCD



Posts: 6349
Joined: June 2007

(Permalink) Posted: May 15 2009,16:01   

jean there are new and old world beans right?

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You're obviously illiterate as hell. Peach, bro.-FtK

Finding something hard to believe based on the evidence, is science.-JoeG

the odds of getting some loathsome taint are low-- Gordon E Mullings Manjack Heights Montserrat

I work on molecular systems with pathway charts and such.-Giggles

  
jeannot



Posts: 1200
Joined: Jan. 2006

(Permalink) Posted: May 15 2009,18:29   

The broad bean is Vicia faba, one of the first crops. I guess new world beans belong to Phaseolus sp. Both genera are unrelated. In fact Vicia is paraphyletic in respect to Pisum, Lens and Lathyrus. Its "sister" genus may be Trifolium (clovers), but phylogenies are not very robust in the Viciae tribe.

The tree of life web project has detailed entries on legumes, thanks to Martin Wojciechowski, the authority.

  
Timothy McDougald



Posts: 1008
Joined: Dec. 2006

(Permalink) Posted: May 15 2009,20:22   

This is pretty cool. Description of an early Cretaceous termite (Isoptera: Kalotermitidae) and its associated intestinal protozoa, with comments on their co-evolution. Here is the abstract:

Quote
Background: The remarkable mutualistic associations between termites and protists are in large part responsible for the evolutionary success of these eusocial insects. It is unknown when this symbiosis was first established, but the present study shows that fossil termite protists existed in the Mesozoic.

Results: A new species of termite (Kalotermes burmensis n. sp.) in Early Cretaceous Burmese amber had part of its abdomen damaged, thus exposing trophic stages and cysts of diverse protists. Some protists were still attached to the gut intima while others were in the amber matrix adjacent to the damaged portion. Ten new fossil flagellate species in the Trichomonada, Hypermastigida and Oxymonadea are described in nine new genera assigned to 6 extant families. Systematic placement and names of the fossil flagellates are based on morphological similarities with extant genera associated with lower termites. The following new flagellate taxa are established: Foainites icelus n. gen. n. sp., Spiromastigites acanthodes n. gen. n. sp., Trichonymphites henis n. gen., n. sp., Teranymphites rhabdotis n. gen. n. sp., Oxymonas protus n. sp., Oxymonites gerus n. gen., n. sp., Microrhopalodites polynucleatis n. gen., n. sp., Sauromonites katatonis n. gen., n. sp., Dinenymphites spiris n. gen., n. sp., Pyrsonymphites cordylinis n. gen., n. sp. A new genus of fossil amoeba is also described as Endamoebites proterus n. gen., n. sp. Fourteen additional trophic and encystid protist stages are figured and briefly characterized.

Conclusion: This represents the earliest fossil record of mutualism between microorganisms and animals and the first descriptions of protists from a fossil termite. Discovering the same orders, families and possibly genera of protists that occur today in Early Cretaceous kalotermitids shows considerable behaviour and morphological stability of both host and protists. The possible significance of protist cysts associated with the fossil termite is discussed in regards the possibility that coprophagy, as well as proctodeal trophallaxis, was a method by which some termite protozoa were transferred intrastadially and intergenerationally at this time.


The article is open access.

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Church burning ebola boy

FTK: I Didn't answer your questions because it beats the hell out of me.

PaV: I suppose for me to be pried away from what I do to focus long and hard on that particular problem would take, quite honestly, hundreds of thousands of dollars to begin to pique my interest.

   
Henry J



Posts: 4058
Joined: Mar. 2005

(Permalink) Posted: May 15 2009,22:01   

Quote
A perduring object, or species, thus threatens to disintegrate into a series of theoretically infinitely thin time-slices, i.e., fleeting Whiteheadian ?occasions? (Whitehead 1979) that are spatio-temporally located parts of processes whose moment ?of becoming is also their moment of perishing? such that they themselves neither change nor move (Sherburne 1966, pp. 210, 222).


So a species is a quantum waveform in a four dimensional space? Such that taking one kind of measurement makes look like a single thing, but another type of measurement makes it look like a wave that's spread out in several directions? Also with the problem that the act of trying to measure it causes uncertainty in the result. :lol:

Henry

  
Erasmus, FCD



Posts: 6349
Joined: June 2007

(Permalink) Posted: May 15 2009,22:38   

yeah i'm not so sure that is helpful in thinking about species are.  but it might be if i knew wtf it was supposed to mean.

and it seems like all of it requires that you forget about the delimitation part.  just believe that there even is such a thing as a matter of faith.  

works good enough for picking blackberries

ETA and it just occurred to me that i could wiki the beans thing.  i suck at internetz but thats purty cool

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You're obviously illiterate as hell. Peach, bro.-FtK

Finding something hard to believe based on the evidence, is science.-JoeG

the odds of getting some loathsome taint are low-- Gordon E Mullings Manjack Heights Montserrat

I work on molecular systems with pathway charts and such.-Giggles

  
Richard Simons



Posts: 425
Joined: Oct. 2006

(Permalink) Posted: May 15 2009,23:09   

Quote (jeannot @ May 15 2009,15:41)
I am not sure that the wild ancestor of pea is extinct. I thought it was Pisum fulvum.

But the wild ancestor of broad bean, which is as old as cultivated pea, is unknown/extinct.

You could be right about the pea. It is a long time since I've done any reading on the topic and I don't have my material on the subject handy.

Regarding New World vs Old World beans; faba beans (=broad beans, horse beans) and of course soya beans are Old World species and Phaseolus is a New World group (mainly Central/South America). There was a lot of work studying the origins of Phaseolus beans and things may have changed, but many beans are regarded as one species - green, wax, white, haricot, navy, black, black-eyed, pinto and kidney beans. Lima/butter beans are different and so are runner beans - but still Phaseolus.

It's interesting to think about what food plants people did not have available. I've tried one or two of the traditional leafy vegetables that fell out of favour and it's easy to tell why they were dropped.

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All sweeping statements are wrong.

  
ppb



Posts: 325
Joined: Dec. 2006

(Permalink) Posted: May 21 2009,08:46   

I know you guys tend more towards the biological sciences, but since Creationists think evolution covers the Big Bang and is pretty much the Theory of Everything (evil), I thought I would share this item from the good Dr Phil's Bad Astronomy blog.  It is a video of the center of the Milky Way Galaxy rising over the Texas Star Party.

It was taken with a Canon EOS-5D with filter modifications to record hydrogen alpha at 656 nm.  An EF 15mm f/2.8 lens was used, and the exposures were controlled by a timer, 20 seconds of exposure followed by 40 seconds off.

The results are spectacular.  I've seen the Milky Way under really dark skies, but it was nothing quite like this!

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"[A scientific theory] describes Nature as absurd from the point of view of common sense. And it agrees fully with experiment. So I hope you can accept Nature as She is - absurd."
- Richard P. Feynman

  
dvunkannon



Posts: 1377
Joined: June 2008

(Permalink) Posted: May 26 2009,11:19   

Quote (Henry J @ May 15 2009,23:01)
Quote
A perduring object, or species, thus threatens to disintegrate into a series of theoretically infinitely thin time-slices, i.e., fleeting Whiteheadian ?occasions? (Whitehead 1979) that are spatio-temporally located parts of processes whose moment ?of becoming is also their moment of perishing? such that they themselves neither change nor move (Sherburne 1966, pp. 210, 222).


So a species is a quantum waveform in a four dimensional space? Such that taking one kind of measurement makes look like a single thing, but another type of measurement makes it look like a wave that's spread out in several directions? Also with the problem that the act of trying to measure it causes uncertainty in the result. :lol:

Henry

I haz confuze. How does Sherburne 1966 quote Whitehead 1979?

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I’m referring to evolution, not changes in allele frequencies. - Cornelius Hunter
I’m not an evolutionist, I’m a change in allele frequentist! - Nakashima

  
Henry J



Posts: 4058
Joined: Mar. 2005

(Permalink) Posted: May 26 2009,23:35   

Well, I was describing an analogy (perhaps an overly loose one) that occurred to me on reading that. I can't help it if the two concepts got published in the wrong order. :D

Henry

  
Erasmus, FCD



Posts: 6349
Joined: June 2007

(Permalink) Posted: May 27 2009,00:00   

it's not like the original is easy to read anyway.  there is a stone in the soup but i almost can't be arsed to find it

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You're obviously illiterate as hell. Peach, bro.-FtK

Finding something hard to believe based on the evidence, is science.-JoeG

the odds of getting some loathsome taint are low-- Gordon E Mullings Manjack Heights Montserrat

I work on molecular systems with pathway charts and such.-Giggles

  
khan



Posts: 1482
Joined: May 2007

(Permalink) Posted: May 28 2009,17:32   

Meteoric organics

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"It's as if all those words, in their hurry to escape from the loony, have fallen over each other, forming scrambled heaps of meaninglessness." -damitall

That's so fucking stupid it merits a wing in the museum of stupid. -midwifetoad

  
Lou FCD



Posts: 5378
Joined: Jan. 2006

(Permalink) Posted: May 28 2009,19:20   

Quote (ppb @ May 21 2009,09:46)
I know you guys tend more towards the biological sciences, but since Creationists think evolution covers the Big Bang and is pretty much the Theory of Everything (evil), I thought I would share this item from the good Dr Phil's Bad Astronomy blog.  It is a video of the center of the Milky Way Galaxy rising over the Texas Star Party.

It was taken with a Canon EOS-5D with filter modifications to record hydrogen alpha at 656 nm.  An EF 15mm f/2.8 lens was used, and the exposures were controlled by a timer, 20 seconds of exposure followed by 40 seconds off.

The results are spectacular.  I've seen the Milky Way under really dark skies, but it was nothing quite like this!

I'm looking for just such a filter for my new Canon EOS Rebel XS. I'm trying to avoid the duct tape route, but hey, a man's gotta do...

ETA: Near as I can tell to this point, there's no front end filter to just screw on, it requires serious surgery on the camera. I'd like to avoid that, too.

Edited by Lou FCD on May 28 2009,20:26

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Lou FCD is still in school, so we should only count him as a baby biologist. -carlsonjok -deprecated
I think I might love you. Don't tell Deadman -Wolfhound

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ppb



Posts: 325
Joined: Dec. 2006

(Permalink) Posted: May 28 2009,22:57   

Quote (Lou FCD @ May 28 2009,20:20)
ETA: Near as I can tell to this point, there's no front end filter to just screw on, it requires serious surgery on the camera. I'd like to avoid that, too.

That's the impression I had from the description.  Not something that I would want to do to my camera.

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"[A scientific theory] describes Nature as absurd from the point of view of common sense. And it agrees fully with experiment. So I hope you can accept Nature as She is - absurd."
- Richard P. Feynman

  
Nerull



Posts: 317
Joined: June 2007

(Permalink) Posted: May 29 2009,00:53   

If this is the procedure I think it is, it consists of removing the factory installed IR filter in front of the CMOS sensor, and replacing it with clear to improve sensitivity. It does require surgery inside the camera and is a bit of a delicate operation.

Canon made a series of 20Ds that never had the filter installed for a while, but they were discontinued.

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To rebut creationism you pretty much have to be a biologist, chemist, geologist, philosopher, lawyer and historian all rolled into one. While to advocate creationism, you just have to be an idiot. -- tommorris

   
nuytsia



Posts: 131
Joined: June 2006

(Permalink) Posted: May 29 2009,07:53   

Quote (Richard Simons @ May 15 2009,15:09)
     
Quote (jeannot @ May 15 2009,15:41)
I am not sure that the wild ancestor of pea is extinct. I thought it was Pisum fulvum.

But the wild ancestor of broad bean, which is as old as cultivated pea, is unknown/extinct.

You could be right about the pea. It is a long time since I've done any reading on the topic and I don't have my material on the subject handy.

-snip-

I had to attend a meeting at a plant breeding institute a few years ago and was told at the time that the pea was domesticated twice once in the middle east and once in Ethiopia. I got the distinct impression that these were from different species but must admit my memory is rather fuzzy on the detail and I certainly don't have any refs. :(

In regard to the synthesis of RNA article, I found this comment on the Nature page interesting.
     
Quote
What is most promising is that it may lead us to be able to show, definitively, that man did not in fact ascend or evolve from apes [as I had always found odd] but rather we evolved along a seperate, but similar strain of the same... for lack of a better term, primordial ooze. Like the other prehistoric beasts, some went inland and some went back to the seas, and others still made for the trees. This is a wonderful study and I hope to read more.

WTF?  ???

   
Quack



Posts: 1755
Joined: May 2007

(Permalink) Posted: May 29 2009,09:13   

Quote (nuytsia @ May 29 2009,07:53)

In regard to the synthesis of RNA article, I found this comment on the Nature page interesting.
               
Quote
What is most promising is that it may lead us to be able to show, definitively, that man did not in fact ascend or evolve from apes [as I had always found odd] but rather we evolved along a seperate, but similar strain of the same... for lack of a better term, primordial ooze. Like the other prehistoric beasts, some went inland and some went back to the seas, and others still made for the trees. This is a wonderful study and I hope to read more.

WTF?  ???

There goes common descent down the drain - or maybe the 'tree of life'?

Ed. modified statement.

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YEC creationists denigrate science without an inkling of what their lives would be without it. YEC creationism is an enrageous, abominable insult to the the human intellect.
                                                         Me.

  
JLT



Posts: 740
Joined: Jan. 2008

(Permalink) Posted: June 04 2009,07:37   

Quote

FOXP2 and Human Cognition

Our restless species strives ceaselessly to invent ever more useful devices, improve our social systems, and create new works of art. Our creative ability derives from motor and cognitive flexibility that allows us to form a potentially unbounded number of new words and sentences as well as tools, art, dance forms, and music; it is a fundamental defining attribute of Homo sapiens that presumably derives from a suite of neural capabilities absent or greatly reduced in other species. The archaeological record, however, reveals few signs of creativity earlier than not, vert, similar200,000 years ago in Africa, with a burst of creativity appearing in Homo sapiens during the Upper Paleolithic, not, vert, similar50,000 years ago ([Klein, 1999] and McBrearty and Brooks, 2000 S. McBrearty and A.S. Brooks, J. Hum. Evol. 39 (2000), pp. 453–563. Abstract |  PDF (2416 K)  | View Record in Scopus | Cited By in Scopus (314)[McBrearty and Brooks, 2000]). Something must have modified the brains of our ancestors in that distant time, the period associated with both the appearance of the immediate ancestors of modern humans and the amino acid substitutions that differentiate the human form of the FOXP2 gene from that of chimpanzees. Now, Enard, Paabo and their colleagues shed new light on the role of the FOXP2 gene on the evolution of human language and cognition (Enard et al., 2009).

They report, in this issue, the results of introducing into mice the human version of the Foxp2 gene. The mice exhibited alterations in ultrasonic vocalizations and exploratory behavior as well as changes in brain dopamine concentrations. The neurological consequences provide an explanation for why human speech, language, and cognitive capacity transcend those of living apes, as well as the cognitive abilities of our distant hominid ancestors that can be inferred from the archaeological record. In mice with a “humanized” Foxp2 gene, the medium spiny neurons of the basal ganglia show increased synaptic plasticity and dendrite length. Such changes enhance the efficiency of neural cortico-basal ganglia circuits, the brain mechanisms that in humans are known to regulate motor control including speech, word recognition, sentence comprehension, recognition of visual forms, mental arithmetic, and other aspects of cognition (Figure 1).

[....]
This brings us to the signal achievements of Enard and his colleagues (Enard et al., 2009). The FOXP2 story started with the discovery of a mutation in this gene in an extended family in the UK that resulted in extreme speech motor-control deficits, deficits in language comprehension, and lower scores on standardized intelligence tests. Neuroimaging studies revealed anomalies in basal ganglia morphology and activity. Embryological studies then showed that both the mouse and human versions of this gene modulate development of the basal ganglia and other subcortical structures. Moreover, the two amino acid substitutions that differentiate the human form of FOXP2 from that of chimpanzees occurred and were fixed within the past 200,000 years, the period associated with the appearance of the immediate ancestors of modern humans and Neanderthals. However, it has not been clear whether the behavioral deficits associated with the aberrant missense mutation in the affected family members have any bearing on the effects of the human form of FOXP2 on the brain. With their new study, Enard and coworkers resolve this issue. They demonstrate that the amino acid substitutions that mark the human form of FOXP2 would have played a key role in the evolution of the human brain by increasing synaptic plasticity and dendrite length and connectivity in the basal ganglia.

The proximate “tinkering” logic of evolution has often been pointed out. In a sense, we can view the effects of the human form of FOXP2 as a sort of “tuning” that brought the cortico-striatal circuits that humans inherited from other species to a state of higher efficiency. Synaptic plasticity is the key to how neurons code and process information. Dendrites connect the neuronal map, channeling information between neurons. Neurophysiological texts contain hundreds of references to studies that note the roles of synaptic plasticity and neuronal connectivity in forming new associations and new action patterns—the Hebbian (Hebb, 1949) “computational” processes of the brain that appear to underlie virtually all aspects of cognition.

As is the case for all significant discoveries, the new work addresses seemingly unrelated issues and raises further questions. The earliest surviving hominid fossils that could have had tongues capable of producing fully modern speech date back 50,000 years to the Upper Paleolithic (Lieberman and McCarthy, 2007). In earlier Middle Pleistocene fossils, in which the neck segment is equal to the mouth segment, neck lengths were too short to accommodate a human tongue. Tongue proportions that facilitate speech came at the cost of increasing the risk of choking—the fourth leading cause of accidental death in the U.S. Therefore, a human tongue would be worse than useless unless the hominid in question also had cortico-basal ganglia circuits capable of executing the rapid, complex motor gestures that are necessary to produce articulate speech. The presence of a human tongue in Upper Paleolithic hominids thus serves as an index for the presence of these neural circuits. But as Enard et al., 2009 W. Enard, S. Gehre, K. Hammerschmidt, S.M. Hölter, T. Blass, M. Somel, M.K. Brückner, C. Schreiweis, C. Winter and R. Sohr et al., Cell (2009) this issue.Enard et al. (2009) show, cortico-basal ganglia circuits could have evolved before the appearance of the modern human tongue, explaining the presence of some Upper Paleolithic artifacts in Africa >50,000 years ago.

Finally, these results argue against Noam Chomsky's views concerning the neural bases of human language. In all versions of Chomskian theory, the central claim is that humans possess a species-specific, innate, neural “organ,” devoted to language and language alone. Language in Chomsky's theories, moreover, is equated with syntax, the means by which distinctions in meaning are conveyed in a sentence. Cortico-basal ganglia circuits clearly are involved in sentence comprehension, but enhanced human cortico-basal ganglia circuit efficiency clearly would be expressed in cognitive acts beyond language and motor control. With the study by Enard and his colleagues, we have reached a new milestone in the journey toward understanding the evolution of human cognition.


Enard et al., A Humanized Version of Foxp2 Affects Cortico-Basal Ganglia Circuits in Mice
Cell, Volume 137, Issue 5, 29 May 2009, Pages 961-971


Short video summary of Enard's and Pääbo's results

ETA: The original article is open access. If the above link isn't working try this one.

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"Random mutations, if they are truly random, will affect, and potentially damage, any aspect of the organism, [...]
Thus, a realistic [computer] simulation [of evolution] would allow the program, OS, and hardware to be affected in a random fashion." GilDodgen, Frilly shirt owner

  
J-Dog



Posts: 4362
Joined: Dec. 2006

(Permalink) Posted: June 04 2009,08:14   

I just received a jpeg of the FOXP2 mouse they experimented on...FOXP2 Mouse

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Come on Tough Guy, do the little dance of ID impotence you do so well. - Louis to Joe G 2/10

Gullibility is not a virtue - Quidam on Dembski's belief in the Bible Code Faith Healers & ID 7/08

UD is an Unnatural Douchemagnet. - richardthughes 7/11

  
Wesley R. Elsberry



Posts: 4482
Joined: May 2002

(Permalink) Posted: June 04 2009,10:45   

If you want to try something without the cost and modification headaches of the hydrogen alpha filter, just slap a 25A (deep red) filter on your lens and do some time exposures. If that looks like the sort of thing you like, you can decide whether to step up to the hydrogen alpha filter. The 25A will get you much of the benefit of the narrow-band hydrogen alpha filter by dropping out blue and green light contributions. Unless what you are battling is sodium-arc light pollution, it should do a pretty decent job. Drive further out into the country to get away from the light pollution.

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"You can't teach an old dogma new tricks." - Dorothy Parker

    
dvunkannon



Posts: 1377
Joined: June 2008

(Permalink) Posted: June 04 2009,12:31   

Quote (JLT @ June 04 2009,08:37)
 
Quote

FOXP2 and Human Cognition

The proximate “tinkering” logic of evolution has often been pointed out. In a sense, we can view the effects of the human form of FOXP2 as a sort of “tuning” that brought the cortico-striatal circuits that humans inherited from other species to a state of higher efficiency.


Hmm, I'm going to have to skim it again. I didn't see "efficiency" the first time through. I'm pretty sure mice had a highly efficient FoxP2 gene and cortical neurons for their niche. If they are less jittery and more thoughtful mice, thay are worse mice, no matter what that tells us about humans.

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I’m referring to evolution, not changes in allele frequencies. - Cornelius Hunter
I’m not an evolutionist, I’m a change in allele frequentist! - Nakashima

  
JLT



Posts: 740
Joined: Jan. 2008

(Permalink) Posted: June 04 2009,18:09   

Quote (dvunkannon @ June 04 2009,18:31)
 
Quote (JLT @ June 04 2009,08:37)
   
Quote

FOXP2 and Human Cognition

The proximate “tinkering” logic of evolution has often been pointed out. In a sense, we can view the effects of the human form of FOXP2 as a sort of “tuning” that brought the cortico-striatal circuits that humans inherited from other species to a state of higher efficiency.


Hmm, I'm going to have to skim it again. I didn't see "efficiency" the first time through. I'm pretty sure mice had a highly efficient FoxP2 gene and cortical neurons for their niche. If they are less jittery and more thoughtful mice, thay are worse mice, no matter what that tells us about humans.

How do you know they are worse mice?

*





* You're right, of course. That's a very anthropocentric view.

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"Random mutations, if they are truly random, will affect, and potentially damage, any aspect of the organism, [...]
Thus, a realistic [computer] simulation [of evolution] would allow the program, OS, and hardware to be affected in a random fashion." GilDodgen, Frilly shirt owner

  
Lou FCD



Posts: 5378
Joined: Jan. 2006

(Permalink) Posted: June 05 2009,16:29   

Quote (Wesley R. Elsberry @ June 04 2009,11:45)
If you want to try something without the cost and modification headaches of the hydrogen alpha filter, just slap a 25A (deep red) filter on your lens and do some time exposures. If that looks like the sort of thing you like, you can decide whether to step up to the hydrogen alpha filter. The 25A will get you much of the benefit of the narrow-band hydrogen alpha filter by dropping out blue and green light contributions. Unless what you are battling is sodium-arc light pollution, it should do a pretty decent job. Drive further out into the country to get away from the light pollution.

Thanks, Wesley. I'll give that a go.

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Lou FCD is still in school, so we should only count him as a baby biologist. -carlsonjok -deprecated
I think I might love you. Don't tell Deadman -Wolfhound

Work-friendly photography
NSFW photography

   
Richardthughes



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(Permalink) Posted: June 08 2009,16:10   

http://www.physorg.com/news163328877.html


Brace for Quotemining from DO'L.

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"Richardthughes, you magnificent bastard, I stand in awe of you..." : Arden Chatfield
"You magnificent bastard! " : Louis
"ATBC poster child", "I have to agree with Rich.." : DaveTard
"I bow to your superior skills" : deadman_932
"...it was Richardthughes making me lie in bed.." : Kristine

  
Gunthernacus



Posts: 232
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(Permalink) Posted: June 08 2009,16:27   

Quote (Richardthughes @ June 08 2009,17:10)
http://www.physorg.com/news163328877.html


Brace for Quotemining from DO'L.

Bradford at Tardic Thoughts beat you (and DO'L) to it.

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Given that we are all descended from Adam and Eve...genetic defects as a result of intra-family marriage would not begin to crop up until after the first few dozen generations. - Dr. Hugh Ross

  
Lou FCD



Posts: 5378
Joined: Jan. 2006

(Permalink) Posted: June 08 2009,21:00   

Quote (Gunthernacus @ June 08 2009,17:27)
Quote (Richardthughes @ June 08 2009,17:10)
http://www.physorg.com/news163328877.html


Brace for Quotemining from DO'L.

Bradford at Tardic Thoughts beat you (and DO'L) to it.

Slimey Sal jumps in there to yap at oleg's ankles.

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Lou FCD is still in school, so we should only count him as a baby biologist. -carlsonjok -deprecated
I think I might love you. Don't tell Deadman -Wolfhound

Work-friendly photography
NSFW photography

   
Richardthughes



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(Permalink) Posted: June 09 2009,10:47   

Related: Quantum woo:

http://www.physorg.com/news163670588.html

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"Richardthughes, you magnificent bastard, I stand in awe of you..." : Arden Chatfield
"You magnificent bastard! " : Louis
"ATBC poster child", "I have to agree with Rich.." : DaveTard
"I bow to your superior skills" : deadman_932
"...it was Richardthughes making me lie in bed.." : Kristine

  
Lou FCD



Posts: 5378
Joined: Jan. 2006

(Permalink) Posted: June 09 2009,10:55   

Quote (Richardthughes @ June 09 2009,11:47)
Related: Quantum woo:

http://www.physorg.com/news163670588.html

Oh, this smacks of something familiar:

Quote
Marin lays out each player’s role and perspective in the controversy, and argues that studying the original interpretations of quantum mechanics can help scientists better understand the theory, and could also be important for the public in general.


I hope the article gets better as I go along.

Unrelated: WTF is up with physicists and hair?

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Lou FCD is still in school, so we should only count him as a baby biologist. -carlsonjok -deprecated
I think I might love you. Don't tell Deadman -Wolfhound

Work-friendly photography
NSFW photography

   
Richardthughes



Posts: 10114
Joined: Jan. 2006

(Permalink) Posted: June 09 2009,11:06   

Quote (Lou FCD @ June 09 2009,10:55)
*snip*

Unrelated: WTF is up with physicists and hair?

HAR HAR HEDDLE AND OLEG.

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"Richardthughes, you magnificent bastard, I stand in awe of you..." : Arden Chatfield
"You magnificent bastard! " : Louis
"ATBC poster child", "I have to agree with Rich.." : DaveTard
"I bow to your superior skills" : deadman_932
"...it was Richardthughes making me lie in bed.." : Kristine

  
KCdgw



Posts: 368
Joined: Sep. 2002

(Permalink) Posted: June 09 2009,11:09   

Quote (Richardthughes @ June 09 2009,11:06)
Quote (Lou FCD @ June 09 2009,10:55)
*snip*

Unrelated: WTF is up with physicists and hair?

HAR HAR HEDDLE AND OLEG.

Physicists and hair? What about biologists?

Steven Pinker:




Kevin Padian:



KC

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Those who know the truth are not equal to those who love it-- Confucius

  
Lou FCD



Posts: 5378
Joined: Jan. 2006

(Permalink) Posted: June 09 2009,11:17   

Quote (KCdgw @ June 09 2009,12:09)
Quote (Richardthughes @ June 09 2009,11:06)
 
Quote (Lou FCD @ June 09 2009,10:55)
*snip*

Unrelated: WTF is up with physicists and hair?

HAR HAR HEDDLE AND OLEG.

Physicists and hair? What about biologists?

Steven Pinker:




Kevin Padian:



KC

Point taken.

May I amend the question to "Scientists and hair"?

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Lou FCD is still in school, so we should only count him as a baby biologist. -carlsonjok -deprecated
I think I might love you. Don't tell Deadman -Wolfhound

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