RSS 2.0 Feed

» Welcome Guest Log In :: Register

Pages: (54) < 1 [2] 3 4 5 6 7 ... >   
  Topic: Science Break, Selected Shorts< Next Oldest | Next Newest >  
CeilingCat



Posts: 1662
Joined: Dec. 2007

(Permalink) Posted: July 29 2008,06:35   

Quote
Sexy People Sound Better
By Greg Soltis, LiveScience Staff
posted: 16 July 2008 06:54 am ET

People with voices deemed sexy and attractive tend to have greater body symmetry upon close inspection, suggesting that what we hear in a person can greatly affect what we see in them.

"The sound of a person's voice reveals a considerable amount of biological information," said Susan Hughes, an evolutionary psychologist from Albright College in Reading, Pa. "It can reflect the mate value of a person."

Hughes, whose new study is detailed in the June 2008 edition of the Journal of Nonverbal Behavior, cautions that an attractive voice does not necessarily indicate that this person has an attractive face.

Greg was never on the CB.

--------------
Like every other academic field, philosophy of religion has its share of hacks and mediocrities.  Edward Feser

  
afarensis



Posts: 1005
Joined: Dec. 2006

(Permalink) Posted: July 30 2008,07:47   

Here is one:

Dinosaurian Soft Tissues Interpreted as Bacterial Biofilms

Quote
A scanning electron microscope survey was initiated to determine if the previously reported findings of “dinosaurian soft tissues” could be identified in situ within the bones. The results obtained allowed a reinterpretation of the formation and preservation of several types of these “tissues” and their content. Mineralized and non-mineralized coatings were found extensively in the porous trabecular bone of a variety of dinosaur and mammal species across time. They represent bacterial biofilms common throughout nature. Biofilms form endocasts and once dissolved out of the bone, mimic real blood vessels and osteocytes. Bridged trails observed in biofilms indicate that a previously viscous film was populated with swimming bacteria. Carbon dating of the film points to its relatively modern origin. A comparison of infrared spectra of modern biofilms with modern collagen and fossil bone coatings suggests that modern biofilms share a closer molecular make-up than modern collagen to the coatings from fossil bones. Blood cell size iron-oxygen spheres found in the vessels were identified as an oxidized form of formerly pyritic framboids. Our observations appeal to a more conservative explanation for the structures found preserved in fossil bone.


--------------
Church burning ebola boy

FTK: I Didn't answer your questions because it beats the hell out of me.

PaV: I suppose for me to be pried away from what I do to focus long and hard on that particular problem would take, quite honestly, hundreds of thousands of dollars to begin to pique my interest.

   
Lou FCD



Posts: 5377
Joined: Jan. 2006

(Permalink) Posted: Aug. 05 2008,19:36   

Phoenix Mars Team Opens Window on Scientific Process

So the Phoenix mission team has found evidence of perchlorate salts in the Martian soil, but instead of waiting for the complete analysis, they're letting the public in on the process.

Quote
"The Phoenix project has decided to take an unusual step" in talking about the research when its scientists are only about half-way through the data collection phase and have not yet had time to complete data analysis or perform needed laboratory work, said Phoenix principal investigator Peter Smith of the University of Arizona, Tucson. Scientists are still at the stage where they are examining multiple hypotheses, given evidence that the soil contains perchlorate.

"We decided to show the public science in action because of the extreme interest in the Phoenix mission, which is searching for a habitable environment on the northern plains of Mars," Smith added. "Right now, we don't know whether finding perchlorate is good news or bad news for possible life on Mars."


More at the link.

--------------
Lou FCD is still in school, so we should only count him as a baby biologist. -carlsonjok -deprecated
I think I might love you. Don't tell Deadman -Wolfhound

Work-friendly photography
NSFW photography

   
afarensis



Posts: 1005
Joined: Dec. 2006

(Permalink) Posted: Aug. 05 2008,20:24   

Paging Dr. Egnor!

Metabolic changes in schizophrenia and human brain evolution

Quote
Background

Despite decades of research, the molecular changes responsible for the evolution of human cognitive abilities remain unknown. Comparative evolutionary studies provide detailed information about DNA sequence and mRNA expression differences between humans and other primates but, in the absence of other information, it has proved very difficult to identify molecular pathways relevant to human cognition.
Results

Here, we compare changes in gene expression and metabolite concentrations in the human brain and compare them to the changes seen in a disorder known to affect human cognitive abilities, schizophrenia. We find that both genes and metabolites relating to energy metabolism and energy-expensive brain functions are altered in schizophrenia and, at the same time, appear to have changed rapidly during recent human evolution, probably as a result of positive selection.
Conclusions

Our findings, along with several previous studies, suggest that the evolution of human cognitive abilities was accompanied by adaptive changes in brain metabolism, potentially pushing the human brain to the limit of its metabolic capabilities.


The pdf is freely downloadable.

On a related note:

A Novel Molecular Solution for Ultraviolet Light Detection in Caenorhabditis elegans

Quote
For many organisms the ability to transduce light into cellular signals is crucial for survival. Light stimulates DNA repair and metabolism changes in bacteria, avoidance responses in single-cell organisms, attraction responses in plants, and both visual and nonvisual perception in animals. Despite these widely differing responses, in all of nature there are only six known families of proteins that can transduce light. Although the roundworm Caenorhabditis elegans has none of the known light transduction systems, we show here that C. elegans strongly accelerates its locomotion in response to blue or shorter wavelengths of light, with maximal responsiveness to ultraviolet light. Our data suggest that C. elegans uses this light response to escape the lethal doses of sunlight that permeate its habitat. Short-wavelength light drives locomotion by bypassing two critical signals, cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) and diacylglycerol (DAG), that neurons use to shape and control behaviors. C. elegans mutants lacking these signals are paralyzed and unresponsive to harsh physical stimuli in ambient light, but short-wavelength light rapidly rescues their paralysis and restores normal levels of coordinated locomotion. This light response is mediated by LITE-1, a novel ultraviolet light receptor that acts in neurons and is a member of the invertebrate Gustatory receptor (Gr) family. Heterologous expression of the receptor in muscle cells is sufficient to confer light responsiveness on cells that are normally unresponsive to light. Our results reveal a novel molecular solution for ultraviolet light detection and an unusual sensory modality in C. elegans that is unlike any previously described light response in any organism.


I haven't read this later one yet but PhysOrg says it has something to do with depression, schizophrenia and insomnia in humans...

--------------
Church burning ebola boy

FTK: I Didn't answer your questions because it beats the hell out of me.

PaV: I suppose for me to be pried away from what I do to focus long and hard on that particular problem would take, quite honestly, hundreds of thousands of dollars to begin to pique my interest.

   
stevestory



Posts: 8882
Joined: Oct. 2005

(Permalink) Posted: Aug. 07 2008,20:20   

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/earth....106.xml

   
afarensis



Posts: 1005
Joined: Dec. 2006

(Permalink) Posted: Aug. 07 2008,21:43   

Quote (stevestory @ Aug. 07 2008,20:20)
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/earth....106.xml

Awesome!

More here

This is somewhat off topic but is really cool nonetheless. The University of Utah has a "Learn Genetics" website. In one of the activities you can learn to extract DNA in the privacy of your own kitchen!

All it takes is a blender and some common household chemicals...

--------------
Church burning ebola boy

FTK: I Didn't answer your questions because it beats the hell out of me.

PaV: I suppose for me to be pried away from what I do to focus long and hard on that particular problem would take, quite honestly, hundreds of thousands of dollars to begin to pique my interest.

   
Lou FCD



Posts: 5377
Joined: Jan. 2006

(Permalink) Posted: Aug. 09 2008,09:12   

Deadman posted this here, in its own thread, but it makes a nice addition here:

Quote (Deadman_932 @ Aug. 09 2008,09:59)
Green et al. (2008) A Complete Neandertal Mitochondrial Genome Sequence Determined by High-Throughput Sequencing. Cell, 2008; 134 (3): 416
Quote
The complete mitochondrial genome of a 38,000-year-old Neanderthal has been sequenced...Analysis of the new sequence confirms that the mitochondria of Neanderthals falls outside the variation found in humans today, offering no evidence of admixture between the two lineages although it remains a possibility. It also shows that the last common ancestor of Neanderthals and humans lived about 660,000 years ago, give or take 140,000 years.


Science Daily write-up: http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/08/080807130824.htm


Journal article abstract:
http://www.cell.com/content/article/abstract?uid=PIIS0092867408007733

The full article .PDF is available here:
http://download.cell.com/pdfs/0092-8674/PIIS0092867408007733.pdf

It’s a nice paper. Cheers!


--------------
Lou FCD is still in school, so we should only count him as a baby biologist. -carlsonjok -deprecated
I think I might love you. Don't tell Deadman -Wolfhound

Work-friendly photography
NSFW photography

   
skeptic



Posts: 1163
Joined: May 2006

(Permalink) Posted: Aug. 09 2008,20:11   

I was looking for a little help and thought this was the most appropriate place.  I'm looking for some current treatment of the contrast that introns do not appear in bacterial species as opposed to eukaryotics.  I'm interested in evolutionary or mechanistic hypotheses.  I would prefer something you guys have actually read and evaluated as opposed to random links.  Thanks in advance for any assistance you guys can provide.

P.S. it goes without saying, the more current the better, thanks.

  
deadman_932



Posts: 3094
Joined: May 2006

(Permalink) Posted: Aug. 09 2008,22:04   

Uh, bacterial introns (Class I and II) are known, just oddly distributed. This is not MY field of specialization, but here's a couple of recent articles that I've read online. The first deals with hypotheses..eh, fairly heavily. Each has references and a list of recent articles that cite it:    

-----------------

Edgell, David R.; Marlene Belfort, and David A. Shub (2000) Barriers to Intron Promiscuity in Bacteria. Journal of Bacteriology, October 2000, p. 5281-5289, Vol. 182, No. 19 http://jb.asm.org/cgi/content/full/182/19/5281

-----------------
Tourasse, N. J., Kolsto, A.-B. (2008). Survey of group I and group II introns in 29 sequenced genomes of the Bacillus cereus group: insights into their spread and evolution. Nucleic Acids Res 36: 4529-4548 http://nar.oxfordjournals.org/cgi/content/full/36/14/4529

 
Quote
Group I and group II introns are well-known genetic elements that were discovered >20 years ago. They are catalytic RNAs (ribozymes) that are capable of self-splicing, i.e. excising themselves out of RNA transcripts and ligating their flanking RNA sequences (hereafter referred as exons). They are also mobile elements as they typically encode proteins that allow them to invade genomic sequences (1–10). Introns can spread into cognate (homologous) intron-less DNA sites, a process called homing, or insert into ectopic (novel) genomic locations, a process called transposition, which usually occurs at lower frequencies. Altogether, these elements are found in all three domains of life: group I introns are present in bacteria, bacteriophages and eukaryotes (organellar and nuclear genomes), while group II introns are present in bacteria, archaea and eukaryotic organelles


-----------------
Lixin Dai and Steven Zimmerly (2002)  Compilation and analysis of group II intron insertions in bacterial genomes: evidence for retroelement behavior. Nucleic Acids Research,  30:5, pp. 1091-1102.  

http://nar.oxfordjournals.org/cgi/content/full/30/5/1091

ETA: there's some new citations on the intron wiki page here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Intron , many of which deal with theories of evolutionary origins. Nope, I haven't read them yet, don't have the time at the moment. Hope it helps, though.

--------------
AtBC Award for Thoroughness in the Face of Creationism

  
skeptic



Posts: 1163
Joined: May 2006

(Permalink) Posted: Aug. 10 2008,09:11   

thank you much

  
Albatrossity2



Posts: 2778
Joined: Mar. 2007

(Permalink) Posted: Aug. 15 2008,13:34   

That dang designer sure keeps busy.  Here is a report of a new bird species discovered in Africa.

--------------
Flesh of the sky, child of the sky, the mind
Has been obligated from the beginning
To create an ordered universe
As the only possible proof of its own inheritance.
                        - Pattiann Rogers

   
skeptic



Posts: 1163
Joined: May 2006

(Permalink) Posted: Aug. 19 2008,19:33   

Anyone read "Decoding the Universe" by Seife?  I picked it up today and I'm wondering if it's worth the effort.

  
stevestory



Posts: 8882
Joined: Oct. 2005

(Permalink) Posted: Aug. 29 2008,14:37   

http://www.popularmechanics.com/blogs/science_news/4279923.html

   
Richardthughes



Posts: 10094
Joined: Jan. 2006

(Permalink) Posted: Aug. 29 2008,14:49   

Quote (stevestory @ Aug. 29 2008,14:37)
http://www.popularmechanics.com/blogs/science_news/4279923.html

Cool! I hope DT gives you a hat-tip when he links to that, he loves nanofabrication stuff.

--------------
"Richardthughes, you magnificent bastard, I stand in awe of you..." : Arden Chatfield
"You magnificent bastard! " : Louis
"ATBC poster child", "I have to agree with Rich.." : DaveTard
"I bow to your superior skills" : deadman_932
"...it was Richardthughes making me lie in bed.." : Kristine

  
afarensis



Posts: 1005
Joined: Dec. 2006

(Permalink) Posted: Aug. 31 2008,10:06   

Rapid Antagonistic Coevolution Between Primary And Secondary Sexual Characters In Horned Beetles

Here is the abstract:

 
Quote
Different structures may compete during development for a shared and limited pool of resources to sustain growth and differentiation. The resulting resource allocation trade-offs have the potential to alter both ontogenetic outcomes and evolutionary trajectories. However, little is known about the evolutionary causes and consequences of resource allocation trade-offs in natural populations. Here, we explore the significance of resource allocation trade-offs between primary and secondary sexual traits in shaping early morphological divergences between four recently separated populations of the horned beetle Onthophagus taurus as well as macroevolutionary divergence patterns across 10 Onthophagus species. We show that resource allocation trade-offs leave a strong signature in morphological divergence patterns both within and between species. Furthermore, our results suggest that genital divergence may, under certain circumstances, occur as a byproduct of evolutionary changes in secondary sexual traits. Given the importance of copulatory organ morphology for reproductive isolation our findings begin to raise the possibility that secondary sexual trait evolution may promote speciation as a byproduct. We discuss the implications of our results on the causes and consequences of resource allocation trade-offs in insects.


Unfortunately a subscription is required for the entire article. link
DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1558-5646.2008.00448.x

--------------
Church burning ebola boy

FTK: I Didn't answer your questions because it beats the hell out of me.

PaV: I suppose for me to be pried away from what I do to focus long and hard on that particular problem would take, quite honestly, hundreds of thousands of dollars to begin to pique my interest.

   
dvunkannon



Posts: 1377
Joined: June 2008

(Permalink) Posted: Sep. 03 2008,12:03   

John Bartlett ( "johnnyb" on UD) and I went back and forth a few times on his own blog after his recent post on UD. As part of that conversation, I found this paper by Langdon on the Halting problem. The basic result is that random programs don't halt, as the program length grows larger.

This upends a favorite creationist canard about computer programming, that programs are finely tuned, one error will stop them, yada yada yada. These are teleolgical arguments. It is hard to imagine a universe in which Windows ME could either evolve or survive, and so much the better!

BTW, Bartlett showed himself to be relatively Avida-friendly, so his posting rights under the big sweatertent of DDrr.. Dembski and Scooter might be threatened in the future.

--------------
I’m referring to evolution, not changes in allele frequencies. - Cornelius Hunter
I’m not an evolutionist, I’m a change in allele frequentist! - Nakashima

  
Lou FCD



Posts: 5377
Joined: Jan. 2006

(Permalink) Posted: Sep. 03 2008,13:19   

Anybody have PNAS access? I'd like to read this paper, titled Genetic variation in the vasopressin receptor 1a gene (AVPR1A) associates with pair-bonding behavior in humans.

Abstract

 
Quote
Pair-bonding has been suggested to be a critical factor in the evolutionary development of the social brain. The brain neuropeptide arginine vasopressin (AVP) exerts an important influence on pair-bonding behavior in voles. There is a strong association between a polymorphic repeat sequence in the 5? flanking region of the gene (avpr1a) encoding one of the AVP receptor subtypes (V1aR), and proneness for monogamous behavior in males of this species. It is not yet known whether similar mechanisms are important also for human pair-bonding. Here, we report an association between one of the human AVPR1A repeat polymorphisms (RS3) and traits reflecting pair-bonding behavior in men, including partner bonding, perceived marital problems, and marital status, and show that the RS3 genotype of the males also affects marital quality as perceived by their spouses. These results suggest an association between a single gene and pair-bonding behavior in humans, and indicate that the well characterized influence of AVP on pair-bonding in voles may be of relevance also for humans.


Constance Holden, the reporter who wrote the Science blurb, done pissed me off seems to have made some interesting extrapolations from the research, given the abstract. I'd like to read the paper for myself and then possibly blog her ass back into the bronze age to compare my reading of the paper to hers.

--------------
Lou FCD is still in school, so we should only count him as a baby biologist. -carlsonjok -deprecated
I think I might love you. Don't tell Deadman -Wolfhound

Work-friendly photography
NSFW photography

   
afarensis



Posts: 1005
Joined: Dec. 2006

(Permalink) Posted: Sep. 03 2008,19:07   

This is interesting, and given the subject, relevant:

Random Amino Acid Mutations and Protein Misfolding Lead to Shannon Limit in Sequence-Structure Communication

Here is the abstract:

Quote
The transmission of genomic information from coding sequence to protein structure during protein synthesis is subject to stochastic errors. To analyze transmission limits in the presence of spurious errors, Shannon's noisy channel theorem is applied to a communication channel between amino acid sequences and their structures established from a large-scale statistical analysis of protein atomic coordinates. While Shannon's theorem confirms that in close to native conformations information is transmitted with limited error probability, additional random errors in sequence (amino acid substitutions) and in structure (structural defects) trigger a decrease in communication capacity toward a Shannon limit at 0.010 bits per amino acid symbol at which communication breaks down. In several controls, simulated error rates above a critical threshold and models of unfolded structures always produce capacities below this limiting value. Thus an essential biological system can be realistically modeled as a digital communication channel that is (a) sensitive to random errors and (b) restricted by a Shannon error limit. This forms a novel basis for predictions consistent with observed rates of defective ribosomal products during protein synthesis, and with the estimated excess of mutual information in protein contact potentials.


I haven't read it yet, but it is open access.

--------------
Church burning ebola boy

FTK: I Didn't answer your questions because it beats the hell out of me.

PaV: I suppose for me to be pried away from what I do to focus long and hard on that particular problem would take, quite honestly, hundreds of thousands of dollars to begin to pique my interest.

   
Henry J



Posts: 4046
Joined: Mar. 2005

(Permalink) Posted: Sep. 03 2008,22:49   

That leaves me wondering if one DNA three-pair code could be more reliable than another for the same amino acid?

Henry

  
afarensis



Posts: 1005
Joined: Dec. 2006

(Permalink) Posted: Sep. 04 2008,22:29   

Natural Selection on a Major Armor Gene in Threespine Stickleback

Here is the abstract:

Quote
Experimental estimates of the effects of selection on genes determining adaptive traits add to our understanding of the mechanisms of evolution. We measured selection on genotypes of the Ectodysplasin locus, which underlie differences in lateral plates in threespine stickleback fish. A derived allele (low) causing reduced plate number has been fixed repeatedly after marine stickleback colonized freshwater from the sea, where the ancestral allele (complete) predominates. We transplanted marine sticklebacks carrying both alleles to freshwater ponds and tracked genotype frequencies over a generation. The low allele increased in frequency once lateral plates developed, most likely via a growth advantage. Opposing selection at the larval stage and changing dominance for fitness throughout life suggest either that the gene affects additional traits undergoing selection or that linked loci also are affecting fitness.


I have a copy, email me at afarensis1@sbcglobal.net if you would like one.

--------------
Church burning ebola boy

FTK: I Didn't answer your questions because it beats the hell out of me.

PaV: I suppose for me to be pried away from what I do to focus long and hard on that particular problem would take, quite honestly, hundreds of thousands of dollars to begin to pique my interest.

   
Dr.GH



Posts: 1954
Joined: May 2002

(Permalink) Posted: Sep. 05 2008,10:32   

New study: Bad science writing gene found in people.

Edited by Dr.GH on Sep. 05 2008,08:32

--------------
"Science is the horse that pulls the cart of philosophy."

L. Susskind, 2004 "SMOLIN VS. SUSSKIND: THE ANTHROPIC PRINCIPLE"

   
stevestory



Posts: 8882
Joined: Oct. 2005

(Permalink) Posted: Sep. 07 2008,17:28   

http://opa.yale.edu/news/article.aspx?id=5980

Yale Researchers Find “Junk DNA” May Have Triggered Key Evolutionary Changes in Human Thumb and Foot

   
stevestory



Posts: 8882
Joined: Oct. 2005

(Permalink) Posted: Sep. 07 2008,17:30   

Quote (Dr.GH @ Sep. 05 2008,11:32)
New study: Bad science writing gene found in people.

Canadian Writer Found to Have Dozens of Extra Mutant Copies of Said Gene

   
dvunkannon



Posts: 1377
Joined: June 2008

(Permalink) Posted: Sep. 08 2008,10:21   

A consensus on the evolution of the genetic code from 2004. Nice job reminding everyone why Urey-Miller experiments are very relevant and useful

And the ID prediction is ...

--------------
I’m referring to evolution, not changes in allele frequencies. - Cornelius Hunter
I’m not an evolutionist, I’m a change in allele frequentist! - Nakashima

  
J-Dog



Posts: 4361
Joined: Dec. 2006

(Permalink) Posted: Sep. 10 2008,15:53   

Move over Flagellum - PacMan is here!



Linky - http://www.nature.com/news/2008/080116/full/news.2008.444.html

PSST! - Don't let Dembski or Behe see this - they'll probably get a couple more bad books out of it. "Gee - It Looks Designed".  "No Free PacMan", and then the endless bad commentary from O'Dreary, and of course, the McCain campaign claiming sexism, because it's not Ms. Packman.

--------------
Come on Tough Guy, do the little dance of ID impotence you do so well. - Louis to Joe G 2/10

Gullibility is not a virtue - Quidam on Dembski's belief in the Bible Code Faith Healers & ID 7/08

UD is an Unnatural Douchemagnet. - richardthughes 7/11

  
Wesley R. Elsberry



Posts: 4471
Joined: May 2002

(Permalink) Posted: Sep. 10 2008,16:19   

A Study on Whistles — And Only Whistles

A study claims dophins "decrease vocal output" in larger groups, but do their data support that?

--------------
"You can't teach an old dogma new tricks." - Dorothy Parker

    
stevestory



Posts: 8882
Joined: Oct. 2005

(Permalink) Posted: Sep. 10 2008,16:36   

Quote

Biologists on the Verge of Creating New Form of Life

A team of biologists and chemists is closing in on bringing non-living matter to life.

It's not as Frankensteinian as it sounds. Instead, a lab led by Jack Szostak, a molecular biologist at Harvard Medical School, is building simple cell models that can almost be called life.

Szostak's protocells are built from fatty molecules that can trap bits of nucleic acids that contain the source code for replication. Combined with a process that harnesses external energy from the sun or chemical reactions, they could form a self-replicating, evolving system that satisfies the conditions of life, but isn't anything like life on earth now, but might represent life as it began or could exist elsewhere in the universe.  


Linky

   
stevestory



Posts: 8882
Joined: Oct. 2005

(Permalink) Posted: Sep. 10 2008,17:24   

Friendly Invaders

A carl zimmer NYT article.

   
Wesley R. Elsberry



Posts: 4471
Joined: May 2002

(Permalink) Posted: Sep. 11 2008,06:49   

An enzymatic vestigial function discovered

Quote

"In creating these simulations of IMPDH, we observed something that hadn't been seen before," Yang said. "Previously, enzymes were believed to have a single 'pathway' through which they deliver catalytic agents to biological cells in order to bring about metabolic changes. But with IMPDH, we determined that there was a second pathway that also was used to cause these chemical transformations. The second pathway didn't operate as efficiently as the first one, but it was active nevertheless."


--------------
"You can't teach an old dogma new tricks." - Dorothy Parker

    
carlsonjok



Posts: 3324
Joined: May 2006

(Permalink) Posted: Sep. 11 2008,07:12   

Quote (Wesley R. Elsberry @ Sep. 11 2008,06:49)
An enzymatic vestigial function discovered

Quote

"In creating these simulations of IMPDH, we observed something that hadn't been seen before," Yang said. "Previously, enzymes were believed to have a single 'pathway' through which they deliver catalytic agents to biological cells in order to bring about metabolic changes. But with IMPDH, we determined that there was a second pathway that also was used to cause these chemical transformations. The second pathway didn't operate as efficiently as the first one, but it was active nevertheless."

[GilDodgen]

A backup system!  Any good programmer would have designed it this way!  ID predicted this!

It is only the blind materialist dogmatist Nazi Darwinist chance worshippers that refuse to acknowledge this compelling evidence for intelligent design.

[/GilDodgen]

--------------
It's natural to be curious about our world, but the scientific method is just one theory about how to best understand it.  We live in a democracy, which means we should treat every theory equally. - Steven Colbert, I Am America (and So Can You!)

  
  1591 replies since July 16 2008,08:10 < Next Oldest | Next Newest >  

Pages: (54) < 1 [2] 3 4 5 6 7 ... >   


Track this topic Email this topic Print this topic

[ Read the Board Rules ] | [Useful Links] | [Evolving Designs]